physics

posted by Anonymous

If you tried to smuggle gold bricks by filling your backpack, whose dimensions are 66 cm 18 cm 15 cm, what would its mass be

  1. drwls

    Assume your backpack volume is 66*18*15 cm^3. Multiply that by the density (or specific gravity) of gold, which is 19.3 g/cm^3. The answer will be in grams. Convert that to kg or lb if you wish.

    http://www.reade.com/Particle_Briefings/spec_gra.html

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