Friday
April 18, 2014

Search: suppose that f is a differentiable function of x and y and g(r,s)=f(2r-s, s^2-4r). use the table of funstions to calculate gr(1,2) and gs(1,2)

Number of results: 23,145

Calculus (Continuity and Differentiability)
Alright, I think I'm getting it more now. So, the function is in fact continuous at all points? But is it also differentiable at x = 2? Since I am given the graph of the derivative and x = 2 does produce a value, would it be considered differentiable? I also know that if I can...
Saturday, November 12, 2011 at 3:43pm by Mishaka

Calculus
Suppose f(x) is a differentiable function with f(-1)=2 and f(2)=-1. The differentiable function g(x) is defined by the formula g(x)=f(f(x))' A. Compute g(-1) and g(2). Explain why g(x)=0 must have at least one solution A between -1 and 2. B. Compute g'(-1) and g'(2) in terms ...
Sunday, April 1, 2012 at 12:10pm by Lin

math
It's differentiable for every point besides at it's 2 vertexes or where the function equals 0. In this case, it's not differentiable at x = -1 and x = 1.
Thursday, September 29, 2011 at 4:22pm by Sarah

math
pretty broad question. Some examples: All polynomials are differentiable. Rational functions are differentiable except where their denominator is zero All exponental functions are differentiable, as long as their epxonents are. Same for logs, where domain > 0 Things with ...
Tuesday, December 13, 2011 at 8:58am by Steve

Math--Calculus
I'm having a tough time figuring out this problem... S(x) = bracket (piecewise function) a + b arcsin*(tan x/tan 66) for 0 ≤ x < 66 24 for 66 ≤ x ≤ 90. Is the function differentiable? Why or why not? Could someone please help me? My teacher told me the ...
Saturday, November 13, 2010 at 5:16pm by Jill

calculus
In the following problem, suppose f(x) is continuous (and differentiable) function on the interval (0,1). Suppose also that for 0 < x<(1/4) f(x) is negative, for (1/4) <x<1 f(x) is positive, f(1/4)=0, f (2/3)=1, f ' (1/3)= 1, f ' (2/3) =3. a. If the function G(x) ...
Friday, July 3, 2009 at 11:11pm by james

CalculusAB
determine if differentiable everywhere:` "everywhere" means the ℝ domain, or [-∞,∞]. If you can find a point where the function is not differentiable, then the function is not differentiable everywhere. For a function to be "differentiable" in an interval, it...
Sunday, October 4, 2009 at 11:46pm by MathMate

Calculus
Decide if the following function f(x) is differentiable at x=0. Try zooming in on a graphing calculator, or calculating the derivative f'(0) from the definition. f(x) = x^4sin(2/x), if x is not equal to 0, and f(x) = 0 if x = 0. If it is differentiable, what is the derivative...
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 at 7:29pm by Abigail

math
Critical points are points in the given interval (0,2π) at which the derivative is zero, or the function is not differentiable. The function f(x)=sin(x)cos(x) is differentiable from (-∞,∞), so you only have to look at the points at which the derivative is zero.
Monday, November 22, 2010 at 11:08am by MathMate

mean value theorem
Show that the function f(x)=1-|x|, [-1,1] does not satisfy the hypotheses of the mean value theorem on the given interval. Also how do I graph the function together with the line through the points A(a,f(a)) and B(b,f(b)). Also how do I find values of c in (a,b) that satisfy f...
Sunday, October 29, 2006 at 12:09pm by Jen

math
Suppose p(x) is a twice-differentiable function such that p(1) = 3, p'(1) = 0, and p(1) = -2. Which of the following is true? there is a relative maximum at p(1) = 3 there is a relative minimum at p(1) = 3 there is a point of inflection at p(1) = 3 none of these are true
Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 12:17am by lilly

calc again!
i got answers for this one, but i feel like i did something wrong. f(x)= 2x+1 when x is less than or equal to 2 (1/2)x^2 + k when x is greater than 2 1) what value of k will make f continuous at x = 2? my answer: i got k = 3 because it would make the two parts of the function ...
Friday, February 20, 2009 at 12:04am by jane

