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English1A- Critical Thinking and Writing

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I put a post earlier last nite. Did everyone miss it? :(

  • English1A- Critical Thinking and Writing -

    http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1258249374
    the link is for those who missed it.

  • English1A- Critical Thinking and Writing -

    You wrote:

    Society affects how the children of today perceive gender roles. From a very early age, the basic rules of membership (membership in what? are taught as<~~delete "as" and insert "when" girls are typically given pretty dolls to play with while boys are given G.I. Joes. In addition to these toys, children watch a lot of television which includes a variety of cartoons including the popular films of Disney<~~insert comma such as Snow White, Cinderella, and Peter Pan. Because children experience a limited amount of entertainment outside the home, they are easily consumed by mass media such as viewing these popular Disney films as<~~choose a different word they are fun to watch and easily understood. Although Disney films continue<~~reconsider verb tense to be popular among children and families for many generations, these animated films tend to show gender stereo types<~~sp?? and present an idea that the roles of women and men are not what they appear to be in society today. In these beloved fairy tales, female characters are usually increasingly beautiful and helpless, dependent, just waiting for her ‘Prince”<~~use double quotation marks in both places to come and rescue her, while the ?? characters are typically aggressive, bold, brave, and heroic, fighting to save the day. What messages do these sorts of representations send to young children? What kinds of hopes and dreams have<~~subj-verb agreement problem society help<~~incorrect verb form programmed<~~incorrect verb form them to desire? What if Cinderella picked up her own shoe? Would it have mattered then if princesses took matters into their own hands? While some cartoons may have a positive effect on young children, others have a negative effect causing boys and girls to have false perceptions of the real world when it comes to gender roles despite how ‘magical’<~~delete quotation marks unless you're actually quoting someone -- and then cite the source the films appear to be.

    The last sentence is my thesis. I would like to<~~You would like to? or you will? talk about how Disney films portray female and male characters in their movies. Females are normally feminine, homemakers, beautiful, and males are normally masculine, heroes, out to save the world.

    Thesis statement is fine.

  • English1A- Critical Thinking and Writing -

    Yes, I will be discussing how Disney portray female and male characters in their movies.

    I will work on the revisions right now and get back to you. Thank you!

  • English1A- Critical Thinking and Writing -

    Gender Stereotypes

    Society affects how the children of today perceive gender roles. From a very early age, the basic rules of membership are taught when girls learn to do feminine, girly things, such as playing with pretty dolls, and boys learn to do macho, masculine things, such as playing with toy guns or G.I. Joes. In addition to these toys, children watch a lot of television which includes a variety of cartoons including the popular films of Disney, such as Snow White, Cinderella, and Peter Pan. Because children experience a limited amount of entertainment outside the home, they are easily consumed by mass media such as viewing these popular Disney films; they are fun to watch and easily understood. Although Disney films continues to be popular among children and families for many generations, these animated films tend to show gender stereotypes and present an idea that the roles of women and men are not what they appear to be in society today. In these beloved fairy tales, female characters are usually increasingly beautiful and helpless, dependent, just waiting for her “Prince” to come and rescue her, while the male characters are typically aggressive, bold, brave, and heroic, fighting to save the day. What messages do these sorts of representations send to young children? What kinds of hopes and dreams has society helped programmed them to desire? What if Cinderella picked up her own shoe? Would it have mattered then if princesses took matters into their own hands? While some cartoons may have a positive effect on young children, others have a negative effect causing boys and especially girls to have false perceptions of the real world when it comes to gender roles despite how magical the films appear to be.

    Many people are concerned with the portrayal of women and the questionable behavior in Disney animated films. Typical roles for females in these types of films include being princesses, queens, or homemakers, if not someone evil. A brief description of a typical Disney film includes a fairytale princess in pursuit of love and romance, willing to give up anything for her beloved prince charming to come and sweep her off her feet, followed by a “happily ever after” ending. In Henry A. Girous’s “Kinderculture” he states, “In both The Little Mermaid and The Lion King, female characters are constructed within narrowly defined gender roles. Most of these female characters in these films are ultimately subordinate to men and define their sense of power and desire almost exclusively in terms of dominant male narratives.” (Girous 57) For example, Ariel in the Little Mermaid sacrifices her voice and her family to gain a pair of legs so that she can pursue handsome Prince Eric in the human world. Women in these films are mostly illustrated as being dependent and subservient to the men. Although children might be delighted by Ariel’s teenage rebelliousness for wanting independence from her father to be with her prince, they are brainwashed to believe in the end that desire, choice, and empowerment are the keys to capturing and falling in love with handsome, desirable men, such as Prince Eric. In addition, a lot of times these male characters display forceful behavior to get what they want, whether it is a girl or a material object such as Gaston in Beauty and the Beast and Hercules. Unfortunately, these types of roles are typical, to varying degrees, in majority of Disney films. These characters are role models to the children that watch Disney movies and it is difficult to see how a film such as these, does more than reinforce negative stereotypes about women and girls.

