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April 18, 2014

Search: phi

Number of results: 582

Math
Work on the left hand side: (1 + sinØ + cosØ)/(1 - sinØ + cosØ) multiply both the numerator and denominator by (1-sinφ+cosφ) and simplify: ((1+cosφ)^2-sin&hi;^2)/(1-sinφ+cosφ)^2 =2cosφ(1+cosφ)/[2(1-sinφ)(1+cosφ)] =2cosφ/[2(1-sinφ)] =...
Tuesday, May 31, 2011 at 1:14pm by MathMate

Physics
The electric flux through each of the six sides of a rectangular box are as follows: phi 1= +150.0 N*m^2/C; phi 2= +250.0 N*m^2/C; phi 3= -350.0 N*m^2/C; phi 4= +175.0 N*m^2/C; phi 5= -100.0 N*m^2/C; phi 6= +450.0 N*m^2/C How much charge is in this box?
Tuesday, January 24, 2012 at 12:09am by Cooper

Physics
Ac = v^2/r r = L cos phi Horizontal: FT cos phi = m Ac = m v^2/(L cos phi ) Vertical FT sin phi = m g solve this first for FT = m g /sin phi then (m g /sin phi)cos phi = m v^2/(L cos phi) note: m does not matter in the end. now get v from circumference 2 pi r = v /1.8 v = 1.8*...
Sunday, October 31, 2010 at 9:45pm by Damon

Algebra
2013 = 3*11*61 phi(2013) = 2*10*60 = 2^4*3*5^2 13^[phi(2013)/2] = 1 13^[phi(2013)/3] = 562 13^[phi(2013)/5] = 1 This means that 13^[phi(2013)/10] = 1 Dividing the exponent by 5 gives: 13^[phi(2013)/50] = 1831 So, we only need to try dividing the exponent of phi(2013)/10 by ...
Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 4:46pm by Count Iblis

maths
The idea is to convert f(x)=asin(x)+bcos(x) into the form g(x)=k*cos(a+φ) where k and φ are constants dependent on a and b. This way, it is easy to show that the max/min values of the f(x) is ±k. Start with expanding g(x) using compound angles. g(x) =k(cos(&phi...
Friday, July 12, 2013 at 5:09am by MathMate

Math
If GCD(a,r) = 1 then a^phi(r) = 1 mod r, therefore: m^phi(n)+n^phi(m) mod n = 1 and m^phi(n)+n^phi(m) mod m = 1 So, mod(nm) it is 1.
Thursday, August 2, 2012 at 5:35pm by Count Iblis

Trig
Reduce to sin and cosines: 1/sinθ=(sinθ+cosθ)/sinθ Thus, if θ ≠ 0,π 2π ... we get sinθ+cosθ=1 Taking advantage of symmetry about π/4, where sinπ/4=cosπ/4, substitute θ=φ-π/4: sin(φ-π/4)+cos(φ-&...
Tuesday, May 4, 2010 at 9:35am by MathMate

Calculus
Evaluate, in spherical coordinates, the triple integral of f(rho,theta,phi)=cos (phi) , over the region 3<rho<7, 0<theta<2pi, 0<phi<pi/3. I used the equation cos (phi)*sin(phi)*rho d(rho)d(phi)d(theta) with the given boundaries. I got -632*pi*sqrt(3)/12 But ...
Wednesday, November 28, 2012 at 2:28pm by Mackenzie

math - just got better!
The following shows that value of sin(α+β) in where α & β are solutions to 6cosθ+8 sinθ=9 ...(1) does not depend on the right hand side, with the obvious stipulation that RHS ≤ √(6^2+8^2) Take the general case where Acosθ+Bsin&...
Thursday, August 11, 2011 at 5:45am by MathMate

Calculus
The equation I used is cos (phi)*sin(phi)*rho^2 d(rho)d(phi)d(theta) I misspelled it on the first message.
Wednesday, November 28, 2012 at 2:28pm by Mackenzie

Algebra
Let \phi(n) be the Euler Phi Function. If 1 \leq n \leq 1000, what is the smallest integer value of n that minimizes \frac{\phi(n)}{n}?
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 at 10:07pm by John