calculus
Let f be the function defined by f(x)= sqrt(x), 0 <or= x <or= 4. and f(x)= 6-x, 4 < x <or= 6 a. Is f continuous at x=4? justify. b. Find the average rate of change of f(x) on the closed interval [0,6]. c. suppose the function g(x)= k sqrt(x), 0 <or= x <or= 4...
Monday, October 8, 2012 at 7:06pm by lisa

calc
Which of the following statements would always be true? I. If f is differentiable at x = c, then f is continuous at x = c. II. If f is continuous at x = c, then f is differentiable at x = c. III. If f is not continuous at x = c, then f is not differentiable at x = c.
Sunday, December 9, 2012 at 8:59pm by Meera

Calculus
Show that the function f(x)= x^(3) +3/(x^2) +2 has exactly one zero on the interval (-infinity, 0). So far this is what I have: 0=x^3 + 3/(x^2) +2 -2= (1/x^2)(x^5 + 3) -2x^2= x^5 +3 But now I'm stuck. I also am not sure if this is how I'm supposed to be solving the problem. We...
Sunday, April 12, 2009 at 4:16pm by Lauren

Math--Calculus
"S(x) = bracket (piecewise function) a + b arcsin*(tan x/tan 66) for 0 ≤ x < 66 24 for 66 ≤ x ≤ 90. Given a=12, b=2/15. Is the function differentiable? Why or why not?" I suppose this is the number of hours of sunshine where x is the latitude in degrees ...
Saturday, November 13, 2010 at 5:16pm by MathMate

Calculus
Suppose f and g are functions that are differentiable at x=1 and that f(1)= 2, f'(1)= -1, g(1)= -2, and g'(1)= 3. Find the value of h'(1). h(x)= [x f(x)] / [ x + g(x) ]
Saturday, September 26, 2009 at 11:58am by Dee

calculus
suppose that f(x) = x^3 x<=1 ax+b x>1 is differentiable at x=1 then a=?, b=?
Saturday, October 20, 2012 at 8:44am by jul

Calculus
Assuming that f and g are functions differentiable at a (though we do not know their formulas). Prove that f +g is differentiable at a using the definition of the derivative.
Monday, October 15, 2012 at 11:37pm by Marissa

calc
x^2 + √(x+y) + y^2 = 0; y is a differentiable function of x
Wednesday, May 8, 2013 at 11:58pm by Sunny

AP Calculus
Rolle's theorem states that: "Suppose that y=f(x) is continuous at every point of the closed interval [a,b] and differentiable at every point of its interior (a,b). If f(a)=f(b), then there is at least one number c in (a,b) at which f'(c)=0. Here all conditions are satisfied ...
Monday, February 7, 2011 at 1:59pm by MathMate

Calculus
Suppose f and g are functions that are differentiable at x = 1 and that f(1) = 2, f '(1) = -1, g(1) = -2, and g '(1) = 3. Find the value of h '(1). h(x) = (x2 + 11) g(x) h '(1) =
Thursday, June 13, 2013 at 8:16pm by Mike

Calculus
Sketch the graph of a function that is continuous at x=5 but not differentiable at x=5.
Tuesday, November 10, 2009 at 7:27pm by Matt

Algebra
f(x) is a function differentiable at x=1 and f(1)=1/8. What is the value of f(x)-f(1) f'(x) denotes the derivative of f(x)
Tuesday, May 21, 2013 at 10:50am by Andy

Maths
f(x)is a function differentiable at x=1 and f'(1)=1/8. what is the value of f(x)-f(1) f'(x) denotes the derivative of f(x)
Friday, May 24, 2013 at 4:18pm by Andy

math
find the numerical deriviative of the given function at the indicated point. use h=0.001. is the function differentiable at the indicated point? 4x- x^2, x=0
Saturday, October 3, 2009 at 8:10pm by joclyn

math
The mean value theorem requires that the function be continuous and differentiable in the open interval (a,b). Hint: check if the function is continuous throughout the interval [-1,5].
Friday, June 17, 2011 at 4:18pm by MathMate