    Is the princess stereotype harming little girls of today’s society? The Disney princesses created a fixed of femininity, one that young girls internalize and mimic. They embody grace, delicacy, poise, and naivety, compared to the animalistic portrayal of men. “Good girls” are never unattractive: those positions are reserved for the villainess female characters. Princesses depend on their prince to rescue and fight for them because they could never do it on their own. They are known to be emotional, easily upset, and frightened. The characters that play these types of roles have not changed quite a bit from back then either. They still have the same big breasts, tiny waist, fluttering eye lashes, and seductress, coy expressions. Princesses all have beautiful faces with perfect hair and make-up with large, innocent eyes. Children are being lead to believe that beauty is all you need even if you do not have anything else. In the Disney’s animated film the Little Mermaid, as Ariel gives up her voice: hence the ultimate sacrifice, Ariel says “…how can i…” and Ursula interrupts, “Well you have your looks, your pretty face, and don’t underestimate the importance of body language” as Ursula sways her ‘behind’ from one side to the other as if trying to get a man’s attention. Sexuality is greatly emphasized in many Disney films but too much can be seen as unhealthy for young children who idolizes these fairy tale princesses.

    Pocahontas is another example of a female character that is being sexualized in another Disney film that is targeted for young children. Although Pocahontas was a real woman, she was very different from the Disney image. She is a young Native American who possesses great beauty and grace. In the Disney film, she was created with a Barbie doll body – tall with long, muscular legs and arms, huge breasts, a tiny waist, and long neck. In Aidman’s article “Pocahontas: Problematizing the Pro-Social” she states, “Feminist arguments point out that holding up these unrealistic body images to young audiences is unhealthy. A girl’s self-esteem can be endangered when comparing their own bodies to Hollywood’s representation of the ultimate desirable woman.” Aspiring to unrealistic body shape and weight can lead to serious illness, not just physical, but psychological as well if children not only view these films for entertainment purposes, but also because they are inspired to be and look like a real princess one day. Moreover, reports indicated the character of Pocahontas was drawn from blended images of top fashion models, Iman and Kate Moss. Compared with other Disney heroines, such as Snow White, Cinderella, or Belle, she is as beautiful, but only sexier, more sensual, and exotic. However, not all girls resemble fashion models at all, nor do they even come close to looking like one.

    This is 3 pages, I need at least 3 more. Please let me know if my essay flows well and I'm on the right track? Thank You!

  • English1A- Critical Thinking and Writing -

    Again, I ask, "membership" in what?

    Why is "Prince" in quotation marks? Are you quoting someone? If so, cite your source. If not, remove the quotation marks. Same thing for "behind" in the 3rd paragraph.

    Be careful of too much generalizing. I have two granddaughters, ages 8 and 9: Both are finished with dolls of any kind, one loves all sports, including scuba diving and skiing, and the other would rather play Lego Star Wars on the Xbox with her brothers than anything else I'd consider girly!!

    Since you've already named Girous in the sentence, you don't need his name in the citation. Watch punctuation, too. It should be "... narratives" (57).

    So far, so good. Nice smooth writing overall.

    When you post again, be sure to post in a new message so your message doesn't get lost farther down the website.

  • English1A- Critical Thinking and Writing -

    Membership meaning belonging to society as far as gender goes. Girls doing girly things and boys doing male things. Children are taught from a young age to do these types of things and for instance if boys start wanting to wear nail polist or wear lipstick, society would not find this type of behavior acceptable.

    Sorry for the misunderstanding. We read a short essay in class called "Basic Rules of Membership" so I'm just including the idea in the story.

    I thought it was okay to include quotation marks to emphasize on a specific word, I didn't know it was not allowed. My professory grades my paper with very little writing on it so I never know what is okay and what is not.

    Thank you.

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