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April 17, 2014

Search: torque

Number of results: 1,093

physics class-Help!!!
torque is radius X Force sin theta Torque 1 and 2 have angles of 90 degrees making it equal to 1. Torque 1:0.6 (radius of 1.2) X 6.0 N Torque 2:1.5 (radius of 3)X 5.2 N Torque 3:1.5 (radius of 3)X 5.2 N sine 30 degrees Torque 1 + Torque 2 + Torque 3 = Net Torque 3.6 + 7.8 + 3....
Wednesday, July 16, 2008 at 11:40pm by Steph

physics
Three forces are applied to a box wrench. find the total torque about the bolt in newton-meters caused by these forces. Is the torque a positive torque or a negative torque?
Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 6:04pm by Jen

physics
First compute the moment of inertia, I. It is something like I = M L^2/12, but don't trust me. Look it up. (a) Compute the angular acceleration rate (neglecting friction): alpha = (Torque)/I (radians/sec^2) Compute the time T required to rotate 500 radians: (Angle) = (1/2)* (...
Wednesday, April 28, 2010 at 11:08pm by drwls

Physics
No, that is not right. You can have a very high rotation rate with no force, or torque, at all. Angular momentum is conserved in the absence of torque. Rotational acceleration rate is proportional to torque, not force. You need to understand the difference between force and ...
Monday, January 31, 2011 at 9:45pm by drwls

torque
what happens to torque where force is applied? what happens to torque when force is moved from axis of rotation? what happens to torque when d changes? I will be happy to critique your thinking on this.
Tuesday, January 16, 2007 at 2:14am by Anonymous

physics class-Help!!!
No, it isn't, but thanks for showing your work. Actually there are only two torques applied. I don't see why you are applying a factor of 1/2 to each radius Torque 1 is +1.2 x 6.0 = +7.2 N-m Torque 2 is -3.0 x 5.2 sin 30 = -7.8 N-m The net torque is -0.6 N-m
Wednesday, July 16, 2008 at 11:40pm by drwls

physics
I got... Torque (by radiation) = F dot R = A*P dot R = A*P cos(theta) R P = 0.5 * (electric constant) * E^2 Torque (by gravity) = -mg sin(theta) Torque (by radiation) + Torque (by gravity) = 0 Then i solved for E. Which gives me a wrong answer. I don't know why.
Monday, May 14, 2012 at 2:24am by Jun

physics
Torque = (moment of inertia)*(angular deceleration rate) Solve for torque and relate that to the brake pads force. Torque = 2*(normal force)*0.85*R
Friday, October 28, 2011 at 12:12am by drwls

physics
torque= momentInertia*angacceleration 210*.330= moment Inertia*1.161 look up the momentu of inertia here:http://www.physics.uoguelph.ca/tutorials/torque/Q.torque.inertia.html and solve for mass
Wednesday, November 9, 2011 at 9:02pm by bobpursley

physics
I believe that I know this figure. If it is so, then... Let's examine the torques. The torque on A must equal the torque on B since the system is at rest. The torque on B can be found by summing the torques from mass x and mass y. Since mass z is on the axis of rotation (at B...
Tuesday, April 10, 2012 at 8:56pm by Elena

physics
torque=force*2.72 give torque about hinges. b. torque=force*2.72*sin11.5 c. zero.
Monday, March 4, 2013 at 8:26pm by bobpursley

Physics, check my answer pls
4. All of the following are true about torque except: A. its units are Newton-meters. B. it can only be produced by a force. C. torque is zero unless the force is pointed perpendicular to the moment arm. D. a force whose line of action passes through the axis of rotation ...
Thursday, December 6, 2012 at 2:58pm by Nev

Physics 121
The string attached to the ceiling supports the pulley and the block. The tension of this string is T = (1.8 + m) g, the torque of this force is Tr =(1.8 + m) gr. The torque created by the block is mgR . The condition for equilibrium: the net torque is zero. (1.8 + m) g...
Saturday, May 5, 2012 at 9:07pm by Elena