Calculus
Suppose you have a rational function that its denominator is (X-c) and numerator can be any function. Suppose you need to find the limit of this rational function given as x goes to value c. Can you always say that for this problem the limit does not exist?
Sunday, January 22, 2012 at 3:45am by Cody

math
Suppose you have a rational function that its denominator is (X-c) and numerator can be any function. Suppose you need to find the limit of this rational function given as x goes to value c. Can you always say that for this problem the limit does not exist?
Sunday, January 22, 2012 at 7:10pm by Codster

Math
Hey I have a question, what does is mean when a function is/not differentiable? thank you.
Monday, February 1, 2010 at 12:02am by Anonymous

calculus
sketch graph of a function f that is differentiable and that satisfies the following
Thursday, March 24, 2011 at 1:42pm by Anonymous

calculus
sketch graph of a function f that is differentiable and that satisfies the following
Thursday, March 24, 2011 at 1:42pm by Anonymous

need help i don't understand
"If y is a differentialble function of u, u is a diffferentiable function of v, and v is a differentiable function of x, then dy/dx=dy/du *du/dv *dy/dx
Saturday, October 5, 2013 at 12:30pm by loli

Calculus
Determine whether Rolle's Theorem can be applied to f on the closed interval [a,b]. If Rolle's Theorem can be applied, find all values of c in the open interval (a,b) such that f'(x)=0. f(x) = x^(2/3) - 1 [-8,8] I plugged in both values and found out that they both equal 4 so ...
Thursday, September 26, 2013 at 9:01pm by Maddie

math
Suppose that a<b are extended real numbers and that f is differentiable on (a,b). If f' is bound on (a,b) prove f is uniformly continuous.
Thursday, March 8, 2012 at 10:19pm by sarah

calculus
Describe all of the different ways a function may not be differentiable at the point P (a,f(a)).
Wednesday, March 3, 2010 at 9:34pm by Anonymous

Calculus (Limits)
f(x) is a function differentiable at x=1 and f′(1)=1/13. What is the limit of (x^3 - 1)/f(x) - f(1) as x approaches 1?
Sunday, July 21, 2013 at 3:17am by Drake

calculus (hint?)
f(x) is a twice differentiable function such that f(2x)=f(x+5)+(x−5)^2 What is f''(x)?
Sunday, July 21, 2013 at 6:01pm by andy

Calculus Help Please!!!
Yes, f is continuous on [0, 2] and differentiable on (0, 2) since polynomials are continuous and differentiable on R. I need the answer for second part. Thanks!!!
Friday, April 4, 2014 at 11:12pm by Uygur

CACULUS
If the function f(x) is differentiable and f(x)= {ax^3 + 6x, if x≤1 {bx^2 + 4, if x>1 then a = What do I do?? No idea what's going on..
Sunday, January 4, 2009 at 1:11pm by BOB

Calculus
The function is continuous everywhere but not differentiable at x = -7. Plot it and you will see why. The slope abruptly changes at x = -7
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 at 7:41pm by drwls

Calculus (Continuity and Differentiability)
Your function has two different derivatives at x = 2. I would not call it differentiable there.
Saturday, November 12, 2011 at 3:43pm by Damon

math
The function does not satisfy the conditions of the theorem. It is not differentiable at x=0. Hence, nor is it on any interval including x=0.
Saturday, December 10, 2011 at 6:10am by Steve

calculus
A critical point of a function within its domain is any point which is not differentiable or when its derivative is zero. Since f(x)=(x+2)^5 * (x-3)^4 is a polynomial, its domain is (-∞,∞) and differentiable throughout. The only critical points are when the ...
Friday, April 22, 2011 at 11:03pm by MathMate

calc
If the function is twice differentiable within its domain, inflection points occur at values of c where f"(c)=0. Note that not all points where f"(c)=0 are inflection points. You need to check the concavity between points where f"(x)=0. It is concave up if f"(x)>0 and ...
Tuesday, December 1, 2009 at 4:47pm by MathMate

math
If g is a differentiable function such that g(x) < 0 for all real numbers x and if f'(x)=(x2-4)g(x), which of the following is true?
Monday, January 3, 2011 at 3:55pm by nicko