Physics
When the triangle of forces is an equilateral triangle, i.e. when φ=120°. So Acos(φ/2)+Bcos(φ/2)=A/2+B/2=A=B
Thursday, August 26, 2010 at 10:46pm by MathMate

math
I just looked at it again, it is not a coincidence! Since sin(α+φ)=0.9 and we got α=asin(0.9)-φ β=180-asin(0.9)-φ So by adding the two α+β = 180-2φ or sin(α+β) =sin(180-2φ) =sin(2φ) =sin(2 asin(0.6)) =0.96 !
Thursday, August 11, 2011 at 5:45am by MathMate

math/ physics
Let the angle with the horizontal be φ. and u the take-off speed (m/s) t = airborne duration (seconds) The vertical initial velocity, uy = u sin(φ) Horizontal velocity, ux = u cos(φ) When she lands, vertical distance=0: 0=uy t - (1/2)gt² t=2(uy)/g =2u sin(&phi...
Wednesday, September 22, 2010 at 8:33am by MathMate

chemistry
(1/2*m*v^2)= hc/wavelength)-phi Solve for phi, the work function. m = mass electrons. v = speed electron h = Planck's constant' c = speed of light in m/s wavelength in meters. phi will be energy in J/photon.
Friday, November 12, 2010 at 10:32pm by DrBob222

Math
The simplest way to find the angle is to use the formula: s=rφ where φ is in radians. Solve for φ and convert to degrees: φ = (s/r) *(180/π) = 65/2300 * (180/π) = 1.619° What is done above is to divide 65m by the circumference of the circle, and the ...
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 at 9:22pm by MathMate

Maths trigonometry
using basic trigonometry derive the following equations, which are used to convert cartesian to polar coordinates and vice versa. why is the cos(phi)in the x term? x = R cos (phi) sin (lamda) y = R sin (phi) they are used in orthogonal projection of a spherical surface to a ...
Sunday, October 16, 2011 at 11:32am by forest

trig
Since (5,12,13) is a Pythagorean triplet, tan(θ)=5/12. Mathematically, we solve it by: Divide by the right hand side: (5/13)sin(θ)+(12/13)cos(θ)=1 Since (5/13)²+(12/13)²=1, we can put 5/13=sin(φ) 12/13=cos(φ) so sin(φ)sin(θ)+cos(&...
Saturday, June 15, 2013 at 8:41am by MathMate

Math
I didn't see the drawing (so I don't know the direction of t0), but: Q2_1_3: tau max=|tau min|=(3*t_0*L)/(pi*R^3) r tau max = R (it's obvious) x tau max =3*L Q2_1_4: phi max=(9*t_0*L^2)/(8*pi*G_0*R^4) x phi max=3*L/2 dphi/dx is a derivative of phi and it's zero is at 3*L/2 (...
Friday, July 26, 2013 at 10:53am by Mors

Physics
The period of oscillation is P = 2 pi sqrt(m/k)= 0.898 s For your other questions, choose a value of the phase angle phi such that x = 10 cm * sin (2 pi t/P + phi) and the direction of motion (the sign of dx/dt) is correct. Fot the x=0 @ t=0 case, phi = pi
Wednesday, December 2, 2009 at 10:34pm by drwls

trig
Most of these questions can be answered by the definition of the general trigonometric functions: y = a sin A(x-φ) a is the amplitude 2π/A = period φ = phase shift. If you can transform the trigonometric functions into the above form and evaluate the values of a, A...
Thursday, December 17, 2009 at 12:00pm by MathMate

12th grade Trigonometry
Sum or difference of sin(θ) and cos(θ) can be solved in the following way, if you are familiar with the sum and difference formulae for sin(a±b). Given 3sin(θ)-4cos(θ)=2 for a particular φ and amplitude A, we rewrite the above equation as: ...
Friday, March 4, 2011 at 6:31am by MathMate

Math
s=rφ where φ is in radians. To change from radians to degrees, we multiply by 180°/π, since π radians equal 180°. For an angle a whole circle, it is 2π radians or 360°. So 2πr is the circumference, where φ=2π. (we know this formula from ...
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 at 9:22pm by MathMate

Math
Prove that if gcd(m,n)=1 then m^phi(n)+n^phi(m)=congruent 1 (mod mn)
Thursday, August 2, 2012 at 5:35pm by Anonymous