Physics
The torque applied by the rope must equal the torque applied by the weight. Compute it at the hinge, to make the problem simpler. The center of mass of the door, where the weight acts, is in the middle of the door. Torque = M*g*(width/2)*cos65 = 57.4 N-m
Sunday, March 25, 2012 at 11:20pm by drwls

physics
When we studied the concept of work, we learned that work = force x distance. Now we learn that torque = force x distance. What's different about these two definitions?A) For work, distance and force are in the same direction; for torque they are perpendicular to each other.B...
Thursday, March 1, 2012 at 12:23pm by jim

principles of physics
When we studied the concept of work, we learned that work = force x distance. Now we learn that torque = force x distance. What's different about these two definitions?A) For work, distance and force are in the same direction; for torque they are perpendicular to each other.B...
Friday, March 2, 2012 at 4:35am by CHRIS

physics
Are the two strings attached to the same point on the ceiling? If so, consider the net torque on either ball about the ceiling attach point. it must be zero. The gravity (weight) torque balances the Coulomb-force torque. M*g*Lsin22 = k q^2*Lcos22/(2Lsin22)^2 L can be solved ...
Friday, October 14, 2011 at 6:59am by drwls

statistics
An assembly process includes a torque wrench device that automatically tightens compressor housing bolts; the device has a known process standard deviation of = 3 lb-ft in the torque applied. A simple random sample of 35 nuts is selected, and the average torque to which they...
Friday, July 31, 2009 at 10:18pm by Bryant

physics
Your answer is incorrect because to failed to include the length of his arm when calculating the torque. Your answer has the dimension of force, not torque. The factor of 1/2 is correct for the torque due to the weight of his arm, IF the arm has uniform mass per unit length. ...
Sunday, October 12, 2008 at 11:22am by drwls

business statistics
An assembly process includes a torque wrench device that automatically tightens compressor housing bolts; the device has a known process standard deviation of = 3 lb-ft in the torque applied. A simple random sample of 35 nuts is selected, and the average torque to which they...
Thursday, July 30, 2009 at 3:19pm by Samantta

business statistics
An assembly process includes a torque wrench device that automatically tightens compressor housing bolts; the device has a known process standard deviation of = 3 lb-ft in the torque applied. A simple random sample of 35 nuts is selected, and the average torque to which they...
Saturday, August 1, 2009 at 12:01pm by Tonya

torque problem!
Torque? How do you think that? forceonspring=kx=m(a+g) x=1/k (m(acceleration +g) solve for x
Saturday, November 8, 2008 at 5:40pm by bobpursley

physics
(i) First compute the moment of inertia, I, with the formula for a disc or cyliner. The kinetic energy is (1/2)I w^2 and the angular momentum is I w. (ii) The electric power driving the motion is T*w, where T is the torque. Set that equal to the 50W electrical power input and ...
Friday, March 26, 2010 at 2:33pm by drwls

Physics
THe error is here: angaccelearation=torque*r/mr^2 that bold r should not be there. torque= I*angacceleration.
Wednesday, November 17, 2010 at 12:22pm by bobpursley

physics
(Average Torque) x (Angle in radians) = Work Torque = 0.1/(2*pi*0.53) = ___ J
Sunday, November 25, 2012 at 9:52pm by drwls

physics
for an object in equillibrium the net torque acting on it vanishes only if each torque is calculated about?
Friday, May 25, 2012 at 1:38am by owen

Electricity
A 3-phase 50Hz, 8 pole induction motor has an effective stator to rotor turns ratio of 4:2, rotor resistance 0.2ohms and rotor standstill reactance 0.3ohms. Calculate the starting torque and maximum torque. At full load the slip is 0.08. Calculate the torque, mechanical output...
Thursday, January 21, 2010 at 11:14am by Claire

statistics
Please only the formula and steps to do this problem. Thank you An assembly process includes a torque wrench device that automatically tightens compressor housing bolts; the device has a known process standard deviation of = 3 lb-ft in the torque applied. A simple random ...
Sunday, August 2, 2009 at 5:53pm by Lina

physics help!
The moment of inertia for the mass is I=mr^2 Now, torque to counter air friction.. airresiatance*r=torque
Thursday, March 25, 2010 at 10:39am by bobpursley