Real Analysis
a) Give an example of a function, whose limit exists as x approaches 2, but it is not continuous at x=2 b)Give an example of a function that is not differentiable at x=2, but it is continuous at x=2
Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 11:30am by Akkie

Calculus
I have not answered your question since I am somewhat puzzled by the wording of your question. by <<The radius of the balloon in feet is modeled by a twice-differentiable function of r of time t>> do you mean that r is a quadratic function of t, a cubic or what? As...
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 at 7:54pm by Reiny

Calculus (Continuity and Differentiability)
Okay. So I am given a graph of a derivative. From what I can gather, it looks like the function might be abs(x-2)-4. (I was not given an explicit function for g', just its graph.) The question then goes on to ask me: Is it possible, impossible, or certain that the function g ...
Saturday, November 12, 2011 at 3:43pm by Mishaka

calculus ap
If g is a differentiable function such that g(x) is less than 0 for all real numbers x and if f'(x)=(x2-4)g(x), which of the following is true?
Sunday, January 2, 2011 at 6:26pm by jane

Calculus
What is the state of the function f at x = 2? F(x) = [x^3 for x < 2; 5x - 2 for x > or = to 2] ?continuous or differentiable both or neither one or the other?
Friday, February 10, 2012 at 3:36pm by Scooby10

Calculus
A differentiable function f(x,y) has the property that f(2,2)=2 and fx(2,2)=1 and fy(2,2)=2. Find the equation of the tangent plane at the point on the surface z=f(x,y) where x=2, y=2.
Wednesday, October 17, 2012 at 9:32pm by Caroline

MATH
Where are the functions f1(x)=|sin(x)| and f2(x) = sin(|x|) differentiable? Use n as an arbitrary integer constant.) f1(x) = |sin(x)| is differentiable for all x ≠______________ f2(x) = sin(|x|) is differentiable for all x ≠______________ No one has answered
Monday, February 11, 2013 at 8:14pm by Selma

Calculous
let f be the function defined by |x-1|+2 for X<1 f(x)= ax^2-Bx, for X>or equal to 1. where a and b are constants a)if a=2 and b=3 is f continious for all x? justify your answer b)describe all the values of a and b for which f is a continious function c) For what values ...
Monday, November 21, 2011 at 12:42am by Yoona

AP Calculous
let f be the function defined by |x-1|+2 for X<1 f(x)= ax^2-Bx, for X>or equal to 1. where a and b are constants a)if a=2 and b=3 is f continious for all x? justify your answer b)describe all the values of a and b for which f is a continious function c) For what values ...
Monday, November 21, 2011 at 8:25am by Yoona

maths
prove that the following function is differentiable at x=0 using first principles: f(x)= e^x when x<0 x=1 when x>0 or x=0 also is f(x) differntiable for all real x?
Tuesday, December 1, 2009 at 7:29pm by kobe

Math
Where are the functions f1(x)=|sin(x)| and f2(x) = sin(|x|) differentiable? Use n as an arbitrary integer constant.) f1(x) = |sin(x)| is differentiable for all x ≠______________ f2(x) = sin(|x|) is differentiable for all x ≠______________
Monday, February 11, 2013 at 4:28pm by Amka

Calculus (Continuity and Differentiability)
I think that I may have confused you about the graph that I am dealing with. I know that if a corner is present in an original function, then it will not be differentiable at that point. I thoroughly understand this point. Now, the graph that I am given is the graph of the ...
Saturday, November 12, 2011 at 3:43pm by Mishaka

Calculus
1. For a differentiable function f, f' be the funcyion defined by f'(x) lim h->0 =f(x+h)-f(x-h)/(h) a: Determine f'(x) for f(x)=x b: Determine f'(x) for f(x)=x^2
Monday, October 29, 2012 at 2:31am by Rudy

