Friday
April 18, 2014

Search: specific heat

Number of results: 17,069

Chemistry Science
A piece of iron with a mass of 35 g is heated to 1305oC and then placed in a calorimeter containing 600 g of water. The temperature of the water increases from 25oc to 33oC. The specific heat of water is 4.184 J/g X C. Calculate the specific heat of the iron.
Sunday, May 27, 2012 at 9:41pm by vvfrn

Phyics
How much energy is required to change a 57 g ice cube from ice at −4◦C to steam at 107◦C? The specific heat of ice is 2090 J/kg ◦ C and of water 4186 J/kg ◦ C. The latent heat of fusion of water is 3.33 105 J/kg, its latent heat of ...
Monday, July 8, 2013 at 7:12pm by Beatles Lover

Chemisrty
heat required is q. q = mass water x specific heat water x delta T. Now all you need is the heat released when a mole of CaCl2 dissolves.
Tuesday, February 23, 2010 at 1:33am by DrBob222

college chemistry
Calculate the amount of heat required to heat 80 grams of water from 10 to 53C. The specific heat capacity for water is 4.184 J/gC.
Tuesday, September 7, 2010 at 12:45am by summer

Physical Science
Calculate the amount of heat required to heat a 45 sample of ethanol from 11.0 to 19.0. Specific heat capacity of ethanol is 2.42 .
Tuesday, October 19, 2010 at 12:19pm by Lechile

college chem
In this experiment a hot metal block at 100oC is added to cold water in a calorimeter. The heat lost by the metal block equals the heat gained by the water and the two end up at the same temperature. In one experiment, the mass of the metal block is 89.5 grams, the volume of ...
Thursday, October 8, 2009 at 4:30pm by Sarah

mechanical systems
heat= mass*sepcificheat capcity*changetemp I dont know if you can find the specific heat capacity for water in SAE units. So here it is : specific heat capacity water= 1BTU./lb-degF now convert 1500 gallons water to lbs...That depends on temperature, so take the starting ...
Sunday, April 15, 2012 at 10:03pm by bobpursley

chemistry
heat lost by hot water + heat gained by cold water + heat gained by calorimeter = 0 [mass hot water x specific heat water x (Tfinal - Tinitial)] + [mass cold water x specific heat water x (Tf-Ti)] + Cp(Tf-Ti) = 0. Solve for Cp.
Tuesday, March 1, 2011 at 3:56pm by DrBob222

10th geade Chem
q1 = heat to move ice at -25C to zero C. q1 = mass ice x specific heat ice x (25) q2 = heat to melt ice at zero C to liquid water at zero C. q2 = mass ice x heat fusion. q3 = heat to move liquid water at zero C to 30C. q3 = mass water x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial) ...
Monday, February 28, 2011 at 5:51pm by DrBob222

physics
You will need to know these numbers: specific heat of ice = 2.09 J/gC specific heat of water = 4.18 J/gC heat of fusion (melting) of ice: 334 J/g Total Heat required = Q = energy reqd to heat 500 g ice from -10 to 0 C + energy reqd. to melt 500 g of ice @ 0 C + energy ...
Monday, October 15, 2012 at 12:41am by drwls

college chem
calculate the amount of energy (in kj) necessary to convert 457 g of liquid water from 0 Celecius to water vapor at 167 celcius. the molar heat of vaporization (Hvap) of water is 40.79 jk/mol. the specific heat for water is 4.187 j/g celcius and for steam 1.99 j/mol celcius. (...
Monday, February 4, 2013 at 11:03pm by luis fernandez

ap chemistry
heat evolved = q = mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial) heat/g = q/3.5
Wednesday, October 31, 2012 at 5:31pm by DrBob222

chemistry
An 8.6 g sample of a metal is heated to 110.0oC and then placed in a coffee cup calorimeter containing 125 g of water at a temperature of 23.00oC. After the metal cools, the final temperature of the metal and water is 26.83oC. Assuming that no heat is lost to the surroundings ...
Wednesday, August 3, 2011 at 3:29pm by TI

Science
A lead bullet with a mass of 8.50 g traveling at 4.80 x 102 m/s strikes a 2.00 kg block of wood and is embedded in it. Both the bullet and the block are initially at 25.0C. Assume that no heat is lost to the surroundings and that all the kinetic energy of the bullet is ...
Tuesday, December 6, 2011 at 9:40pm by Michael