Physics
a. torque= LXforce, force is mg downward. torque= 1.84*.250*9.8*sin(180-37)
Wednesday, July 11, 2012 at 7:09pm by bobpursley

Physics
the dimensions of torque are the same as those of energy. Why it would nevertheless be inappropriate to measure torque in joules. Energy is force x distance, where distance is the distance in the direction of force. Torque is force x distance perpenduclar to force. Joules is a...
Monday, February 26, 2007 at 3:20am by Ishani

college
1. Consider the torque (moment) applied to the wheel, as measured about the point where the wheel touches the curb. To make the wheel rise above the curb, the torque due to the force must exceed the torque due to the weight, which equals m g sqrt(R^2-h^2) and is in the ...
Monday, May 18, 2009 at 11:26pm by drwls

physics
The satellite sweeps out equal areas in equal time (Kepler). As its distance from the sun gets smaller, its speed has to get bigger to sweep out the same area per hour. There is no torque on the thing. Torque is rate of change of angular momentum. No torque ---> constant ...
Saturday, January 19, 2008 at 10:23pm by Damon

physics
Assuming the hands are rodlike (which is not true), the torque exerted by a hand is half the length, times the mass, times g, times the sine of the angle that the hand makes with vertical. The direction of the torque must also be considered. It is positive (clockwise) from the...
Sunday, December 9, 2007 at 3:33pm by drwls

Physics
Because Torque is a cross product of radius vector(r) and Force vector(F). If r =Ax+By+Cz & F = ax+by+cz (where x,y and z are unit vectors in x,y and z directions) then x-component of torque Tx is : Tx = (Bc-Cb) = 3*0-3*4 = -12 Therefore x-comp. of the Torque is nagative (-12)
Monday, June 18, 2012 at 6:56pm by ajayb

Science
Writeacher, I urgently need you to check these sentences, though I believe they don't make sense. Although I'm not a mechanic, I don't think the use of scientific English is correct. 1) I would like to focus on a kind of technology which is used to increase the efficiency and ...
Thursday, June 14, 2012 at 6:05pm by John

Science
Writeacher, I urgently need you to check these sentences, though I believe they don't make sense. Although I'm not a mechanic, I don't think the use of scientific English is correct. 1) I would like to focus on a kind of technology which is used to increase the efficiency and ...
Friday, June 15, 2012 at 4:15pm by John

Physics
The torque calculation is impossible. Good luck on the take home test though! Never thought of posting the questions online...
Saturday, June 26, 2010 at 5:19pm by Torque

Foreign languages
Writeacher, I urgently need you to check these sentences, though I believe they don't make sense. Although I'm not a mechanic, I don't think the use of scientific English is correct. 1) I would like to focus on a kind of technology which is used to increase the efficiency and ...
Tuesday, June 12, 2012 at 4:10pm by John

physics
The applied torque minus the frictional torque is (23.1)(0.170)-3.63 = 0.28 N-m Torque divided by moment of inertia is the angular acceleration, alpha. Its units are radians/s^2. Calculate it To unreel all of the hose, you need to turn the reel through 15.5/0.17 = 91.1 radians...
Thursday, April 7, 2011 at 8:11pm by drwls

Physics
A lever is 5m long. The distance from fulcrum to the weight to be lifted is 1m. If the worker pushes on the opposite end with 400N, what is the max weight that can be lifted? l=5m h=1m F=400N F_g=? torque=F_g*l I first must find torque so that I can plug it into the above ...
Wednesday, November 7, 2007 at 5:06pm by Andrea

Physics
Torque is F x R, where x denotes a cross product vector. Depending upon the angle between the vectors, the maximum torque is F*R and the minimum toque is zero.
Saturday, October 8, 2011 at 6:48pm by drwls

Physics
force on each = Q E = 5 *10^-6 * 5 * 10^3 = 25 * 10^-3 N torque resulting from each = F D = 25 * 10^-3 * 2 = 50 * 10^-3 Nm both give same sign torque so total torque = 100 *10^-3 Nm = 0.1 Nm
Saturday, January 26, 2013 at 3:03am by Damon