Calculus
find all values of x for which function is differentiable. y=lnx^2 why is the answer= for all x doesn't equal 0?
Friday, October 29, 2010 at 12:42am by Jin

Calculus
Identify any x-values at which the absolute value function f(x) = 6 |x + 7|, is not continuous: x = _____ not differentiable: x = _____
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 at 7:41pm by Cesar

calculus
Consider the function f(x) = piecewise [(x^3)(cos(1/x)) , x=/=0], [0, x=0]. Use the definition of the derivative at a point to determine if f is differentiable at x=0 I am not sure how to start this question. Am I supposed to plug in x = 0?
Sunday, January 29, 2012 at 10:28pm by Daniel

math
Suppose that function f:[0,2]->R is continuous at [0,2], differentiable at (0,2) and such that f(0)=0, f(1)=1 and f(2)=1. a) Show that there is a x1 that belongs to (0,1) such that f'(x1)=1. b) Show that there is a x2 that belongs to (1,2) such that f'(x2)=0. c) Show that ...
Wednesday, January 16, 2013 at 3:02pm by Zisis

calculus
Let f be a differentiable function such that f(3) = 2 and f'(3) = 5. If the tangent line to the graph of f at x = 3 is used to find an approximation to a zero of f, that approximation is? So confused
Thursday, April 21, 2011 at 9:23pm by Matt

calculus
The function f is twice differentiable, and the graph of f has no points of inflection. If f(6)+3, f'(6)=-1/2, and f"(6)=-2, which of th following could be the value of f(7). A.)2 B.)2.5 C.)2.9 D.)3 E.)4 the answer is A. but what are the steps to reach this answer?
Tuesday, April 26, 2011 at 11:34pm by Confused

calculus 2
Suppose that you can calculate the derivative of a function using the formula f'(x) = 4f(x) + 2x. If the output value of the function at x= 4 is 2 estimate the value of the function at 4.013
Sunday, November 15, 2009 at 1:52pm by rimmel

economics
Suppose a monopolist faces production function Q = 3KL and demand function Q = 12 − P. Derive the input demand (as a function of Q, r and w) for capital and labor.
Thursday, March 31, 2011 at 11:54pm by Yash

Precalculus
Suppose f is a function with exponential decay. Explain why the function g defined by g(x)=1/f(x) is a function with exponential growth. PLEASE HELP!!
Wednesday, March 10, 2010 at 1:37am by jh

Calc ii
Let f be twice differentiable with (f(0)=4), (f(1)=8), and (f'(1)=6). Evaluate the integral from 0 to 1 of xf''(x)dx\). I have no clue how to approach this since we dont know what the function is? please help, I've finished every other question and the assignemnt is due at 9
Friday, October 4, 2013 at 6:58pm by Anonymous

Calculus
I need help creating an equation for a piecewise defined function with two different rules, that is continuous but not differentiable at the point where the rules change, x=3. Please help to justify the answer.
Wednesday, October 20, 2010 at 12:01am by Kelly

math
Thank you for your help :) "The piecewise function f(x)= n(x^3)-x______when____x<(or=to)1 =m(x^2)+5_______when_____x>(or=to)1 is differentiable everywhere. What is n? If you could explain step by step how to do this that would be great because I just do not see how to do...
Monday, January 17, 2011 at 8:52pm by APPRECIATIVE STUDENT

Calculus (Continuity and Differentiability)
Perhaps this from Wiki will help: "The absolute value function is continuous, but fails to be differentiable at x = 0 since the tangent slopes do not approach the same value from the left as they do from the right."
Saturday, November 12, 2011 at 3:43pm by Damon

Last two CALC questions. :)
8. If f(x) = sin(7 − 5x), find f′(π), which is the derivative at π: −0.754 −0.657 0 * 0.657 3.770 9. Given the function: g(x)={x+b, x<0 {cos(x), x≥0 Find the value of b, if any, that will make the function differentiable at x = 0. 0 1...
Friday, December 20, 2013 at 12:59am by Samantha

