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How did the minority groups’ struggle for civil rights begin in the 1950s? Which event from this time do you think was most responsible for bringing public attention to the American Civil Rights Movement? Explain why you bringing public attention to the selected this event.

  • history -

    Thank you for using the Jiskha H omework Help Forum. Here are some sites on the American Civil Rights Movement:

    1. (Wikipedia): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African-American_Civil_Rights_Movement_(1955%E2%80%931968)

    2. http://essayinfo.com/sample/essay/306/

    3. http://school.familyeducation.com/civil-rights/african-american-history/47045.html

    4. (Photo Gallery): http://library.thinkquest.org/C004391F/

    5. (heroes): http://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmheroes1.html

    6. (Research Links): http://www.smccd.net/accounts/skylib/civrightslinks.html

    Sra

  • history -

    The historic "Brown vs. the Board of Education" Supreme Court school desegregation decision was made in 1954.

  • history -

    pooka

  • history -

    Civil Rights Movement is sometimes defined as a struggle against racial segregation that began in 1955 when Rosa Parks, the "seamstress with tired feet," refused to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Alabama. Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 Supreme Court case that attacked the notion of "separate but equal," has also been identified as the catalyst for this extraordinary period of organized boycotts, student protests, and mass marches.These legendary events, however, did not cause the modern Civil Rights Movement, but were instead important moments in a campaign of direct action that began two decades before the first sit-in demonstration.

  • history -

    Civil Rights Movement (1955-1968) refers to the reform movements in the United States aimed at abolishing racial discrimination of African Americans; this article covers the phase of the movement between 1954 and 1968, particularly in the South. By 1966, the emergence of the Black Power Movement, which lasted roughly from 1966 to 1975, enlarged and gradually eclipsed the aims of the Civil Rights Movement to include racial dignity, economic and political self-sufficiency, and freedom from White authority. Several scholars refer to the movement as the Second Reconstruction, a name that alludes to the Reconstruction after the Civil War.

    The Civil Rights Movement prior to 1955 confronted discrimination against African-Americans with a variety of strategies. These included litigation and lobbying efforts by traditional organizations such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The crowning achievement of these efforts was the legal victory in Brown v. Board of Education (1954), which overturned the "separate but equal" legal doctrine derived from Plessy and made segregation legally impermissible but provided few practical remedies.

    Private citizens, simultaneously invigorated by the victory of Brown but frustrated by its lack of immediate practical effect, increasingly rejected gradualist, legalistic approaches as the primary tool to bring about desegregation in the face of "massive resistance" by proponents of racial segregation and voter suppression. In defiance, they adopted a combined strategy of direct action with nonviolent resistance known as civil disobedience. Acts of civil disobedience produced crisis situations between practitioners and government authorities. The authorities of federal, state, and local governments often had to respond immediately to crisis situations, and the results were often in the practitioner's favor. Some of the forms of civil disobedience employed included boycotts, beginning with the successful Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955-1956) in Alabama; "sit-ins" such as the influential Greensboro sit-in (1960) in North Carolina; and marches, such as the Selma to Montgomery marches (1965) in Alabama.

    Noted legislative achievements during this phase of the Civil Rights Movement were passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1957 (minor in its effects, but the first anti-discriminatory federal legislation since Reconstruction), the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that banned discrimination in employment practices and public accommodations, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that restored voting rights, the Immigration and Nationality Services Act of 1965 that dramatically changed U.S. immigration policy, and the Civil Rights Act of 1968 that banned discrimination in the sale or rental of housing.

    he strategy of mass action within the court system shifted after Brown to "direct action"—primarily bus boycotts, sit-ins, freedom rides, and similar tactics that relied on mass mobilization, nonviolent resistance and civil disobedience—from 1955 to 1965. In part this was the unintend

  • history -

    LET ME TELL YOU HOW TO FIND THIS ONE

    JUST GO THE PUBLIC LIBRARY AND PICK UP THE BOOK FOR THIS TOPIC AND TYPE ALL THE MATERIALS
    STUDENTS DON'T USE INTERNET
    USE LIBRARY BOOK TOO MANY BOOKS THEY HAVE NO ONE READS THAT ...........

  • history -

    yourself!

  • history -

    fockers!!!!!!!!!!

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