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April 23, 2014

Search: phys. science

Number of results: 442

classroom instruction 9not sure if i am right)
Yes -- if those are in the phys ed guidelines. Remember, this is what the state feels kids should know by the end of 4th grade. That means that their phys ed classes in the earlier grades are leading up to these competencies.
Friday, February 19, 2010 at 8:52pm by Ms. Sue

science
Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. Here are some sites for you: 1. http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/CLASS/newtlaws/u2l3a.html 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton's_laws_of_motion 3. http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/history/newton3laws.html ...
Wednesday, October 24, 2007 at 9:50am by SraJMcGin

Physics
This may help. It describes a way of using critical point properties to apply the Van der Waals equation of state: http://www.phys.uri.edu/~gerhard/PHY525/tln30.pdf
Friday, February 24, 2012 at 4:36pm by drwls

Science
Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. I hope some of the following will help you: 1. http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/CLASS/estatics/u8l2a.html 2. (by conduction): http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/phys/Class/estatics/u8l2c.html
Monday, November 5, 2007 at 8:18pm by SraJMcGin

science
Check these sites. http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/history/newton3laws.html http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/history/newtongrav.html
Tuesday, January 22, 2008 at 5:58pm by Ms. Sue

pre-calc
a bit outside my expertise, but this page seems to fit in quite nicely with your problem. http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/stars/magnitudes.html
Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 1:40pm by Reiny

Biology
The first and third laws are best stated in words. I suggest you review them at http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/history/newton3laws.html . The second law is simply Force = (mass) x (acceleration).
Saturday, August 15, 2009 at 8:19am by drwls

chemistry
Here is a site that provides solubility data versus temperature. Scroll down about 1/4 of the page and look for the KCl curve. http://galileo.phys.virginia.edu/education/outreach/8thgradesol/TempSolubility.htm
Sunday, May 16, 2010 at 8:41pm by DrBob222

science
Here is a reasonable place to start: http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/history/newtongrav.html It probably tells you more than you want to know.
Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 12:39am by drwls

chemistry
Here is a graph that will give you the information to calculate that value. http://galileo.phys.virginia.edu/education/outreach/8thgradesol/TempSolubility.htm
Thursday, January 20, 2011 at 5:52pm by DrBob222

Physics
Apply Kepler's third law for the solar system. With radius R in a.u. and period in years, R^3/P^2 = 1 = constant for all orbiting objects http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/history/kepler.html
Tuesday, September 20, 2011 at 10:37pm by drwls

science
Kepler's third law says that R^3/P^2 = constant. http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/history/kepler.html We can choose to measure P in years and the orbital radius R in a.u. In your case, the ratio (R^3/26^2) = 1^3/1^2 = 1 R^3 = 676 R = 8.8 a.u.
Tuesday, January 11, 2011 at 1:08am by drwls

Physics - Newton's Law of universal gravitation
http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/history/newtongrav.html
Sunday, August 22, 2010 at 2:38pm by bobpursley

engineering physihcs
http://phoenix.phys.clemson.edu/tutorials/excel/graph.html
Saturday, February 12, 2011 at 7:36pm by bobpursley

Astronomy - help!
http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/mainseq/mainseq.html Look at the time graph, on the vertical scale find 10^3 million years, then go downward to the horizontal scale and read the answer.
Wednesday, October 29, 2008 at 7:51pm by bobpursley

URGENT! PLEASE HELP QUICK PHYSICS
http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/history/einstein.html
Wednesday, January 15, 2014 at 1:37pm by bobpursley

PHYSICS
The problem is worked out on page 10 of http://www.phys.lsu.edu/classes/fall2007/phys2001-24/lecture19.pdf where a better figure is shown.
Monday, January 10, 2011 at 7:59am by drwls

CHEMISTRY
c = fw c = speed of light = 3E8 m/s f = frequency in Hz\ w = wavelength in m. Here is a site that will help you identify the section of electromagnetic spectrum.http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/light/spectrum.html
Friday, September 7, 2012 at 8:46pm by DrBob222

