Sunday
April 20, 2014

Search: math -binomial probability

Number of results: 221,238

MATH
Answer the following: (A) Find the binomial probability P(x = 4), where n = 12 and p = 0.30. (B) Set up, without solving, the binomial probability P(x is at most 4) using probability notation. (C) How would you find the normal approximation to the binomial probability P(x = 4...
Friday, November 11, 2011 at 1:19pm by Jennifer

math-binomial prob
Use the binomial theorem to get the possibility of 0,1,2,3,4 and 5 correct. For zero correct, the probability is just (3/4)^5 = 0.2373. 3/4 is the probability of getting each one wrong. For five correct, the probability is (1/4)^5 = 0.0001 For one correct, (one success and 4 ...
Friday, December 14, 2007 at 12:44pm by drwls

college ststistics
A. find the binomial probability p(x=5) where n=14 and p=0.30. B. setup without solving the binomial probability p(x is at most 5) using probability notation C. how would you find normal approximation to the binomial probability p(x=5) in part A. please show how you would ...
Sunday, June 3, 2012 at 4:55pm by melba

binomial probabbility
Assume that a procedure yields a binomial distribution with a trial repeated n times. use the binomial probability formula to find the probability of x success given the probability p of success on a single trial. 1. by formula- n=9, x=2, p=0.35 2. by PDF- n=15, x=13, p=1/3
Friday, September 23, 2011 at 2:35pm by bibi

statistics
Answer the following: (A) Find the binomial probability P(x = 5), where n = 12 and p = 0.70. (B) Set up, without solving, the binomial probability P(x is at most 5) using probability notation. (C) How would you find the normal approximation to the binomial probability P(x = 5...
Thursday, December 6, 2012 at 1:16am by Huffette

statistics
Assume a binomial probability distribution has p = .60 and n = 200. a)What are the mean and standard deviation (to 2 decimals)? b)Why can the normal probability distribution be used to approximate this binomial distribution? c)What is the probability of 100 to 110 successes (...
Saturday, April 5, 2014 at 11:42pm by Vanessa

Math/Prob
We will have to assume the ESP estimation is correct. The resulting distribution is binomial, with 5 questions, and probability of success p=1-0.6=0.4, q=1-p=0.6 (failure). The probability of getting exactly n question correct (out of 5) is given by the binomial coefficient C(...
Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 3:08pm by MathMate

Statistics
Suppose we want to determine the (binomial) probability (p) of getting 4 heads in 15 flips of a 2-sided coin. Using the Binomial Probabilities Table in Appendix B of the text, what values of n, x and p would we use to look up this probability, and what would be the probability?
Thursday, October 13, 2011 at 8:43am by destiny

statistics
Try a binomial probability table or use a binomial probability function, which is this: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] For (A) x = 3 n = 15 p = .20 q = .80 (q is 1-p) For (B) Using a table might be easier for this one. Find P(0), P(1), P(2), P(3), P(4), and P(5). Add together, ...
Sunday, October 7, 2012 at 9:46am by MathGuru

NSU, Finite Math
Problem Solving:Using the Binomial Formula: P(x)=(nCx)pxqn-x A Dozen Eggs An egg distributor determines that the probability that any individual egg has a crack is .014. a)Write the binomial probability formula to determine the probability that exactly x of n eggs are cracked...
Friday, April 6, 2007 at 6:42pm by Trudy

statistics
Try a binomial probability table or use a binomial probability function, which is this: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] x = 47 n = 50 p = .95 q = .05 (q is 1-p) I'll let you take it from here.
Monday, September 12, 2011 at 2:01pm by MathGuru

probability/binomial
i'm having trouble with probability and the binomial thm, could i get a good website with problems
Saturday, March 24, 2012 at 1:17pm by joe

Statistics
Use the binomial probability function. If you use a binomial probability table, this problem will be easily solved. In most tables, you will need x, n, and p. x = 8, n = 10, and p = .5 (look up the probability in the table using those values). I hope this will help.
Sunday, March 13, 2011 at 5:33pm by MathGuru

Statistics
Use the binomial probability function: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] n = 10 x = 0,1 p = 0.10 q = 1 - p = 0.90 Find P(0), P(1). Add together for your probability. Note: You can also use a binomial probability function table with the values listed to find the probability as well. ...
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 at 3:00pm by MathGuru

MATH
if binomial A has the same terms as binomial B, then A+B is a binomial. So, for example x+2 + 2x-5 = 3x-3, which is a binomial However, x+2 - y-7 = x-y+9, which is not a binomial.
Tuesday, September 27, 2011 at 7:29pm by Steve

statistics
Consider a binomial experiment with 20 trials and probability 0.45 on a single trial. Use the binomial distribution to find the probability of exactly 10 successes. Round your answer to the thousandths place
Thursday, July 28, 2011 at 3:43pm by Rosalyn