Math
What is the limit of cosx/log(x-phi/2+1) if lim x is to phi/2
Monday, August 6, 2012 at 1:07am by Anzi

PHI 103
We don't know the number of students in each class. Btw -- what does PHI stand for?
Saturday, December 4, 2010 at 1:27pm by Ms. Sue

Precalculs
I have no idea how to do these type of problems. -------Problem-------- Solve each equation on the interval 0 less than or equal to theta less than 2 pi 42. SQRT(3) sin theta + cos theta = 1 ---------------------- There is an example prior to the excersises that attempts to ...
Sunday, February 28, 2010 at 11:19pm by Kate

math
Please help me to find an equation for the tangent to the curve xsin2y=ycos2x at the point (phi/4, phi/2)
Monday, August 13, 2012 at 12:45pm by deel

Math
The phase shift is another way to do my a sin wt + b cos wt you can say instead c sin (wt - phi) now if you know that at t = 0, csin(wt-phi) = -1.5 then c = 1.5 and sin (-phi) = -1 then phi must be -pi/2 or a phase shift of 90 degrees but 90 degrees from the sine is the cosine...
Wednesday, August 10, 2011 at 5:45pm by Damon

math
Yeah, you have a good point. I didn't show (nor check) that both α and β satisfy the original equation, and the answer is therefore... incorrect. All I had done was to show that φ=asin(6/10)=36.87° and sin(α+φ)=0.9, I should have continue this way...
Thursday, August 11, 2011 at 5:45am by MathMate

trig
If y= A sin(wt+phi) w is the angular frequency (2PI*freq), A is amplitude, and phi is phase shift
Wednesday, April 9, 2008 at 7:12pm by bobpursley

precalculus PLEASE HELP!!
Rewrite 4 sin(x) -1 cos(x) as A sin(x + phi) A= phi= -pi less than phi less than pi
Friday, April 12, 2013 at 10:01pm by anonymous

Math
If you want, you can start from F0=0 F1=1 and from F2 and up, use Fn=Fn-2+Fn-1 to continue: F2=0+1=1 F3=1+1=2 F4=2+1=3 F5=3+2=5 .... Until F26=? (it's over 120000) However, some smart mathematician found this following formula: &phi=(1+sqrt(5))/2 Fn=(φ^n-(1-φ)^n)/sqrt(...
Saturday, March 26, 2011 at 5:24pm by MathMate

Chemistry
In the quantum mechanical solution of the Schroedinger equation for electronic wave function of an atom, it is (correctly) assumed that the probability distribution function for the electron, Psi(r, theta, phi) is the product of three distribution functions: R(r), f(theta)and ...
Sunday, November 30, 2008 at 11:49am by drwls

physics
Get the amplitude A from (1/2)kx^2 + (1/2)m v^2 = (1/2) k A^2 where x and v are the displacement and velocity at any time, t. 50*(0.129)^2 + 1*(3.415)^2 = 50*A^2 50 A^2 = 12.49 A = 0.500 m That does not agreee with your result. sqrt 50 is the angular frequency in Hz, NOT the ...
Sunday, March 30, 2008 at 9:37pm by drwls

Physics
E1(max) = 0.5 eV = hc/L1 - phi E2(max) = 3.8 eV = 2hc/L1 - phi where L1 = first wavelength L1/2 = second wavelength phi = work function 3.3 eV = hc/L1 b) Solve for L1 first a) Then solve for phi
Monday, December 12, 2011 at 11:02pm by drwls

Quantum Physics
@4:46 because the X bit flip acts in those eigenvectors. I think the answer is as follows: theta = pi/2 phi = B*t Now i am not 100% on phi; it may be 2*B*t
Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 10:36pm by Anonymous 234

Math
Q2_1_1 TXC=-3/2*t_0*L Q2_1_2: d*phi/dx = (t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) d*phi/dx =t_0*(3*L-2*x))/(2*pi*G_0*R^4) x0 = 3/2*L Q2_1_3: tau max=(4*t_0*L)/(pi*R^3) r tau max = R x tau max =3*L •MITx: 2.01x - ElementarySchoolStudent, Saturday, July 27, 2013 at 2:12am Q2_1_1 TXC=-3/2*t_0*L ...
Friday, July 26, 2013 at 10:53am by ElementarySchoolStudent

pre-calc
You need to tell me where D was at the start to get phi in y = 125 + 125 sin (.2 pi t - phi)
Tuesday, March 17, 2009 at 5:29pm by Damon