Science
Equilibrium constants do not provide rate data. They may want you to assume that chemical equilbrium is established overnight, and assume a unimolecular process, with equilibrium constant K. http://www.uic.edu/classes/phys/phys461/phys450/ANJUM06/ Ignore the jibberish of ...
Thursday, March 10, 2011 at 1:16am by drwls

astronomy
Earths temperature averaged over the year is about 300 Kelvin. At what wavelength does it radiate most strongly? What part of the electromagnetic spectrum does this wavelength lie in? Can you see it? http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/light/planck.html
Monday, April 16, 2007 at 8:55pm by rohan

Chemistry
http://galileo.phys.virginia.edu/classes/252/kinetic_theory.html
Thursday, October 7, 2010 at 10:33pm by DrBob222

science
= f / N, where is the coefficient of friction, f is the amount of force that resists motion, and N is the normal force f=N ma=mg cancel m on both side: a=g http://ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/211_fall2002.web.dir/ben_townsend/staticandkineticfriction.htm
Wednesday, September 15, 2010 at 11:16am by TutorCat

Chemistry
http://galileo.phys.virginia.edu/education/outreach/8thgradesol/TempSolubility.htm
Monday, June 7, 2010 at 8:16am by DrBob222

Biology
http://galileo.phys.virginia.edu/education/outreach/8thgradesol/AtomicNumMass.htm
Wednesday, June 15, 2011 at 2:44am by TutorCat

science
http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/cosmology/forces.html
Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 10:03am by Damon

science planets
Seasons are caused by the alignment, or non-alignment of the planets axis of spin with the perpendicular to the orbital plane. http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/time/seasons.html
Wednesday, March 24, 2010 at 9:55am by bobpursley

phys
thanks
Saturday, November 13, 2010 at 6:16pm by Jarod

phys
b.
Thursday, February 17, 2011 at 10:26am by drwls

phys!!! how do you do this
f=m(g+a)
Monday, October 22, 2012 at 10:41am by anthony

Science
Velocity is a vector quantity; i.e., it has both a speed AND a direction. Here is a site that talks about that. http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/CLASS/1DKin/U1L1d.html
Friday, April 10, 2009 at 8:42pm by DrBob222

physics
Good question. I don't really understand it myself. Perhaps this lecture will help: http://www.phys.ufl.edu/courses/phy4550-6555c/spring09/symposium-adiabatic-demag.pdf When searching the web, use a z instead of an s in "demagnetization".
Wednesday, March 21, 2012 at 7:00am by drwls

science
Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. Please try the following: http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/phys/Class/energy/u5l1b.html Sra
Thursday, November 6, 2008 at 8:15pm by SraJMcGin

Science
Here are some diagrams that explain it better than words. http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/CLASS/sound/u11l1c.html
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 at 11:40pm by DrBob222

science
Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. Here are some sites for you: 1. http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/sun/wind.html 2. (part II) http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/earth/magnetic.html 3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_wind 4. (NASA site): http://...
Wednesday, January 16, 2008 at 8:09pm by SraJMcGin

Phys sci
ITS C
Tuesday, December 8, 2009 at 10:06pm by PHYSICS

phys
-.8m/s
Monday, October 18, 2010 at 9:43pm by Carrie

phys
327
Thursday, April 26, 2012 at 12:29am by Cody

phys!!! how do you do this
is a negative
Monday, October 22, 2012 at 10:41am by anthony

PHYS
190
Sunday, November 1, 2009 at 8:09pm by isela

phys
cfghdf
Monday, June 19, 2006 at 7:47pm by Anonymous

phys
180
Friday, March 14, 2014 at 12:39pm by first

Physics
Josh, if you dont know how to add two ninety degree vectors, and you are now in statics, something is greatly wrong. http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/Class/vectors/u3l1b.html
Thursday, August 6, 2009 at 7:28pm by bobpursley

science
Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. In addition to the answer to your question, here is a site on waves: http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/phys/Class/waves/wavestoc.html
Sunday, January 27, 2008 at 10:06pm by SraJMcGin

earth science
http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/earth/atmosphere.html
Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 5:18pm by bobpursley

