Statistics

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McMaster University researchers Margo Wilson and Martin Daly showed 209 male and female students pictures of attractive and not-so-attractive people of the opposite sex. Each was then offered a chance to win a prize. They could accept a check for between $15 and $35 tomorrow or one for $50 to $75 at some point in the future. The results for men: After a man views pictures of women who were of average attractiveness, they made a rational decision about accepting a larger prize amount some time in the future. But when they had just seen pictures of beautiful women, they discounted the future value of the reward in an irrational way and opted instead for the immediate and smaller cash outlay. In other words, after seeing a very attractive woman, the men were more likely to make dumb choices. the results for women: Viewing the photographs of men- whether they were average or above average attractiveness- had no effect on women's ability to make rational decisions.


What is the Explanatory variable(s)/Factor(s) Quantitative vs. Categorical?

What are the Treatment(s) or Factor Levels?

What are the response variable(s) Quantitative vs. Categorical?

Describe the experiment design.

Explain how experimental design principles apply in this study: Control, Randomization, Replication

Is Blocking used? If so describe the blocking and why it was used?

Is Blinding used? If so, describe the blinding in context.

What concerns do you have with this study?

What conclusions can be drawn?

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