Physics
A heavy concrete panel is being lifted into position in a building by means of a crane (see figure below). The tension of 2.52 104 N in the supporting cable produces a torque with respect to point O. (Let L = 41.0 m.) (a) Does this torque tend to rotate the panel clockwise or ...
Wednesday, July 25, 2012 at 12:25pm by Velma

Physics
The rotational KE is always (1/2) I w^2 The angular acceleration when torque is applied is alpha = (torque)/I I am sure you can take it from there. Show your work if further assistance is needed.
Thursday, March 4, 2010 at 8:58pm by drwls

physics
What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight, but 43.8 below horizontal? I tried multiplying the torque force by sin43.8 but it was wrong :(
Monday, November 15, 2010 at 3:25pm by pete

Physics
Angular acceleration = (Torque)/I They have given you the formula for I: M L^2/12 I would need to see the figure to tell you what the torque about the spin axis is.
Tuesday, December 6, 2011 at 7:33pm by drwls

physics
A person holds a ladder horizontally at its center. Treating the ladder as a uniform rod of length 3.55 m and mass 10.31 Kg, find the torque the person must exert on the ladder to give it an angular acceleration of 0.406 rad/s2. Should I set the given angular acceleration ...
Monday, June 4, 2007 at 4:27pm by anne

Physics
Torque is force multiplied by the "lever arm" distance of the point of application from an axis of rotation. Torque is not 'movement', as you have written. Perhaps you meant 'moment'.
Friday, September 3, 2010 at 8:45am by drwls

MIT2.01x
We will use moment equilibrium around the x axis to calculate the x-component of the reaction torque at and the axial torque resultant at section , for these two shafts in torsion.
Friday, May 31, 2013 at 10:42pm by Anonymous

Physics
I can understand how torque can have units of Newton-meters (Nm) but not Newton-meter-radians or Newton-milliradians. What does Nmrad mean? Use the two rpms and the 10 second interval to get the angular acceleration in rad/s^2. Call it alpha Once you know the torque T, use T...
Wednesday, April 28, 2010 at 1:22am by drwls

physics- torque
1. Find the magnitude of the torque produced by a 3.0 N force applied to a door at a perpendicular distance of 0.25 m from the hinge. 2. A simple pendulum consists of a 3.0 kg point mass hanging at the end of a 2.0 m long light string that is connected to a pivot point. a. ...
Saturday, January 13, 2007 at 8:19pm by Anonymous

physics
yes on the first. On the second, the torque needed is the same, however, it will need a larger force to make that same torque.
Monday, June 15, 2009 at 1:30pm by bobpursley

physics
Moment of force? What is that? Torque? Torque= momentofInertia*angular acceleration angular acceleation is not specified.
Monday, November 15, 2010 at 5:04am by bobpursley

physics
A 51.4 N force is applied to the outer edge of a door of width d = 2.72 m a) Find the torque when the force acts perpendicular to the door. N m (b) Find the torque when the force acts at an angle of = 11.5 with respect to the door surface. N m (c) Find the torque when ...
Monday, March 4, 2013 at 8:26pm by cobra

Physics
Compute the torque about the origin of the gravitational force F = −mg acting on a particle of mass m located at r = x + y. (Use the following as necessary: m, g, x, and y). Torque = F (cross) r Please help
Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 3:16pm by Tried, but to no avail

Physics
Consider the torque about the support that is 1.1 m from the end. If the plank is just starting to tip, there is no force at the other support, and the net torque is zero. Let X be the distance from the right support where the person is standing. The plank weight acts through ...
Monday, October 8, 2007 at 7:28pm by drwls