Calculus, check my answers, please! 3
Did I get these practice questions right? 1. Suppose that f is an even function whose domain is the set of all real numbers. Then which of the following can we claim to be true? ***The function f has an inverse f 1 that is even. The function f has an inverse f 1, but we can'...
Wednesday, October 2, 2013 at 12:28pm by Samantha

Calculus
Suppose that p(x) is the density function for heights of American men, in inches, and suppose that p(69)=0.22. Think carefully about what the meaning of this mathematical statement is. (a) Approximately what percent of American men are between 68.7 and 69.3 inches tall? b) ...
Friday, October 28, 2011 at 12:08am by Cesar

Calc
Suppose Y1 is a function of x which dy1/dx=3y1. Suppose y2 is a function of x which dy2/dx=8x+5. If the graphs of y1 and y2 have the same y-intercept and they intersect at x=2, then determine the value of the y-intercept.
Tuesday, October 11, 2011 at 8:15am by Andres

Calculus
Suppose that p(x) is the density function for heights of American men, in inches, and suppose that p(69)=0.22. Think carefully about what the meaning of this mathematical statement is. (a) Approximately what percent of American men are between 68.7 and 69.3 inches tall? b) ...
Thursday, October 27, 2011 at 9:59pm by Cesar

Calculus
Rolle's theorem states that a differentiable function that has equal values at two distinct points must have a point somewhere between them where the first derivative is zero. Rolle's theorem does not apply to that function in that interval, since f(x) decreases from 1 at x = ...
Sunday, March 6, 2011 at 7:56pm by drwls

Calculus
Sketch a graph of a function f(x) that is differentiable and that satisfies the following conditions. c) f'(-3) = 0 and f'(1) = 0 Please show me, step by step, how to sketch the problem!
Sunday, May 25, 2008 at 1:00pm by Anonymous

math
Hi would you please show how to know if the function is differentiable or not ? please show me the answer with examples
Tuesday, December 13, 2011 at 8:58am by jack

math
I dont understand this calculus problem at all. can someone show me step by step? Find all values of x for which the function is differentiable
Saturday, October 3, 2009 at 9:19pm by alison

Math Calculus
The MVT states that If f is continuous on [a,b] and differentiable on (a,b), then there exists a number c on (a,b) such that f'(c) = [f(b) - f(a)] / b - a In other words, the instantaneous slope must equal the average slope at some point c. (Your slope from two points will be ...
Monday, November 26, 2007 at 8:05pm by Michael

Calculus
It is given that a differentiable function f(x)=4x^3+kx^2-36x-15 (k is a constant) is decreasing on -3/2<x<2 and increasing on 2<x<5. Find the value of k and the turning point(s) of the curve y=f(x).
Friday, November 9, 2012 at 10:51am by Anonymous

Calculus
Oh, I am sorry! I had my calculator on radian mode instead of degree mode. Silly me. Thanks so much for the help! I think I have managed to do the remainder of the problem, except for part E. How would I be able to tell if that function were differentiable or not?
Friday, November 12, 2010 at 7:11pm by Sara

precalculus
Suppose f is an even function and g is an odd function such that the composition fog is defined.d show that fog is an even function
Sunday, September 23, 2012 at 3:14am by Fatima

Calculus
Given that f is a differentiable function with f(2,5) = 6, fx(2,5) = 1, and fy(2,5) = -1, use a linear approximation to estimate f(2.2,4.9). The answer is supposed to be 6.3. Here's what I've done so far: L(x,y) = f(2,5) + fx(2,5)(x) + fy(2,5)(y) L(x,y) = 6 + x - y L(2.2,4.9...
Sunday, September 30, 2012 at 11:23pm by James

precalculus
Suppose g is an even function and f is any function such that the composition fog is defined. show that fog is an even function
Sunday, September 23, 2012 at 3:10am by Fatima