Allied Health
Under HIPAA, which one of the following statements is true regarding the release of PHI by covered entities to business associates? A. Covered entities are responsible for the use of PHI made by business associates. B. Covered entities aren’t allowed to release PHI (...
Monday, April 20, 2009 at 5:03pm by Andrew

health
Under HIPAA, which one of the following statements is true regarding the release of PHI by covered entities to business associates? A. Covered entities are responsible for the use of PHI made by business associates. B. Covered entities aren’t allowed to release PHI (...
Sunday, January 23, 2011 at 6:25am by Anonymous

physics
Now we measure 110 volts across the whole circuit and that must be the sum of the three voltages. Therefore 110 sin(wt+phi) = 80 cos wt - 40 sin wt + [1/(60 pi C)] sin wt 110 sin(wt+phi)= 80 cos wt + [-40+ 1/(60piC)]sin wt 110[sinwt cosphi + coswt sinphi] =80 cos wt + [-40+ 1...
Wednesday, March 24, 2010 at 3:18pm by Damon

MIT 2.01x
Q2_1_1 TXC=-3/2*t_0*L Q2_1_2: d*phi/dx = (t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) d*phi/dx =t_0*(3*L-2*x))/(2*pi*G_0*R^4) x0 = 3/2*L Q2_1_3: tau max=(4*t_0*L)/(pi*R^3) r tau max = R x tau max =3*L •MITx: 2.01x - ElementarySchoolStudent, Saturday, July 27, 2013 at 2:12am Q2_1_1 TXC=-3/2*t_0*L ...
Friday, July 26, 2013 at 10:30am by ElementarySchoolStudent

Math ( I Dont understand)
Your question is incomplete. For a wave equation in the form Y(t) = A cos[2*pi*t/P -(phi)] + B P is the period A is the amplitude phi is the phase shift, and B is the vertical shift
Saturday, July 21, 2012 at 9:12am by drwls

MITx: 2.01x
Q2_1_1 TXC=-3/2*t_0*L Q2_1_2: d*phi/dx = (t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) d*phi/dx =t_0*(3*L-2*x))/(2*pi*G_0*R^4) x0 = 3/2*L Q2_1_3: tau max=(4*t_0*L)/(pi*R^3) r tau max = R x tau max =3*L Q2_1_4 1) phi=(9*t_0*L^2)/(2*pi*G_0*R^4) 2) x phi max=3*L/2
Friday, July 26, 2013 at 10:44am by ElementarySchoolStudent

math
I will assume that the 2 after the sin is not an exponent, and that 2(x + pi/2) is the argument of the sine function. Compare this standard form of the one-dimensional wave equation A sin (2*pi*x/P -phi) where A = amplitude P = period phi = phase shift. Ignore the displacement...
Friday, January 21, 2011 at 12:36pm by drwls

Quantum Physics
So, here is my rationale. |+> and |-> are two eigenvectors of X, with eigenvalues of 1 and -1. So, putting them through X makes them unchanged, bar reversal of |->. |0> = 1/sqrt(2)|+> + 1/sqrt(2)|-> That is the output: X*|0> = |1> = 1/sqrt(2)|+> - 1/...
Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 10:36pm by Anonymous

Allied health
Under HIPAA, which one of the following statements is true regarding the release of PHI by covered entities to business associates? A. Covered entities are responsible for the use of PHI made by business associates. B. Covered entities aren't allowed to release PHI (...
Saturday, January 8, 2011 at 1:56pm by Betts

Physics: Simple Harmonic Motion
I am going to assume you are in calculus. x(t)=2E-4 * sin(wt+Phi) v(t)=w*2E-4 * cos(wt+Phi) a(t)=w^2*2E-4 sin(wt+Phi) You know the w=2PI/period, so given max a, find w, and then period. then max speed. total ME? 1/2 m (maxv)^2 for the last q, remember F=ma You know max ...
Wednesday, December 1, 2010 at 8:01pm by bobpursley

