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Question from the Classroom: 10
A student claims that the equation Ö(-x) = 3 has no solution, since the square root of a negative number does not exist. Why is this argument wrong?

  • math -

    Because you could write the answer in imaginary numbers. So technically it does exist. Not sure if that's the exact answer you're looking for, but....
    If you're thinking along the terms of a+bi
    then the square root of -3 would be
    1.73205...i
    the dots are just the extra numbers. I assume you'd round it. But keep the curved i at the end.

  • math -

    If you equation is
    √-x = 3 then

    x = -9 is a real number solution to the equation

  • math -

    isn't it an imaginary number

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