Physics
So, basically i wrote down the torque equilibrium equation where torque equals 0 and the point of reference being the one shown in the diagram. The distance from the point of reference to where Fg is applied is a PLUS b since a is just the distance from the point where F is ...
Tuesday, November 10, 2009 at 9:00pm by Anna

physics
A spinning flywheel has rotational inertia I = 402.9 kgm2. Its angular velocity decreases from 20.3 rad/s to zero in 266.6 s due to friction. What is the frictional torque acting? Torque= MomentofInertia*angularacceleration. You are given the moment of inertia (you named it ...
Monday, October 23, 2006 at 7:06pm by Anonymous

physics
(i) 20N * 0.2 m * (angle in radians). I cannot interpret your angle symbol, which shows up here as ,,a. (ii) Angular acceleration rate = (Torque)/(Moment of inertia) = (Torque)/[(Mass)*Rg^2] The torque is 4 N*m Angular acceleration = 4 N*m/(8*.15^2 kg m^2) = 22.2 rad/s^2 Time ...
Tuesday, July 20, 2010 at 8:53am by drwls

physics
The drawing is needed to show where and in what directions the forces are applied to the disk. Compute net torque. angular acceleration = (Net Torque)/(Moment of inertia)
Wednesday, November 2, 2011 at 12:16am by drwls

physics
Torque=momentinertia*anglular acceleration Torque= I * angacc but wf^2=wi^2+2*angacc*displacement wf^2=wi^2+2*angacc*revolutions*2PI where w is in rad/sec, angacc in rad/sec^2 solve for angacc, then torque
Saturday, December 11, 2010 at 8:01pm by bobpursley

Physics
The equation for the torque is the same as for the pulley. E.g., the puylling force of the quadriceps muscle acts as a pulley around the rotula, so can I calculate as a torque movement, knowing that the T = Nm (f x r). Thank you
Friday, September 3, 2010 at 8:45am by Emeric

Physics
.7=Torque*200/240*600 torque out=.7*3*240
Sunday, April 3, 2011 at 8:35pm by bobpursley

physics, torque
A crane shown in the drawing is lifting a 170-kg crate upward with an acceleration of 1.8 m/s2. The cable from the crate passes over a solid cylindrical pulley at the top of the boom. The pulley has a mass of 130 kg. The cable is then wound onto a hollow cylindrical drum that ...
Monday, June 4, 2007 at 12:35pm by Marigold

Physics
Well, they tell you what the period is 45.8/20 = 2.29 seconds However that is not the point d = pivot to center (CG) (I think it is 30 cm to the center of the meter stick but they do not say that) force down at CG = weight = Mg torque about pivot = Mg d sin theta for small ...
Sunday, December 14, 2008 at 3:50pm by Damon

physics class-Help!!!
A 3.0 m rod is pivoted about its left end.A force of 6.0 N is applied perpendicular to the rod at a distance of 1.2 m from the pivot causing a ccw torque, and a force of 5.2 is applied at the end of the rod 3.0 m from the pivot. The 5.2 N is at an angle of 30 degrees to the ...
Wednesday, July 16, 2008 at 11:40pm by Steph

physics
torque= I*angular acceleration solve for torque. Now sign. It is very arbritrary, but most write clockwise as positive, counterclockwise as negative, for torques, and rotation. Follow what your teacher gives as law on this convention of signs.
Wednesday, November 2, 2011 at 10:40am by bobpursley

Physics
A force is applied to a door at an angle of 56.8 and 0.34 m from the hinge. a) What force produces a torque with a magnitude of 2.18 Nm? b) How large is the maximum torque this force can exert?
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 at 8:34pm by Mike

physics
This site explains both pretty well, I think. (Broken Link Removed) The words "torque" and "moment" can be used interchangeably. The other meaning of moment (a brief interval of time) is not the same as torque.
Saturday, September 13, 2008 at 11:24pm by drwls

Physics
A 3.0-m rod is pivoted about its left end. A force of 6.0 N is applied perpendicular to the rod at a distance of 1.2m from the pivot causing a CCW torque, and a force of 5.2N is applied at the end of the rod 3.0m from the pivot. the 5.2N is at an angle of 30 degrees to the rod...
Tuesday, June 8, 2010 at 4:41pm by Katie

physics
Susie's torque or "moment" about the fulcrum is 450*2.5 = 1125 N*m Sally's torque is 500*2 = 1000 N*m Susie will lift Sally
Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at 9:14am by drwls

physics
to keep from nosing up, the torque about the rear axle from the front wheels has to be greater than the torque the rear wheels exert on the ground.
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at 6:55am by bobpursley