Chemistry
118 g of a metal at 82.0C are added to 50.0 g of water at 31.1C. When the system reaches constant temperature, the temperature is 40.0C. What is the specific heat of the metal? The specific heat of water is 4.184 J/gC.
Monday, March 8, 2010 at 4:26pm by Tiffany

Chemistry
94.0 g of a metal at 88.0C are added to 55.0 g of water at 26.0C. When the system reaches constant temperature, the temperature is 39.3C. What is the specific heat of the metal? The specific heat of water is 4.184 J/gC.
Monday, March 8, 2010 at 4:28pm by Megan

Physics
c is specific heat capacity for water, r is specific heat of vaporizatrion. Q =ΔU1+ΔU2= mcΔT +rm= m(cΔT +r) =0.03( 4.1910^3(100-62)+22.610^5) =72577 J
Friday, March 30, 2012 at 1:23pm by Elena

Physics
If 400 gm of aluminum are put into 200 gm of water at 20 C in 110 gr. calorimeter of specific heat .093, and the temp.or stable equilibrium is 28.8 C, what is the initial temperature of the aluminum? specific heat of aluminum is .22..
Wednesday, December 5, 2012 at 8:24pm by Lambo

science
The answer still is the same. Calcualte the heat stored in the 1 kg water and 1 kg gold and you will know which can produce the most heat to the bed. q = mass x specific heat x T
Saturday, September 8, 2007 at 6:27pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
This is a heat problem, not a chemical problem so it really makes no difference at all about the identity of the acid or base. q = mass fluid x specific heat fluid x (Tfinjal-Tinitial) q is what you solve for. mass = 195 mL = 195 g with since density is 1.00 g/mL. specific ...
Saturday, March 29, 2014 at 8:47pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
q = mass x specific heat x (Tf - Ti). q, specific heat and Tf and Ti are given. Calculate mass. Show your work if you need further assistance. Check my thinking.
Tuesday, November 20, 2007 at 5:16pm by DrBob222

Chemistry HEAT OF FUSION
heat added to ice to melt it + heat added to melt at zero C to final T + heat lost by hot water = 0 heat added to ice to melt it is mass ice x heat fusion. heat added to melt at zero to final T is mass melt x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial) heat lost by hot water is ...
Thursday, October 6, 2011 at 1:35pm by DrBob222

chemistry
q = mass x specific heat x delta T. mass = 100 g (I assume we assume the density of the solution is 1.00 g/mL). specific heat = 4.184 J/g*C delta T = 26.0 - 22.5 = ?? q will be in Joules and you will need to convert to kJ.
Wednesday, January 20, 2010 at 10:53pm by DrBob222

ap chemistry
q = mass x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial) q = 6450 joules. mass = only unknown specific heat = 4.20 J/g Tfinal = 40.0 Tinitial= 25.4 Note the correct spelling of celsius.
Friday, September 24, 2010 at 7:11pm by DrBob222

physic-heat
the specific heat of water is one of the highest of all substances.why does this make water a useful liquid to use in hot water bottles? and could you use a lump of nickel to warm your bed instead of a hot water bottle?which would be better? why? I will be happy to crititque ...
Sunday, April 8, 2007 at 10:04am by Pauline

Chemistry
Calculate the total quantity of heat required to convert 25.0 g of liquid CCl4(l) from 25.0C to gaseous CCl4 at 76.8C (the normal boiling point for CCl4)? The specific heat of CCl4(l) is its heat of fusion is and its heat of vaporization is
Tuesday, April 13, 2010 at 7:32pm by Bob

CHEMISTRY
And a density of 1.00 g/mL. 140 mL = 140 g liquid. q = mass water x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial) = 0 You have mass and specific heat as well as Tf and Ti. solve for q. That is the heat generated. It is delta H, dH. dH/0.007 mol gives dH/mol AgCl.
Monday, April 30, 2012 at 11:21pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
You don't have a question. I assume you want to determine the change in T of the air. heat lost by ethanol + heat gained by air = 0 [mass ethanol x specific heat ethanol x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass air x specific heat air x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute the values from ...
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at 4:44pm by DrBob222