Calculus, check my answers, please!
Could someone tell me if I'm right, and if not what the correct answer is? Thank you! I'd appreciate an explanation, too, if you could. :) 1. Suppose you're given the following table of values for the function f(x),and you're told that the function is even: x f(x...
Wednesday, October 2, 2013 at 11:11pm by Samantha

Math
suppose u and v are functions of x that are differentiable at x=2 and that u(2) =3, u'(2) = -4, v(2) = 1, and v'(2) find values of derivatives at x = 2 (d/dx)(uv) = ? I would like to know how to set this up because I'm only used to getting problems that want the d/dx given ex...
Tuesday, November 1, 2011 at 6:22pm by Amy

Computer Science - MATLAB
Same thing. I wounder if I'm suppose to be using the surfz function and not some other 3 dimensional plotting function?
Wednesday, July 20, 2011 at 2:59am by Lee

calc
Rules If differentiable, then continuous (hard to define derivative of a function at a point where it jumps) However if continuous, maybe differentiable maybe not. (example of not is |x| at x = 0 so 1. is true 2. not always 3. is true logic relation of q 1 to q 3 if a cow, ...
Sunday, December 9, 2012 at 8:59pm by Damon

calculus
sketch graph of a function f that is differentiable and that satisfies the following conditions:(1)f'(x)>0, when x<-5 (2)f'(x)<0, when -5<x<1 and when x>1 (3)f'(-5) =0and f'(1)=0 (4)f(-5)=6and f(1)=2.
Thursday, March 24, 2011 at 1:49pm by Anonymous

Calculus
To see if Rolle's theorem applies, check 1. if the function is continuous on the closed interval [a, b]. 2. if it is differentiable on the open interval (a,b). Furthermore, 3. check if f(a)=f(b). If all the above conditions are satisfied, then there exists some value c between...
Saturday, October 30, 2010 at 3:51pm by MathMate

Algebra
Suppose H(x)=(sqrt5x+3). Find two functions f and g such that (fog)(x)= H(x) . f(x)= g(x)= Neither function can be the identity function. (There may be more than one correct answer.)
Friday, February 4, 2011 at 6:04am by Janet

Calc
Various values for the derivative, f'(x), of a differentiable function f are shown below. x=1, f'(x) = 8 x=2, f'(x) = 4 x=3, f'(x) = 0 x=4, f'(x) = -4 x=5, f'(x) = -8 x=6, f'(x) = -12 If f'(x) always decreases, then which of the following statements must be true? A) f(x) has a...
Friday, January 21, 2011 at 12:26am by Erica

calculus
A critical number (or critical point) of a function is a point a within its domain at which f'(a)=0 or at which f'(a) is undefined, i.e. where f(a) is not differentiable at a. First, find the domain of f(x). Since it is a polynomial, its domain is (-∞∞), or ℝ...
Saturday, March 26, 2011 at 1:40pm by MathMate

one more graph question
Hopefull the last one. :) Sketch the graph of a differentiable function y = f(x) with this property: A local minimum value that is greater than one of its local maximum values
Sunday, November 5, 2006 at 10:26pm by Jen

Calculus
I don't understand what the graph is suppose to show and what the integral equation is suppose to mean. How would I use the graph to answer the questions? f is the differentiable function whose graph is shown in the figure. The position at time t (sec) of a particle moving ...
Sunday, May 20, 2007 at 11:02pm by Anonymous

pre calc
The Identity Function The Squaring Function The Cubing Function The Reciprocal Function The Square Root Function The Exponential Functional Lo The Natural Logarithum Function The Sine Function The Cosine Function The Absolute Value Function The Greatest Integer Function The ...
Friday, December 18, 2009 at 11:09am by kim

Micro econ
1: Suppose John had a utility function of U=X^2/3Y^1/3 . Derive Johns demand function from his utility function showing all the necessary steps. i know that the MUx=MUy and first i derive the equation to 2/3X^-1/3 1/3Y^-2/3 then im stuck i need help with the simplification
Tuesday, September 18, 2007 at 11:39pm by Brett

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