Probability and Stats
Out of six students, we need exactly 3 fit the criteria of being born in 3 months out of 12, i.e. with probability p=3/12=0.25. Since the probability is assumed constant throughout, and we know the total number of students, we can use the binomial distribution, where n=6 x=3 p...
Wednesday, August 8, 2012 at 10:29am by MathMate

statistics
Use the binomial probability function: P(x) = nCx(p^x)[q^(n-x)] n = 20 x = 10 p = 0.45 q = 1 - p = 0.55 Substitute into the function and go from there. Note: You can also use a binomial probability function table with the values listed to find the probability as well. It is an...
Thursday, July 28, 2011 at 3:43pm by MathGuru

STATISTICS
(a) With n=12 and p =0.4 find the binomial probability that p(9) by using a binomial probability table. (b) np 5, nq5, also estimate the indicated probability by using the normal distribution as an approximation to the binomial, is np < 5 or nq < 5 than state the ...
Sunday, June 2, 2013 at 3:10pm by Jenn

Statistics
Find P(0), then take 1 - P(0) for your probability (since the problem says "what is the probability that at least one" is defective). Using the binomial probability function (you can use a binomial probability table as well): P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] n = 4 x = 0 p = 17/53...
Sunday, September 9, 2007 at 9:58pm by MathGuru

Statistics
(a) With n=12 and p =0.4 find the binomial probability that p(9) by using a binomial probability table. (b) np 5, nq5, also estimate the indicated probability by using the normal distribution as an approximation to the binomial, is np < 5 or nq < 5 than state the ...
Saturday, June 1, 2013 at 8:54pm by Jenn

stastistics
With n=13 and p=0.7, find the binomial probability P(9)by using a binomial probability table. If np> and nq>5, also estimate the indicated probability by using the normal distribution as an approximation to the binomial,if np<5 of nq<5 then state that the normal ...
Friday, November 22, 2013 at 9:48pm by angela

statistics
With n=13 and p= 0.7, find the binomial probability p(9) by using a binomial probability table. If np> and nq> 5, also estimate the indicated probability by using the normal distribution as an approximation to the binomial, if np<5 or nq<5 then state that the ...
Monday, November 25, 2013 at 9:36pm by angela

Statistics
Try the binomial probability function. If you have access to a binomial probability table, this will make the problem much easier to solve. In most tables, you need to find x, n, and p. You will need to find each x value, then add together for your total probability. x = 7, 8...
Monday, March 14, 2011 at 12:09am by MathGuru

Statistics
Use binomial probability because: probability is known and does not change over the experiment, outcome is binomial (success or failure), each step of the experiment is similar, p=0.25 n=10 P(r)=number of question correct =nCr(p^r)(1-p)^(n-r) nCr = binomial coefficient = n!/((...
Tuesday, May 7, 2013 at 5:34pm by MathMate

statistics
Assume that a procedure yields a binomial distribution with a trial repeated n times. Use a binomial probabilities table to find the probability of x successes given the probability p of success in a given trial. n= 3 , x=1, p= 0.60
Sunday, November 3, 2013 at 5:56pm by angela

statistics
You can use a binomial probability table or do this by hand. If you are doing this by hand, use the binomial probability function, which states: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] x = 3 n = 20 p = .24 q = 1 - p I'll let you take it from here.
Tuesday, September 13, 2011 at 2:26pm by MathGuru

statistic
This is a binomial distribution with parameters n=3 (number of trials in the experiment) p=1/2 (probability of boys, X) q=1-p (probability of girls) For a random variable X with a binomial distribution (n,p,q), then E(x)=μ=np σ²=npq where σ=standard ...
Tuesday, August 20, 2013 at 4:35pm by MathMate

biostatistics
Use the binomial probability function: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] n = 17 x = 11 through 17 p = 0.4 q = 1 - p = 0.6 Find P(11) through P(17). Add together for your probability. Note: You can also use a binomial probability function table with the values listed to find the ...
Wednesday, February 5, 2014 at 4:07pm by MathGuru

statistics
Try the binomial probability function: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] x = 70 n = 30 p = .34 q = 1 - p = 1 - .34 = .66 Substitute the values and go from there. An easier way would be to use a binomial probability table with the values stated above. I hope this will help.
Tuesday, July 12, 2011 at 12:28pm by MathGuru

statistics
Try the binomial probability function: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] x = 10 n = 20 p = 0.45 q = 1 - p = 1 - 0.45 = 0.55 Substitute the values and calculate. An easier way would be to use a binomial probability table with the values stated above. I hope this will help.
Tuesday, August 2, 2011 at 9:51am by MathGuru