Quantum Physics
Suppose you are given an endless supply of qubit pairs in the state 1/sqrt(2)|00> + e^iphi/sqrt(2)|10>. To estimate the phase angle phi, you run Fourier sampling (i.e. Hadamard on each qubit followed by a standard basis measurement) on this state repeatedly. After 100,...
Tuesday, October 15, 2013 at 9:56am by imath

Quantum Physics
I tried: theta = pi phi=-B*t theta = pi phi=-2*B*t Both incorrect. Down to the last answer.
Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 10:36pm by Anonymous

Quantum Physics
I tried: theta = pi phi=-B*t theta = pi phi=-2*B*t Both incorrect. Down to the last answer.
Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 10:36pm by Anonymous

Quantum Physics
I tried: theta = pi phi=-B*t theta = pi phi=-2*B*t Both incorrect. Down to the last answer.
Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 10:36pm by Anonymous

Physics SHM
Sorry Bob, The wave represents a simple pendulum. In 3, I'm referring to the equation x(t)=Asin(wt+(greek letter phi)), so was looking to confirm that in that specific circumstance I outlined, the value of phi would either be zero or pi (as in 22/7). Thanks.
Wednesday, November 5, 2008 at 1:51pm by charlie

college physics
First check if it is feasible! The fortress is 40 m high and 100 m away. The angle θ=tan-1(40,100)=21.8°. Since θ < angle of elevation of cannon of 37°, it is feasible. Let the muzzle velocity be v0, and the angle of elevation be φ. Horizontal ...
Sunday, November 29, 2009 at 3:31pm by MathMate

Vectors (Physics/Math)
(a) θ=25° φ=70° Cx = Ax + Bx = |A|cos(θ) + |B|cos(φ) =18cos(25)+24cos(70) = 16.31 + 8.21 = 24.52 Cy = Ay + By = |A|sin(θ) + |B|sin(φ) = 18sin(25)+24sin(70) = 7.61 + 22.55 = 30.16 (b) similar to (a), but subtract instead of add.
Thursday, August 25, 2011 at 10:51pm by MathMate

Quantum Physics
i tried theta = pi and phi = -b*t and theta = pi and phi = -2*b*t try it with 2bt
Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 10:36pm by jerome

Alg 1
A golden rectangle is one whose side lengths are in the golden ratio, 1:phi, where phi is approximately 1.618. Look up "golden rectangle" on Google.
Tuesday, April 2, 2013 at 5:17pm by PsyDAG

Physics
I'm having a difficult time understanding the formulas for maximum constructive interference and perfect destructive interference. I know that MCI there's the biggest amplitude? and for PDI it's 0. The forumlas are delta phi = 2pi(deltax/lambda)+delta phi FOR BOTH OF THEM?? I ...
Friday, February 20, 2009 at 12:51pm by Sam

MIT 2.01x
Answers Q2_1_2 a) T(x) in 0<=x<=L T(X)=t_0*L d*phi/dx=T(x)/(GI) where I=(pi*R^4)/2 so d*phi/dx=(2*t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) b) T(x) in l<=x<=3L T(x)=t_0*(2*L-x) so d*Phi/dx=(2*t_0+(2*L-x))/(pi*G_0*R^4) c)(d*phi/dx)(x)=0 when 0=(2*t_0+(2*L-x))/(pi*G_0*R^4) so (2*L-x)=0 &...
Friday, July 26, 2013 at 12:18pm by superman

math
Note in this question and your last one that the range of the sine function is from -1 to +1 (same with cos or with sin (w t + phi) where phi is a constant phase angle) therefore range of a sin w t or a cos w t is -a to + a
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 at 6:05pm by Damon

Physics
e*(Phi) = h*c/(lambda) - (max K.E.) = photon energy - (max electron energy) Solve for the work function phi, in electron volts h is Planck's constant
Tuesday, May 18, 2010 at 11:12pm by drwls