Chem
Yes, I saw the water. I didn't give you the straight dope. You were mixed up, I thought, but not how I suggested. I have copied your response here. 270.9(33.2-71.3)+4.184*264.6* (33.2-16.9)=0 The 270.9(33.2-71.3) is correct BUT you must multiply that by the specific heat of ...
Monday, March 18, 2013 at 4:57pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
q1 = heat necessary to change ice from -10 to zero = mass x specific heat ice x (Tfinal - Tinitial) where Tfinal is zero and Tinitial is -10. q2 = heat necessary to melt ice but stay at zero = mass x heat fusion of ice. q3= heat necessary to heat water at zero to 25 C. = mass ...
Monday, December 24, 2007 at 5:25pm by DrBob222

chemistry
[mass burner x specific heat burner x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass H2O x speific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute and solve for specific heat burner which is the only unknown in the equation..
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 at 10:37am by DrBob222

chem 211
heat gained by cool water + heat lost by warm water = 0 [mass cool H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass warm H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute and solve for Tfinal, the only unknown in that string. But common sense tells you that you ...
Tuesday, November 5, 2013 at 3:33pm by DrBob222

Chemistry I
Heat gained by water + heat lost by water = 0. unknown mass H2O x specific heat x (Tf-Ti) + known mass water x specific heat x (Tf-Ti) = 0 Tf = final T Ti = initial T. You have only one unknown; i.e., unknown mass H2O. Post your work if you get stuck.
Sunday, October 12, 2008 at 6:16pm by DrBob222

Physics
A 100 kg steam boiler is made of steel and contains 200 kg of water at 5.00C. How much heat is required to raise the temperature of both the boiler and water to 100C? The specific heat of Steel is 0.115kcal/kgC. The specific heat of Water is 1.00kcal/kgC
Monday, April 2, 2012 at 11:54am by Madison

Note! NOTE annonymous.
I made a horrible mistake. I used the specific heat of water when the problem clearly says it is ice going from -30 to -15. It should be q = mass x specific heat x (Tf-Ti_ q = 150 x 2.05 J/g*C x (15) q = 4.61 kJ and your answer is correct.
Friday, June 22, 2012 at 11:34am by DrBob222

General Chemistry
heat lost by Cu + heat gained by H2O = 0. [(mass Cu x specific heat Cu x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [(mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0
Sunday, June 3, 2012 at 4:53pm by DrBob222

chem
The specific heat of silver is 0.237 J/goC Its melting point is 961oC . Its heat of fusion is 11 J/g. How much heat (in J) is needed to change 17.5 g of silver from solid at 25oC to liquid at 961oC ? Add the heat required to warm the silver from room temp to the mp. Then add ...
Tuesday, October 31, 2006 at 7:59pm by mary

Physics
Heat is transferred from the two added blocks to the water and calorimeter. You can calculate that amount of heat from the increase in temperature. Set it equal to the heat lost by the two added blocks, and solve for the unknown specific heat of the second sample.
Tuesday, November 30, 2010 at 8:44am by drwls

chemistry
1. a) 50ml of water at 46.9C were mixed with 50ml of water at 25.1C in a calorimeter also at 25.1C. The final temperature was 30.1C. Assuming that neither the density of water nor its specific heat capacity change with temperature, calculate the total heat capacity of the ...
Monday, November 12, 2012 at 2:21pm by Cicily

Chemistry
q = mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial) Use 1 cal/g*C for specific heat for the answer in calories; use 4.184 J/g*C for the answer in joules.
Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 9:04pm by DrBob222

chemistry
q1 = heat to melt 8.5 g ice. q1 = mass ice x heat fusion. q2 = heat to raise T melted ice to Tfinal q2 = mass melted ice x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tintial) q3 = heat lost by 255 g H2O q3 = mass water x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial) q1 + q2 + q3 = 0 Solve for ...
Sunday, October 23, 2011 at 12:23pm by DrBob222

Science
Assume you can heat water with perfect insulation (all the heat from combustion of ethanol is transferred to water). What is the volume of ethanol required to heat 100 mL of water by 10 degrees C? (You will need to look up density of ethanol, specific heat capacity or water, ...
Thursday, March 21, 2013 at 2:08am by Alexandra

chemistry
[mass benzene x heat fusion benzene] + [mass benzene x specific heat benzene x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass steam x heat vaporization of water] + [mass water@100 x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Check my thinking.
Wednesday, February 24, 2010 at 2:08am by DrBob222

