Physical Science

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Tempertaures in both Celsius and Fahrenheit scales can be negative. Why is a negative tempertaure impossible on the absolute scale?

  • Physical Science -

    Zero degrees on the absolute scale is defined as the temperature with minimum possible energy associated with motion of elementary particles (atoms and molecules). Such a temperature can never be negative.

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