MIT LAB
Q2_1_2 a) T(x) in 0<=x<=L T(X)=t_0*L d*phi/dx=T(x)/(GI) where I=(pi*R^4)/2 so d*phi/dx=(2*t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) b) T(x) in l<=x<=3L T(x)=t_0*(2*L-x) so d*Phi/dx=(2*t_0+(2*L-x))/(pi*G_0*R^4) c)(d*phi/dx)(x)=0 when 0=(2*t_0+(2*L-x))/(pi*G_0*R^4) so (2*L-x)=0 >>&...
Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 12:39pm by superman

physics
exactly. This is all I was given. Possibly SumOf t = T(exp)*length* sin(theta) - W(hang) * length * sin(phi) - W(boom) * L(exp) * sin(phi) = 0 but im not sure.
Wednesday, November 28, 2012 at 2:57pm by Anna

Physics
Use the information on wire length and radius to get the number of turns, N. 5.8 meters = 2*pi*R*N N = 7.7 Let's call it 7 turns. The other 0.7 m might be used for connections. Maximum Flux = Phi = N*B*A = 7*0.21*pi*R^2 = 0.067 Webers Peak EMF = w*Phi= 1.7 volts where w is the...
Sunday, March 17, 2013 at 1:32am by drwls

Calculus
What you have to do here is show that the volume element: dxdydz can be written as r^2 sin(theta)dphi dtheta dr where theta is the angle w.r.t. the z-axis and phi is the angle that corresponds to rotating around the z-axis. It is easy to see that this is the volume element ...
Wednesday, November 25, 2009 at 9:24am by Count Iblis

Astrophysics
(a) From the absorption lines, we were able to determine that the star (phi)-Fictus has spectral classification F7V and color index B-V=0/48. What is the mass M(phi) of the star in solar masses? (b) Spectroscopic parallax, when corrected for reddening, yields a distance of 4.5...
Tuesday, February 2, 2010 at 11:49am by O_o Rion

physics
A=10cm w=2PIf=2PI/T= PI/3 f(t)=Acos(wt+Phi) f(0)=10cm*cos(0+phi)=5 >>>phi=PI/3 radians f(t)=10cm*cos(wt+PI/3) f'=-10cm*w*sin(wt+PI/3)=velocity f"=-10cm*w^2*cos(PI*t/3+PI/3)=acceleration
Thursday, November 18, 2010 at 10:39am by bobpursley

chemistry
suppose you know the values for r, theta, and phi which specify a point. what are the corresponding values of x,y,z? Write an expression for x as a function or r, theta,and phi; then do the same for x,y,z. Using the answer to the previous question write the angular parts of ...
Thursday, March 31, 2011 at 8:06pm by Olga

Physics
Q2_1_2 a) T(x) in 0<=x<=L T(X)=t_0*L d*phi/dx=T(x)/(GI) where I=(pi*R^4)/2 so d*phi/dx=(2*t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) b) T(x) in l<=x<=3L T(x)=t_0*(2*L-x) so d*Phi/dx=(2*t_0+(2*L-x))/(pi*G_0*R^4) c)(d*phi/dx)(x)=0 when 0=(2*t_0+(2*L-x))/(pi*G_0*R^4) so (2*L-x)=0 >>&...
Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 12:39pm by superman

MIT 2.01x
Q2_1_2: d*phi/dx = (t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) d*phi/dx = (t_0*(3*L-2*x))/(2*pi*G_0*R^4) x0 = 3/2*L some one for the rest?
Friday, July 26, 2013 at 10:30am by access014

Maths: Partial Differentiation
1) If x = rcos theta and y = r sin theta, show that partial r / partial x = cos theta and find partial theta / partial x. 2) If z = sin theta.sin phi.sin gamma, and z is calculated for the values theta = 30degrees, phi = 45 degrees and gamma = 60degrees, find approximately the...
Saturday, January 9, 2010 at 8:05am by Claire

Quantum Physics
there is no point in faking when you can always create a new account and get an extra 3 tries(I hope you guys aren't trying these on your actual accounts). Why not just stick to solving the problem. I'm trying to do it like I did 8C but it's just not working. The rotation ...
Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 10:36pm by Anonymous

Trigonometry - Slopes stuff
Point A is the terminal point of angle phi and point B is the terminal point of angle theta. Point A is in the first quadrant and point B is in the second quadrant, while tan phi = 1 and tan theta = -7. Find the slope of AB. Ok so since A is in the first quadrant and tan phi...
Friday, October 18, 2013 at 10:14pm by John