Chemistry
heat gained by cool H2O + heat lost by warm H2O = 0 [mass cool H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)[ + [mass warm H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute and solve for Tf.
Thursday, March 14, 2013 at 4:23pm by DrBob222

Chemistry #2
heat gained by cool water + heat lost by warm water = 0 [mass cool H2O x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass warm H2O x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute and solve for Tfinal.
Sunday, April 14, 2013 at 9:31pm by DrBob222

chemistry
x = grams of ice x times heat of fusion of water in cal/gram = grams of water * specific heat of water in cal/deg gm * (25-5) ------------ That assumes that the ice is separated from the water. If they mix then the ice not only has to melt but also be raised from 0 to 5. Then...
Wednesday, January 27, 2010 at 3:10pm by Damon

science
Your answer to the first question is correct. For part 2, you need to used the specific heat C, the mass M, and the temperature rise (delta T = 23 C) The specific heat of water is C = 4.184 J/(deg*gram) Q = M*C*(delta T) = 100*4.184*23 = ___ J
Monday, January 9, 2012 at 1:51am by drwls

Chemistry
Compounds like CCL2F2 are known as chloroflourocarbons, or CFCs. These compounds were once widely used as refrigerants but are now being replaced by compounds that are believed to be less harmful to the environment. The heat of vaporization of CCl2F2 is 289J/g. What mass of ...
Thursday, December 14, 2006 at 10:45pm by Jenn

Chemistry
You must calculate the heat evolved in stages, then add all of the heats together to obtain the sum. Here is the way you go about it. q1 = heat lost in moving the vapor from the starting point to the boiling point. q1 = mass vapor x specific heat vapor x (Tfinal-Tinitial) ...
Saturday, June 12, 2010 at 2:20pm by DrBob222

physics
From what temperature to what temperature? How much ethanol? If you are not vaporizing it, multiply the mass of ethanol by the specific heat of the liquid and the temperature increase. ethanol specific heat = 2.44 kJ/(kgK)
Wednesday, July 21, 2010 at 5:22pm by drwls

chemistry
q1 = heat removed to convert steam at 145 C to steam at 100 C. q1 = mass x specific heat steam x (Tfinal-Tinitial)-----where Tf is 100 and Ti = 145. q2 = heat removed to convert steam at 100 to water at 100 C. q2 = mass steam x heat vaporization q3 = heat removed to convert ...
Friday, August 27, 2010 at 4:37pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
46.9 g of a substance at 90.8C is added to 51.8 g of water at 24.8C. The final temperature of the water and substance is 40.5C. The specific heat of water is 4.184 J/gC. What is the specific heat of the substance? I think the equation that I need to use for this is C=Q/m...
Monday, March 8, 2010 at 4:25pm by Tiffany

Chem
From solid at the start to the melting point, heat required is q1 = mass x specific heat solid x (Tfinal-Tinitial) At the melting point, q for melting is q2 = mass solid x heat fusion From the melting point to the boiling point, q for heating the liquid phase is q3 = mass x ...
Friday, September 2, 2011 at 11:23am by DrBob222

science
a sliver coin and a gold coin each have a mass of exactly 6.6 grams the specific heat of sliver is 0.235j/g.degrees celcius and the specific heat of gold his 0.130j/g. degrees celcius what coin requires more heat to raise its tempreature by 40 degrees celcius
Tuesday, March 1, 2011 at 4:24pm by nikita

cHEM
$625/oz x ?oz = $5,000 Solve for ?oz ?oz x 31.1 g/oz = x grams. q = grams x specific heat Au x (Tfinal-Tinitial) Make sure mass and specific heat are in the same units.
Friday, October 19, 2012 at 1:10pm by DrBob222

Chemisty
q1 = heat to move ice from -25 C to zero C. q1 = mass ice x specific heat ice x delta T. q2 = heat to melt ice (change H2O solid to H2O liquid at zero degrees.) q2 = mass ice x heat fusion. q3 = heat to move liquid water from zero degrees C to 100 C. q3 = mass x specific heat ...
Thursday, April 8, 2010 at 11:17am by DrBob222

