Chemistry

posted by .

What happens to the mass of a beaker of water with a teaspoon of sugar in it measured on a balance pan compared to a teaspoon of sugar and a beaker of water separated on a balance pan? does the mass increase, decrease or stay the same? and why?

  • Chemistry -

    An example:
    1. beaker with mass 50.0 g + sugar with mass 10.0 grams + water with 25.0 = total 85.0 g

    2. beaker 50.0 g
    sugar 10.0 g
    water 25.0 g.
    Total = 85.0 grams.
    Since the sugar only dissolves (a physical change, not a chemical change) and there is no reaction, there is no loss or gain of mass so it matters little if the water and sugar are mixed.

Respond to this Question

First Name
School Subject
Your Answer

Similar Questions

  1. Chemistry

    Two beakers are placed in a sealed container surrounded with air. In one beaker is pure H2O (Beaker A) and the other beaker is a 10% Sugar solution (Beaker B). As the system approaches equilibrium what change occurs to the volume of …
  2. chemistry

    you have two beakers one filled to the 100 ml mark with sugar and the other filled to the 100 ml mark with water. you pour the sugar and all the water together in a bigger beaker and stir until all the sugar is compeletely dissovlved. …
  3. Chemistry

    You have two beakers, one filled to the 100-mL mark with sugar (the sugar has a mass of 180.0 g) and the other filled to the 100-mL mark with water (the water has a mass of 100.0 g). You pour all the sugar and all the water together …
  4. chemistry

    valerie placed 1.0g of salt into one beaker, 1.0g of soil into a second beaker, and 2.0g of sugar in a third beaker. She then added 200mL of water to each beaker and stirred the contents for 3 mintues. How many compounds and how many …
  5. chemistry

    Let's say for example I have 5g of copper in a beaker. Mass would be 5g + mass of beaker. If I add any given amount of water to the beaker containing the copper, that will change the mass of the beaker containing the copper. Am I correct …
  6. Math

    - 2 1/4 cups all purpose flour - 1 teaspoon of backing soda - 1 teaspoon of salt - 1 cup (2 sticks) of butter softened - 3/4 cups of sugar - 3/4 cup of packed brown sugar -1 teaspoon of vanilla extract -2 large eggs -2 cups of chocolate …
  7. math

    a chef is only making half of the frosting recipe 3 cups granulated sugar 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar 1 1/2 cups of water 1 cup powdered sugar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1/2 teaspoon almond
  8. Math

    A recipe calls for 2.3 cup of sugar for every 2 teaspoon of vanilla. How much sugar should be used for every 1 teaspoon of vanilla?
  9. Math

    A recipe calls for 2.3 cup of sugar for every 2 teaspoon of vanilla. How much sugar should be used for every 1 teaspoon of vanilla?
  10. Math

    A recipe calls for 3.2 cup of sugar for every 2 teaspoon of vanilla. How much sugar should be used for every 1 teaspoon of vanilla?

More Similar Questions