Statistics
Try using the binomial probability formula or the binomial probability table. Using a binomial probability table is much easier. For a): n = 20; x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; p = .20 When you find the probabilities for each x, add all of them together for your total probability. ...
Wednesday, October 22, 2008 at 10:48am by MathGuru

math-binomial prob
I do not understand the binomial theorem. One of my questions is "there are 5 mutiple choice questions with 4 possible answers each. What is the probability of getting more than 3, exactly 3, and less than 3 correct?" Thanks for any help:)
Friday, December 14, 2007 at 12:44pm by Danielle

Statistics
Assume it is known that the probability of birth is equal in all months. What is the probability that in the STAT class of 120 students, exactly 20 students have their birthdays in either August or September? Solve using (i) the exact Binomial distribution, (ii) the Normal ...
Friday, February 28, 2014 at 9:56am by Lee

MATH
p=probability of voting q=(1-p)=probability of not voting. Out of 5 adults randomly selected, the probability that exactly 2 voted is calculated according to the binomial expansion, C(5,2)p^2q^3 =(5!/(2!3!))*0.57^2*0.43^3 =0.258 (approx.)
Sunday, May 13, 2012 at 6:58pm by MathMate

Another binomial distribution question
Here's one way to do this problem: n = 10 p = 400/10000 = .04 q = 1 - p = 1 - .04 = .96 You will need to find P(2) through P(10). Add those values for your probability. You can use a binomial probability table, or calculate by hand using the following formula: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x...
Saturday, August 25, 2007 at 11:32pm by MathGuru

Statistics
2. (TCO 5) A company produces electronic equipments claims that 98% of their products never need any kind of maintenance. We selected 10 of their products and we wanted to know the probability that 8 of them never need maintenance. Choose the best answer of the following: (...
Friday, March 1, 2013 at 9:57pm by JAR

Math
For a binomial distribution with n=20 trials and probability of success p=.05, we let r= number of successes out of 20 trials. Use the normal approximation to estimate P(6<=r<=12). How does this value compare with the corresponding probability obtained using the binomial...
Monday, January 21, 2013 at 8:59pm by Leanne

Check answers please Statistics
Try a binomial probability table or use a binomial probability function, which is this: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] For 1), find P(0): x = 0 n = 20 p = .09 q = .91 (q is 1-p) For 2), find P(1) x = 1 n,p,q same as 1) For 3), find P(3) x = 3 n,p,q same as 1) For 4), take 1 - P(0...
Monday, April 8, 2013 at 3:50pm by MathGuru

Math
p = .65 (1-p) = .35 binomial distribution, n = 3 binomial coefs for n = 3 are 1, 3, 3, 1 probability of three women, zero men in three = coef(3,0)(p)^3 (1-p)^0 = 1 (.65)^3 (1) = .2746 = 27%
Sunday, March 2, 2008 at 4:34pm by Damon

Math
I guess I will have to use binomial coefficients. the probability of k successes in n trials is: P(k) = C(n,k) p^k (1-p)^(n-k) C(n,k) is binomial coef get from Pascal triangle or table or calculate from C(n,k) - n! / [ k! (n-k)! ] here p = prob of ace = .25 (1-p) = .75 n = 4 k...
Sunday, January 27, 2013 at 3:30pm by Damon

statistics
Use a binomial probability formula or use a binomial probability table. Formula: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] P(1) = (3C1)(.8^1)(.2^2) I'll let you finish the calculation. If you use the table, p = .8 (for 80%), n = 3 (sample size), x = 1. (Note: q in the formula is 1-p or .2). ...
Saturday, February 4, 2012 at 7:41pm by MathGuru

math/statistics
Could anyone explaint to me what role the Binomial Theory plays in statistics and probability? Using statistics, we can make statements about a population based on sample data. Probability helps us make those statements. The binomial theory can be used to determine ...
Tuesday, March 6, 2007 at 10:11pm by Jennie

Statistics
The probability of success, p, is 3/350 = .00857 so (1-p) = .99142 Your number of trials is five, n=5 The probability of k successes in n trials is [binomial coeff n,k) p^k (1-p)^(n-k) row five of Pascal's triangle (my easy way to get binomial coefficients rather than doing n...
Wednesday, December 26, 2007 at 2:36pm by Damon

statistics
Use a binomial probability formula or use a binomial probability table. Formula: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] For a): Find P(0) for none For b): Take 1 - P(0) for at least 1 For c): Find P(6) for all If you use the table, p = .04, n = 6 (sample size), x = the values needed for a...
Monday, March 17, 2014 at 5:41pm by MathGuru

