English

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Posted by rfvv on Thursday, December 9, 2010 at 11:58pm.


Posted by rfvv on Thursday, December 9, 2010 at 10:03pm.


1. We had to cook the turkey for six hours.

2. We had to cook the turkey in six hours.

3. We had to cook the turkey until six hours.

4. We had to cook the turkey from six hours.

5. We had to cook the turkey after six hours.

(#1 is right? What about the others? If we use other prepositions, can't we make correct sentences? Would you let me know what other prepositions we can use? Thank you.)



English - Ms. Sue, Thursday, December 9, 2010 at 10:11pm
Yes. # 1 is right. It took six hours of cooking for the turkey to be completely cooked.

The other sentences have different meanings -- but are not usually used.
======================================
(Thank you for your help. Would you like to check the following?)

1. We had to cook the turkey for six hours. (correct)

2. We had to cook the turkey in six hours. (What does this mean? Does 'in' mean 'within'? And then is this sentence correct?)

3. We had to cook the turkey until six hours. ( If we use 'until 7:00' p.m. instead of 'until six hours',then this sentence is right?)

4. We had to cook the turkey from six hours. (If we use 'from 7:00 a.m.' instead of 'from six hours', then is this sentence correct?)

5. We had to cook the turkey after six hours. (If we use 'after 7:00 a.m. instead of 'after six hours', then is this sentence correct?)








English - Writeacher, Friday, December 10, 2010 at 7:50am
2. We had to cook the turkey in six hours. (What does this mean? Does 'in' mean 'within'? And then is this sentence correct?) With "within" it's fine, yes.

3. We had to cook the turkey until six hours. ( If we use 'until 7:00' p.m. instead of 'until six hours',then this sentence is right?) yes

4. We had to cook the turkey from six hours. (If we use 'from 7:00 a.m.' instead of 'from six hours', then is this sentence correct?) Yes, but I'd say from 7:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m.

5. We had to cook the turkey after six hours. (If we use 'after 7:00 a.m. instead of 'after six hours', then is this sentence correct?) yes

============================
(Thank you for your help.
I'd like to ask something related to the previous question. I'd like to know the difference among the prepositions. Are they all grammatical? Are the following sentences the same in meaning?>)

1. We had to cook the turkey for six hours.

2. We had to cook the turkey in six hours.

3. We had to cook the turkey within six hours.

  • English -

    All are grammatically correct.

    1 - refers to how long the turkey must be cooked so it's done properly and no one will get sick from eating it!

    2 and 3 - seem to refer to when we needed to START cooking the turkey; either "within" and "in" could be used here.

  • English -

    cooking writing english

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