Physic please help!
The first four are ray diagrams. http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/Class/refln/u13l4b.html answer e can be done on the ray diagram also, but there is a formula you can use to check it.
Tuesday, November 6, 2007 at 7:14pm by bobpursley

physics.
What does concurent mean? In the same direction? What does opposite mean? If at right angles, you have to use the pyth theorem. http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/Class/vectors/u3l1b.html
Thursday, January 17, 2008 at 11:33pm by bobpursley

quantum mechanics
The box size enters in when writing the potential V(x). It becomes infinite at the ends. There is an interaction potential, but a more important consequence of having two electrons is the Pauli exclusion principle. See the discussion at http://galileo.phys.virginia.edu/classes...
Monday, April 5, 2010 at 5:52am by drwls

physics
1) See "charging a single sphere by innduction" here: http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/phys/class/estatics/u8l2b.html 2) No. Some of the electrons are free to move from atom to atom as a result of friction, but the nuclei are not. 3) yes
Tuesday, November 6, 2007 at 11:00pm by drwls

Physics
I thought a vector quantity had to have a magnitude AND a direction. Displacement has no direction does it? See this site. http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/Phys/Class/1DKin/U1L1b.html
Wednesday, July 16, 2008 at 10:36pm by DrBob222

Phys sci
what does that mean?
Tuesday, December 8, 2009 at 10:06pm by Joanna

phys
Thanh you drwls
Tuesday, December 15, 2009 at 2:28am by Bun

phys
Is D~11.7*10^-2
Wednesday, January 6, 2010 at 5:48pm by bun

phys.
P = IV and V = IR
Monday, January 11, 2010 at 7:41pm by Marth

Phys Ed
is tasty
Tuesday, November 3, 2009 at 1:39am by yolanda

Phys Ed
is tasty
Tuesday, November 3, 2009 at 1:39am by yolanda

phys-frequency
ccv
Sunday, December 6, 2009 at 6:00pm by Anonymous

phys sci..
i need help
Friday, October 2, 2009 at 1:03pm by chris

phys
you a stank emily
Thursday, September 6, 2012 at 9:18pm by fag

phys
c. a spinal reflex
Tuesday, August 13, 2013 at 12:20am by Elena

physics
Use Coulomb's law. F = k Q^2/R^2 In this case, Q is the electron charge and R is the separation distance. Set F = 8.50 N and solve for the separation R. Your course material should tell you the value of k, if you do not know it. You can also find it many places online, such as...
Monday, March 9, 2009 at 1:41am by drwls

Phys
Is the answer 30 radians?
Thursday, November 20, 2008 at 11:20pm by Phys

Phys Ed
ur mom
Tuesday, November 3, 2009 at 1:39am by yolanda

Phys Science
see my post.
Tuesday, July 19, 2011 at 4:53pm by bobpursley

PHYS ED
The second one
Thursday, March 13, 2008 at 10:20am by JOEY

Physics
How do you calculate. How many years would it take the planet to orbit the sun. All I have is, that the planet is 97 times farther from sun than earth or 97 Astronomical units Use Kepler's Third Law. If you have never heard of it, read http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/...
Friday, December 29, 2006 at 1:47pm by Harry

physical science
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/phys/Class/light/u12l2d.html
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 at 8:08pm by PsyDAG

science
I bet you did not go to the library. http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/899/2007/acp-7-899-2007.html
Friday, August 14, 2009 at 8:11am by bobpursley

physics
Look up the coefficient of kinetic friction for tires skidding on concrete. Call it Uk M V^2/2 = M g Uk X M's cancel; solve for V. g = 32.2 ft/s^2 V = sqrt(2*g*Uk*X) The number of tires does not matter. The answer will be in ft/s For Uk, http://ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/...
Thursday, May 26, 2011 at 11:46pm by drwls

Phys Ed
What are 2 professional lacrosse leagues?
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 at 10:36pm by Anonymous

phys sci..
Tension=m(a+g) where a is in the upwarddirection. solve for a.
Friday, October 2, 2009 at 1:03pm by bobpursley

phys
work= 300kw*10*4*25sec
Monday, October 26, 2009 at 7:47pm by bobpursley

phys
nvm, figured it out myself
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 1:08am by ami

phys ed
Have you considered asking your teacher?
Wednesday, April 28, 2010 at 3:11pm by bobpursley

phys
49 degrees west of north
Sunday, October 19, 2008 at 8:29pm by Anonymous

phys!!! how do you do this
F = ma You have m and a. Can F be far behind?
Monday, October 22, 2012 at 10:41am by Steve

