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RepostedLiterature question

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I asked this question a couple of days ago, and wanted to post what my text states.Several agreed (B) was the best
answer to the question.

After sharing a book with a group of children, the teacher should always:

A. determine if discussion is necessary.

B. ask questions to assess listening
comprehension.

C. sit quietly to allow for thought.

D. read another book on a related topic.

My text states:

"You may want to ask a few open-ended
discussion questions at the end of the book. Some books end on such a satisfying or thoughtful note that discussion clearly is not appropriate.
Other times there may be a barrage of child comments and lively discussion.
Responding to literature involves the raising of questions. Discussion after a book reading, if the teacher deems it appropriate,can focus on student responses and questions. The teacher's
focus in asking questions in an after book discussion,is not to check children's knowledge,but rather to
learn from the child."

(I am confused with this question),
please give me some input and advice.
I surely would appreciate it.

Can you help me to understand why (A)
would not be a better answer?

  • RepostedLiterature question -

    Thanks again for telling us what your text says. Although many preschool teachers always encourage discussion after a book is read to the children, your text makes a good point that this is not a universal "rule." In light of your text information, A is clearly the best answer. :-)

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