Quantum Physics
YEap, if you see this thread, you will see that they ask if someone has mixed phi with theta as he give an answer Theta=pi/2 a Phi=2bt. It's only matter of reading you cheaters. physics.stackexchange dot com/questions/81101/quantum-computation-hamiltonian
Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 10:36pm by Anonymous

Physics,2.01x
TXC=-3/2*t_0*L Q2_1_2: d*phi/dx = (t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) d*phi/dx = (t_0*(3*L-2*x))/(2*pi*G_0*R^4) x0 = 3/2*L some one for the rest? Q2_1_3: rômax = R xômax =3*L
Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 1:20am by access014

Quantum Physics
theta = 0 and phi = pi/2 is wrong theta = pi/2 and phi = 0 is also wrong
Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 10:36pm by Anonymous

calculus
We are not going to do that work for you, but will be glad to help you. The unit sphere is the sphere with radius 1 centered in the origin. They give you the coordinates of a vector. Compute the dot product of the vector and the local surface area normal and integrate it over ...
Sunday, August 5, 2007 at 2:15pm by drwls

Physics - Inelastic Collision ( check + help)
We do not know if it is an elastic collision, but momentum is always conserved. Your calculations seem to be based on the conservation of momentum in both directions, but you had a cos(θ) for both the "horizontal", or x-direction, and the "vertical", or y-direction. ...
Sunday, September 26, 2010 at 2:52pm by MathMate

physics
Number of turns in the coil : N = 5.5/(2 pi R) = 7.3 Coil area = A = pi R^2 B = 0.1 T R = 0.12 m Phi = magnetic flux = B A N cos theta Induced EMF =d(Phi)/dt = - B A N sin theta * w where w = d(theta) dt = 25 radians per second Peak EMF = B A N w
Friday, February 15, 2008 at 10:24pm by drwls

chemistry
NH4I(s) ==> NH3(s) + HI(g) Kp = PNH3*PHI = 0.215 mole fraction NH3 = 0.5 mole fraction HI = 0.5 (Since moles NH3 = moles HI at equilibrium, then each will be just 1/2 of the total which makes mole fraction of each 0.5.) PNH3 = XNH3*Ptotal = 0.5*Ptotal PHI = XHI*Ptotal= 0.5*...
Tuesday, March 22, 2011 at 1:53am by DrBob222

Fibonacci Numbers: Understand one part not another
You have correctly calculated the 20th fibonacci number as 6765. That's an excellent start. To calculate any Fibonacci number without having to go through the recursive process (n times) is to use the Binet's formula. To simiply things, two constants have been defined: φ=(...
Wednesday, October 12, 2011 at 7:14pm by MathMate

PHI 103
PHI 103 Symbolic Logic- write 2 argument in English,one in the form of modus ponens and one in the form of modus tollens.Then write the argument in symbols using sentences letters and truth-functional connectives.
Thursday, September 29, 2011 at 11:02pm by Vandella

Physics
When two vectors vector A and vector B are drawn from a common point, the angle between them is phi. If vector A and vector B have the same magnitude, for which value of phi will their vector sum have the same magnitude as vector A or vector B?
Thursday, August 26, 2010 at 10:46pm by Ami

MIT 2.01x
OK Let me see Answer Q2_1_1: Sum=0 -Tx_1+INTEGRAL{3L-L}t_0*dx+TXC=0 so Tx_1=2*L*t_0+TXC {0<=x<=L} -Tx_2+INTEFRAL{3L-x}t_0*dx+TXC=0 so Tx_2=t_0*(3L-x)+TXC {L<=x<=3L} d*phi/dx =Tx/GI so in x<=_x<=L d*phi/dx= (TXC+2*L*t_0)/G_0*I in L<=x<=3L d*phi/dx= (t_0...
Friday, July 26, 2013 at 10:30am by superman

Quantum Physics
Let |\psi\rangle=\frac{1-i}{2}|0\rangle-\frac{1+i}{2}|1\rangle and |\phi\rangle=\frac{2+i}{3}|0\rangle-\frac{2i}{3}|1\rangle. What is \langle \psi\,|\,\phi\rangle? Please tell the ans...
Monday, March 18, 2013 at 2:37pm by RAJNI