PHYSICS
http://phys.thu.edu.tw/~ycchen/physics/ebook-8.01x/chapter24_physical_pendulum_v03.pdf
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 2:08pm by Elena

physics
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/CLASS/newtlaws/u2l4a.html
Friday, June 27, 2008 at 12:14am by DrBob222

Physics
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/Class/vectors/u3l1b.html
Monday, June 9, 2008 at 5:52pm by drwls

science
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/Phys/Class/waves/u10l1c.html
Wednesday, October 1, 2008 at 8:03pm by DrBob222

Phys
Yes. It equals (1/2)(time)(final angular speed)
Thursday, November 20, 2008 at 11:20pm by drwls

phys science
Answered above by Bob Pursley.
Tuesday, April 13, 2010 at 2:03pm by DrBob222

phys
You are wrong. Higher pitch they are moving closer.
Saturday, November 13, 2010 at 6:16pm by bobpursley

Phys Sci
:) My mom and I figured it out...so no help needed.
Tuesday, May 31, 2011 at 8:37pm by LinWa

PED212
I still hate phys ed. What about you?
Thursday, July 19, 2012 at 5:13pm by Ms. Sue

phys!!! how do you do this
I still aint getting the right answer
Monday, October 22, 2012 at 10:41am by anthony

phys!!! how do you do this
if the answer is not 95.76, there's something wrong.
Monday, October 22, 2012 at 10:41am by Steve

phys ics
b. V = (0.243/0.335) * 28m/s = 20.3 m/s.
Tuesday, July 16, 2013 at 3:01pm by Henry

Physics
His experiment, which was actually carried out by his graduate student, measured the charge "e" of the electron. No one had a clue what it was until then. Protons have the same charge, but opposite sign. It is easier to do the experiment with electrons. If you Google Millikan ...
Tuesday, December 14, 2010 at 10:51pm by drwls

PhYs...alpha particles
okay ..i get it...so the same equations apply to your method?
Sunday, February 17, 2008 at 8:04pm by Anonymous

PhYs...alpha particles
oooo ok....tHANXX!! appreciate the time and help.
Sunday, February 17, 2008 at 8:04pm by Anonymous

PHYS
q=mcdeltatemp m= 1.09E10/c*5 You are given C, solve for mass in kg
Sunday, November 1, 2009 at 8:09pm by bobpursley

phys-frequency
1.414, to be more exact. (The square root of 2)
Sunday, December 6, 2009 at 6:00pm by drwls

phys
i solved D~11.7*10^-2, but the answer key is .0956
Wednesday, January 6, 2010 at 5:48pm by bun

phys
"The drawing", or a detailed description of it, is needed to answer this question.
Wednesday, November 24, 2010 at 11:27am by drwls

Phys
An electric field is a fact.. a physical property that can be measured.
Saturday, February 5, 2011 at 5:46pm by drwls

Phys-Help!
Check you hand rules in your text. I can't decipher the figure.
Monday, April 25, 2011 at 4:21pm by bobpursley

phys
thank you...what I originally did was use the wrong specific heat for iron.
Thursday, April 26, 2012 at 1:12am by opp

physics
This looks like a laminar pipe flow problem. I do not recognize your � symbol, nor the units Ns/m2. Is that the viscosity? The friction factor is 64/(Reynolds number). You can either use pipe flow formulas with that friction factor, or special formulas for Poiseuille flow, ...
Wednesday, December 2, 2009 at 8:46pm by drwls

physics
You can use the lens equation to find (given fo, objectdistance) image distance. Then, use the magnification equation to find image height (di/do=hi/di) http://glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/Class/refrn/u14l5f.html
Monday, March 24, 2008 at 9:11pm by bobpursley

phys
Heat= mass*specificheat*changetemp solve for change in temp.
Monday, November 2, 2009 at 7:17pm by bobpursley

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