PHYSICS
A heavy concrete panel is being lifted into position in a building by means of a crane (see figure below). The tension of 1.89 104 N in the supporting cable produces a torque with respect to point O. (Let L = 39.3 m.) (b) Find the torque.
Wednesday, March 14, 2012 at 1:56pm by cindy

Physics please check
A uniform solid disk with a mass of 32.3 kg and a radius of 0.414 m is free to rotate about a frictionless axle. Forces of 90.0 N and 125 N are applied to the disk. (a) What is the net torque produced by the two forces? (Assume counterclockwise is the positive direction.) (b) ...
Tuesday, April 24, 2007 at 8:24pm by Mary

Physics
A beam which is fixed to a wall by bolting or which is extended from inside the building, the free other end of which is freely hanging in the air is called a cantilever. This may make for easier search if you intend to do so. The torque caused by weights on the beam is called...
Saturday, December 4, 2010 at 11:37pm by MathMate

Physics
Ignore the moment of inertia of the wheel. F=ma solve for F Now that F must come from the wheel-ground connection, and Torque/radius=forceatground Torque=ma/r
Tuesday, January 8, 2008 at 9:11pm by bobpursley

Physics
torque= force*radius torque*radius= mass*radius^2 * angular acceleration linear acceleraltion=angularacceleration*radius
Wednesday, November 17, 2010 at 11:06am by bobpursley

U. Phys
What is the angular momentum of a 3.7kg uniform cylindrical grinding wheel of radius 25cm when rotating at 1500rpm? How much torque(in magnitude) is required to stop it in 5.0s? Could you explain this in detail, I don't really understand torque and momentum well.
Monday, November 2, 2009 at 10:43am by Taylor

physics
In the figure, forces A, B, C and D each have magnitude 50.0 N and act at the same point on the object. What torque (magnitude and direction) does A force exert on the object about point P? What torque (magnitude and direction) B does force exert on the object about point P? ...
Saturday, April 12, 2008 at 3:02pm by Erin

Foreign languages
This is the second part of the paragraph. Though I don't think it makes sense at all, I would like you to have a look at it. I added a sentence on nanotechnology I'd like you to check, Writeacher. 1) So this element of the composite torque is not under direct control of the ...
Tuesday, June 12, 2012 at 5:55pm by John

physics
I dont understand the force placement. Use Torque=(momentinertia)angacc to get the moment of inertia, use the Parallel axis law. To get torque, force*distance*sinAngle
Sunday, February 12, 2012 at 5:48pm by bobpursley

Physics
A and B are really asking the same question, and the results are the same, since 1 N = 1 kg m/s^2. Assume that the water enters and leaves the waterwheel tangent to the wheel. The loss of angular momentum of the water, measured about the axis of the wheel, equals the TORQUE ...
Sunday, April 13, 2008 at 12:35am by drwls

Physics
The spinning wheel has angular momentum, lined up with its axis of spin. If you try to turn that axis, that requires torque, because you are changing the angular momentum vector. (the direction, not the magnitude). However the frame (gimbals) allow the vehicle to rotate around...
Friday, January 27, 2012 at 6:46pm by Damon

physics
The torque produced by the 10 N force is τ = 10 0.23 = 2.3 (Nm), The torque produced by the 9 N force is τ = 9 0.23 = 2.07 (Nm), The torque produced by the 12 N force is τ = 12 0.11 = - 1.32 (Nm) The total torque is τ =2.3 + 2.07 -1.32 = 3.5 (Nm).
Monday, April 30, 2012 at 12:10am by Elena

physics
torque=moment*accelerationangular torque=force*distance. now, the distance of the arm on the second door is 1/2, and the moment is 1/4 (look that up). so acceleration must be 2/(1/4)=8 x or the time is 1/8. check my thinking.
Tuesday, July 16, 2013 at 3:34pm by bobpursley