Chem
q1 = heat needed to raise T from zero C to 100 C for the liquid. q1 = mass H2O x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial). q2 = heat needed to vaporize liquid water at 100 C to steam at 100 C. q2 = mass H2O x heat vap q3 = heat needed to raise steam from 100 C to 154 C. q3 = mass ...
Saturday, February 4, 2012 at 9:46pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
q at a phase change = mass x heat vaporization for liquid to gas or mass x heat fusion for solid to liquid. For example, to change water from liquid at 100 C to steam at 100 C is mass H2O x heat vaporization. q within a single phase is mass x specific heat in that phase x (...
Friday, April 20, 2012 at 8:11pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
heat lost by warm water + heat gained by cool water = 0 [mass warm H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinnitial)] + [mass cool water x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0. Solve for Tfinal
Saturday, February 9, 2013 at 3:35pm by DrBob222

chem
Recall that the heat absorbed (+) or released (-) by a substance is given by Q = mc(T2 - T1) where m = mass (g) c = specific heat capacity (J/g-K) T2 = final temperature T1 = initial temperature Note that in the problem, the source of energy or heat came from the alloy. Thus ...
Thursday, October 17, 2013 at 11:55am by Jai

Chemistry
q1=heat to move ice from -25 to zero C. (Not the correct spelling of celsius). q1 = mass ice x specific heat ice x (Tfinal-Tinitial). Tfinal = zero and Tinitial = -25 q2 = heat to melt ice at zero to liquid water at zero c. q2 = mass ice x heat fusion q3 = heat to move water ...
Saturday, July 31, 2010 at 2:49pm by DrBob222

chemistry
heat gained by cool water + heat lost by warm water + heat lost by calorimeter = 0 [mass cool water x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass warm water x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + Ccal x (Tfinal-Tinitial) = 0 Substitute FIRST, then solve for Ccal.
Monday, March 26, 2012 at 4:07pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Calculate q for the heat required to heat the soup. q = mass x specific heat H2O x delta T. q = ?? in Joules. Then use E = hc/wavelength to determine the energy per photon. Go from there. Post your work if you get stuck. Check my thinking.
Monday, October 13, 2008 at 7:48pm by DrBob222

chemistry
The easiest way to do this is to do it in steps. q1 = heat to move steam from 121.5 to 100. q1 = mass x specific heat steam x delta T. q2 = heat to condense steam at 100 C to liquid water at 100. q2 = mass x heat vaporization. q3 = heat to move liquid water at 100 C to liquid ...
Monday, January 25, 2010 at 9:05pm by DrBob222

physics
calculate the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of a 5kg block of solid platinum from 0 degrees celsius to 25 degrees celsius. the specific heat of platinum is 133j/kg k. how much heat energy is required to raise 5kg of water by the same amount? the ...
Saturday, January 8, 2011 at 11:59am by charlie

chemistry Ap
q = mass x specific heat x (Tf - Ti). q = 50.0 g x specific heat Al x (125-25). You will need to look up the specific heat of Al metal. The units should be in Joules/gram. If the units are in J/mol, then you must change the 50.0 g Al to mols Al by dividing 50 by atomic mass Al...
Friday, February 8, 2008 at 11:41pm by drbob222

Chemistry 1150
heat lost by warm water + heat gained by cool water = 0 [mass warm water x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass cool H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Solve for Tfinal. Watch the units.
Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 9:14pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
1. mass ice x heat fusion ice to melt ice. 2. mass water from ice x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial) to heat water from ice. 3. water there initially loses heat. mass x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial)
Sunday, February 28, 2010 at 11:06pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
heat to melt ice cube 1 + heat t melt ice cube 2 + heat to raise T ice melted ice cubes from zero to final T + heat lost by 275 g H2O = 0. heat to melt ice cube 1 = mass x heat fusion. heat t melt ice cube 2 = mass x heat fusion. heat to raise water from 20 g ice cubes from ...
Saturday, July 9, 2011 at 3:10pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
heat lost by Cu = heat gained by H2O. q = heat gained by water = mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial). OR, heat lost by Cu is mass Cu x specific heat Cu x (Tfinal-Tinitial)
Wednesday, November 30, 2011 at 12:44pm by DrBob222