Physics
Interactive LearningWare 22.2 at wiley/college/cutnell reviews the fundamental approach in problems such as this. A constant magnetic field passes through a single rectangular loop whose dimensions are 0.35 m 0.55 m. The magnetic field has a magnitude of 2.1 T and is inclined ...
Friday, October 5, 2007 at 11:53pm by Mary

Quantum Physics
We will get the certificate regardless, very well past that point. And we are not cheaters but rather the hard working overachievers. The problem is the suspense - we where studying so hard, what we have not learned so that nobody could answer that seemingly easy question ? ...
Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 10:36pm by Anonymous

Trigonometry - Slopes stuff
for A, tan phi = 1 = 1/2 so point A is (1,1) since tanØ = -7 = -7/1 and Ø is in II then point B is (-7,1) so slope of AB = (1-1)/(-7-1) = 0 BUT, this is a poorly worded question What if point A is (5,5) notice that tan phi = 5/5 = 1 You were also correct in saying A is (√...
Friday, October 18, 2013 at 10:14pm by Reiny

Trigonometry
A typical trigonometric function such as f(x) = a sin k(x-φ) has the following definitions: amplitude = |a|, or the absolute value of a period = 2π/k phase shift = φ For example, y = 3 sin 2(x-π/4) has an amplitude of 3, period of 2π/2=π, and phase shift of...
Monday, December 14, 2009 at 2:16pm by MathMate

math
RATES OF CHANGE QUESTION A spherical balloon is being blown up so that its volume is increasing by 0.6 m^3 s^-1. Find the rate at which the radius is increasing when the radius is 0.1 m. So what I did was that I determined dV/dt =0.6 and dV/dr = 4/3 r^3 phi (which is the ...
Sunday, June 13, 2010 at 9:22am by tina

MIT 2.01x
fuubo check this Q2_1_1 TXC=-3/2*t_0*L Q2_1_2: d*phi/dx = (t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) d*phi/dx =t_0*(3*L-2*x))/(2*pi*G_0*R^4) x0 = 3/2*L Q2_1_3: tau max=(4*t_0*L)/(pi*R^3) r tau max = R x tau max =3*L
Friday, July 26, 2013 at 12:18pm by ElementarySchoolStudent

trig
This question has to do with the basic definitions of the terminologies of the harmonic functions. I will give you an example which you can compare with your school notes, or your textbook. In the case of y = a sin k(x-φ) + v |a| = amplitude k = period φ=phase shift (...
Monday, November 23, 2009 at 4:15pm by MathMate

math
first, it's PI, not PHI pi(π) = 3.14, the ratio of circumference to diameter phi(φ) = 1.62 (1+√5)/2, the golden ratio So, we use implicit differentiation to get xsin2y = ycos2x sin2y + 2xcos2y y' = cos2x y' - 2ysin2x y' = -(sin2y + 2y sin2x)/(2x cos2y - cos2x) ...
Monday, August 13, 2012 at 12:45pm by Steve

Allied health
Please try some of the following links for help: http://search.yahoo.com/search?fr=mcafee&p=HIPAA+and+rules+for+PHI+release Sra
Saturday, January 8, 2011 at 1:56pm by SraJMcGin

MITx: 2.01x
Q2_1_1 TXC=-3/2*t_0*L Q2_1_2: d*phi/dx = (t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) d*phi/dx =t_0*(3*L-2*x))/(2*pi*G_0*R^4) x0 = 3/2*L Q2_1_3: tau max=(4*t_0*L)/(pi*R^3) r tau max = R x tau max =3*L
Friday, July 26, 2013 at 10:44am by ElementarySchoolStudent

Physics
Q2_1_1 TXC=-3/2*t_0*L Q2_1_2: d*phi/dx = (t_0*L)/(pi*G_0*R^4) d*phi/dx =t_0*(3*L-2*x))/(2*pi*G_0*R^4) x0 = 3/2*L Q2_1_3: tau max=(4*t_0*L)/(pi*R^3) r tau max = R x tau max =3*L
Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 12:39pm by ElementarySchoolStudent

PHI 103
No
Saturday, December 10, 2011 at 1:53pm by Elias

phi 103
Thank you!
Monday, April 30, 2012 at 4:22pm by dan

PHI 103
1. p^~q 2. Why not?
Saturday, January 5, 2013 at 11:25pm by Steve

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