Physic Angular momentum and torque
What is the angular momentum of a 1.0kg uniform cylindrical grinding wheel of radius 19cm when rotating at 1700rpm ?How much torque is required to stop it in 4.6s ?
Saturday, March 29, 2014 at 11:19am by David

physics- torque
If the torque required to loosen a nut on the wheel of a car has a magnitude of a 40.0 N*m, what minimum force must be exerted by a mechanic at the end of a 30.0 cm wrench to loosen the nut?
Saturday, January 13, 2007 at 8:19pm by nicole

Physics
A uniform plank of length 5.1 m and weight 235 N rests horizontally on two supports, with 1.1 m of the plank hanging over the right support (see the drawing). To what distance x can a person who weighs 458 N walk on the overhanging part of the plank before it just begins to ...
Monday, October 8, 2007 at 7:28pm by Student

Torque
Not sure how to draw the diagram to this, or quite how to solve b and c: Several math students are taking a break from their studies by visiting a playground. One student pushes the others on a merry-go-round. The diameter of the merry-go-round is 3.0 m, and the student pushes...
Tuesday, July 1, 2008 at 9:55pm by Sick Sick

physics
If you push the outer edge of a 1.05-m-wide door with a 23.0-N tangential force, what torque results? What is the torque if you apply the same magnitude of force, in the same place, but at a 45 degree angle?
Friday, November 11, 2011 at 5:50pm by Jared

Physics
If you push the outer edge of a 1.05-m-wide door with a 23.0-N tangential force, what torque results? What is the torque if you apply the same magnitude of force, in the same place, but at a 45 degree angle?
Monday, November 14, 2011 at 12:31am by Jordyn

physics
A rod is nailed (flexibly) to a wall at one end. The other end is held up from letting the rod swing by a thread connected to the ceiling. The rod has mass M and length l. The moment of inertia is (Ml^2)/3. Determine the magnitude and direction of the force exerted on the rod ...
Monday, January 21, 2008 at 2:17pm by Hannah

physics
The torque on each is massdensity*h*gh/2 or T=massdensity*g*h^2/2 of course, h is different. angular acceleration is Torque/momentinertial where momentinertia=massdensity*h*h^3/3 angular acceleartion= k/h^2 so, the longer the heigth, the slower the falling. check my thinking.
Sunday, November 1, 2009 at 11:46am by bobpursley

Physics
Torque produces accelerations, I see no acceleration in the description. No torque. There is a force toward the center (centripetal force). I dont know which way the ball is rotating,(clockwise, or counter clockwise), so direction of angular mometnum is unknown
Saturday, November 13, 2010 at 4:55pm by bobpursley

Classical Mechanics Physics - Urgent help please
hey Mum, i did as u said but i got only the angular velocity,others are wrong. this is how i got my alpha: Torque=m*g*(l/2)=I_CM*alpha. ie taking torque from origin. am i correct? if yes then what might be the problem.
Saturday, December 7, 2013 at 5:46pm by vivipop

Physics
As a swimmer pulls his arm through the water, various muscles exert forces on the upper arm. The figure below shows a force F exerted on the humerus (upper arm bone) by the pectoral muscle. The muscle is connected to the bone d = 7.00 cm from the center point O of the shoulder...
Thursday, November 8, 2012 at 4:19pm by Pat

PHYSICS
A 3.0m rod is pivoted about its left end. A force of 6.0N is applied perpendicularto the rod at a distance of 1.2m from the pivot causing a ccw torque, and a force of 5.2N is applied at the end of the rod 3.0m fromt eh pivot. The 5.2N is at an angle if 30 degrees to the rod ...
Saturday, November 10, 2007 at 8:22pm by magic 8 ball

Physics
First get the angular deceleration rate, alpha, using alpha * 4.75 s = 1.65 rad/s alpha = 0.347 rad/s^2 Then use Torque = I * alpha Solve for I. You know the torque T already
Monday, March 8, 2010 at 8:09pm by drwls

Thermo engineering
torque= force*radius power= torque*angular speed where angular speed= 300*2PI/60 rad/sec this will give you power in watts.
Tuesday, May 10, 2011 at 3:18pm by bobpursley

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