chemistry
q1 = heat to raise T of solid to zero C. q1 = mass ice x specific heat ice x delta T. q2 = heat to melt ice at zero C to water at zero C. q2 = mass ice x heat fusion q3 = heat to raise T of liquid water from zero C to liquid water at 100 C. q3 = mass water x specific heat H2O ...
Saturday, October 20, 2012 at 9:32pm by DrBob222

physics 2 **
The heat lost by the horseshoe equals the heat gained by th water. Write an equation that says this and solve it for the final temperature. They should have told you what the horseshoe is made of, because you will need to know its specific heat.
Thursday, December 4, 2008 at 11:55pm by drwls

chemistry
q = [mass stainless x specific heat stainless x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-initial)] Substitute and solve for q. You will need to look up the specific heats of stainless and H2O. Tfinal is 10 and Tinitial is 38.7
Saturday, September 28, 2013 at 12:33pm by DrBob222

Physics
What rise in temperature occurs when 10g of steam at 100 degree celcius are passed into 400g of water at 10 degrees celcius taking the specific heat capacity of water to be 4.2J/gK and specific latent heat of vapourisation of steam to be 2268J/g
Sunday, January 16, 2011 at 2:26am by Sarah

chemistry
heat lost by warm water + heat gained by cool water = 0 [mass warm water x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass cool water x specific heat water x T(final-Tinitial)] = 0 Solve for Tfinal.
Wednesday, November 2, 2011 at 8:25pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
heat gained by cool water + heat lost by warm water = 0 [mass cool water x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass warm water x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute and solve for Tfinal.
Friday, November 11, 2011 at 2:30pm by DrBob222

chemistry
heat loss of warm water + heat gained by cool water = 0 [mass warm water x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass cool water x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute and solve for Tfinal.
Sunday, April 21, 2013 at 10:55pm by DrBob222

chemistry
[mass1 water x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass2 water x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitla)] = 0
Friday, October 29, 2010 at 1:19am by DrBob222

Chemistry
q1 = heat to raise T of solid ice from -8 to zero C. q1 = mass ice x specific ice x (Tf - Ti) where Tf is 0 C and Ti is -8 C. q2 = heat to melt ice at zero C to liquid H2O at zero C. q2 = mass ice x heat fusion q3 = heat to raise water from zero C to final T. q3 = mass H2O x ...
Saturday, November 3, 2012 at 8:04pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Search: How much energy (in Kj) is relased when 25.0g of ethanol vapor at 93, is cooled to -10? Ethanol has a melting point of -114.5, bp of 78.4, specific heat= 2.10J/g, heat of fusion =4.60Kj/mol, specicic heat= 1.9j/g, heat of vaporization = 38.56Kj/mol
Tuesday, September 27, 2011 at 9:49pm by Oscar

OSU
120 of is initially at room temperature (22). A chilled steel rod at 2 is placed in the water. If the final temperature of the system is 21.0, what is the mass of the steel bar? Specific heat of water = 4.18 Specific heat of steel = 0.452
Sunday, October 31, 2010 at 5:06pm by Anonymous

CHEMISTRY
90.0 of is initially at room temperature (22.0). A chilled steel rod at 2.0 is placed in the water. If the final temperature of the system is 21.3, what is the mass of the steel bar? Specific heat of water = 4.18 Specific heat of steel = 0.452
Thursday, October 27, 2011 at 9:23pm by MARYD

Chemistry
Your post doesn't make a lot of sense. Record the mass of a metal as 84.0 degrees C? Here's what you would do. mmetal x specific heat metal x (29.0-84.0) + [mw x 4.184 x (29.0-26.0) = 0 and solve for specific heat metal.
Tuesday, October 9, 2012 at 11:40pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
I believe this is E2-E1 = delta E = q+w dE = 7495 w is -346 q = 7495+346 = ? Then q = mass gas x specific heat gas x (Tfinal-Tinitial) Solve for specific heat gas.
Tuesday, October 22, 2013 at 6:16pm by DrBob222

CHEMISTRY
It's best to work this in stages. q1 = heat released in moving steam from 194 C to 100 C. q1 = mass x specific heat steam x (Tfinal-Tinitial) q2 = heat released to condense steam at 100 C to liquid water at 100 C. q2 = mass steam x heat vaporixation. q3 = heat released to move...
Tuesday, November 2, 2010 at 11:41pm by DrBob222

chemistry
heat lost by Fe + heat gained by H2O = 0 [mass Fe x specific heat Fe x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial) = 0 Substitute and solve for Tinitial for Fe.
Thursday, December 1, 2011 at 11:07pm by DrBob222

chemistry
heat gained by rod + heat lost by H2O = 0 [mass rod x specific heat rod x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute and solve for mass rod
Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 10:28pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
[mass ice cubes x specific heat ice x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass ice cubes x heat fusion H2O)] + [mass melted ice cubes x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass water x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute and solve for Tfinal.
Monday, September 10, 2012 at 11:48pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Of course not. Use density as in mass = volume x density to convert the volumes in the problem to grams. The specific heat is either given in the problem or it will be in your text/notes. I don't have specific heat tables memorized although I remember that H2O is 4.184 J/g*C ...
Wednesday, February 22, 2012 at 8:00pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
A coffee cup calorimeter contains 25.0 grams water at 23.8 C A 5.00g sample of an unknown metal at an initial temperature of 78.3 C was dropped into the calorimeter. The final temperature of mixture was 46.3 C. Calculate the specific heat of the metal. The specific heat of ...
Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 8:14pm by J

Chemistry
q for ice at -20 to ice at 0. q = mass x specific heat ice x delta T (dT = 20). q to melt the ice is q = mass ice x heat fusion. q to heat from zero to 95. q = mass H2O x specific heat H2O x dT and dT = 95. Then sum the q values.
Thursday, February 6, 2014 at 8:43pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
How many kilograms of water at 15oC can be heated to 95oC by burning 143 grams of methane, CH4, assuming that 100% of the heat is used to heat the water. The heat of combustion of methane is 891 kJ per mole of methane. (The specific heat of water is 4.184 J/goC.) I am not sure...
Monday, January 30, 2012 at 8:35pm by Hannah

chemistry
using the values for heat of fusion, specific heat of water, or heat of vaporization, calculate the amount of heat energy. Calories needed to warm 20.0g of water at 15 degrees Celsius to 72 degrees Celsius (one step) Show work please
Sunday, October 3, 2010 at 9:23pm by matt

chemistry
Can specific heat be negative? I know energy can be (as in joules or calories) because when something cools down the temperature difference is a negative, and because the energy is an important part of the formula for specific heat, couldn't it be negative? Specific heat ...
Sunday, October 22, 2006 at 6:07pm by Fido

chemistry
100 mL of is initially at room temperature (22)C. A chilled steel rod at 2 C is placed in the water. If the final temperature of the system is 21.2 C, what is the mass of the steel bar? Specific heat of water = 4.18J/g(C) Specific heat of steel = 0.452J/g(C)
Monday, October 20, 2008 at 4:09am by Lilit

college
105 of is initially at room temperature (22). A chilled steel rod at 2 is placed in the water. If the final temperature of the system is 21.3, what is the mass of the steel bar? Specific heat of water = 4.18 Specific heat of steel = 0.452
Sunday, October 31, 2010 at 5:06pm by Philadelphia University

Chemistry
Note the correct spelling of celsius. q1 = heat to move ice from -10 to zero. q1 = mass ice x specific heat ice x (Tfinal-Tinitial) = 25 x ?? x [0-(-10)] q2 = heat to melt the ice at zero C to liquid water at zero C. q2 = mass ice x heat fusion. q3 = heat to move liquid water ...
Wednesday, January 12, 2011 at 1:57am by DrBob222

Science
q = mass ice x specific heat ice x delta T. q = 7800 calories. mass = unknown you will need to look up specific heat solid ice. delta T = 40.
Tuesday, May 13, 2008 at 6:22pm by DrBob222

chemistry
heat lost by alloy + heat gained by water = 0 [mass alloy x specific heat alloy x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass water x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0
Wednesday, May 19, 2010 at 10:56pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Here is a general scheme for any temperature range. heat WITHIN a phase is q = mass substance x specific heat in that phase (Tfinal-Tinitial) heat at a phase change. q = mass x heat fusion at freezing(melting point) q = mass x heat vaporization at boiling point. So you go ...
Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 12:41am by DrBob222

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