Probability
A salesperson contacts eight potential customers per day. From past experience, we know that the probability of a potentail customer making a purchase is 0.10. a) What is the probability the salesperson will make at least two sales in a day? -Do you use binomial formula for ...
Thursday, November 23, 2006 at 2:56pm by Janice

Statistics
If you are asked to do this by hand, try the binomial probability formula: P(x) = nCx * p^x * q^(n-x) Note: * means to multiply; ^ means raised to the power of. For a), use: x = 0, 1, 2, 3 n = 12 p = .10 q = 1 - p = .90 I'll let you substitute the values and take it from here...
Sunday, August 29, 2010 at 3:15pm by MathGuru

Math
p=probability of scoring (success) = 0.8 q=probability of not scoring (failure = 0.2 Assuming the probability does not change over time and is independent of previous results, then we can apply the binomial distribution: P(7+ out of 8) =8C7*0.8^70.2+8C80.8^8 =0.34+.17 =0.50 (...
Friday, May 24, 2013 at 10:03pm by MathMate

Math
If we can assume random trials, and that probability remains constant (at 1/2). Use binomial distribution. N=5 (no. of trials), n=3 (no. of successes), p=1/2 (probability), q=(1-p)=1/2 P(3 out of 5) =C(5,3)p^3q^(5-3) =5!/(2!3!) (1/2)^3(1/2)^2 =10/32 =5/16
Tuesday, July 31, 2012 at 2:01am by MathMate

Math
It is a binomial distribution, with p=0.6 (probability of success) q=0.4 (probability of failure) n=5 (number of steps) r=2 or 3 (number of successes) P(n,r)=nCr p^r q^(n-r) P(5,2)=5C2 0.6^2 0.4^3 =(5!)/(3!2!) 0.6^2 0.4^3 = 10(0.36)(0.064) = 0.2304 Similarly, for 3 tails, r=3...
Saturday, May 25, 2013 at 2:51pm by MathMate

Statistics
If you are asked to do this by hand, try the binomial probability formula: P(x) = nCx * p^x * q^(n-x) Note: * means to multiply; ^ means raised to the power of. For a), use: x = 2 n = 8 p = .10 q = 1 - p = .90 I'll let you substitute the values and take it from here. An ...
Sunday, August 29, 2010 at 3:14pm by MathGuru

elementary stats
Find P(0), P(1), and P(2). Add together for your probability. You can use a binomial probability table to determine each of the probabilities.
Thursday, February 23, 2012 at 11:04pm by MathGuru

math -binomial probability
astrid and iman are planing a vaction trip to the island of capri, where the probability of snow on any day is 0.35. what is the probability that during their five days on the island , they will have snow on exactly three of the five days?
Monday, February 28, 2011 at 6:55pm by bryanna

statistics
Here is the easiest way to do this problem. Use a binomial probability table. n = 5 x = 0, 1, 2 p = .75 Add P(0), P(1), and P(2). This will be your probability. I hope this helps.
Tuesday, October 18, 2011 at 8:02pm by MathGuru

Statistics
Find the normal approximation for the binomial probability that x = 5, where n = 12 and p = 0.7. Compare this probability to the value of P(x=5) found in Table 2 of Appendix B in your textbook.
Thursday, October 20, 2011 at 7:50am by jane

Statistics-Probability
Consider a binomial random variable X with parameters(4,1/2). Find the conditional probability mass function of X given that X is odd
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 at 3:28am by sand

statistics; emergency please help me
Assume a binomial probability distribution has p = .60 and n = 200. c. What is the probability of 100 to 110 successes (to 4 decimals)? d.What is the probability of 130 or more successes (to 4 decimals)?
Tuesday, April 8, 2014 at 9:15pm by Vanessa

statistics; emergency please help me
Assume a binomial probability distribution has p = .60 and n = 200. a. What is the probability of 100 to 110 successes (to 4 decimals)? b. What is the probability of 130 or more successes (to 4 decimals)?
Thursday, April 10, 2014 at 9:29pm by Vanessa

statistics
Recall that if the following conditions are met, we can use a binomial distribution to model the situation: 1. there are only two possible outcomes (operating or not operating, i.e. a bernoulli experiment) 2. probability applies to all units observed, and does not change. 3. ...
Wednesday, December 26, 2012 at 9:14pm by MathMate

statistics
Find the indicated binomial probabilities. Round to the nearest 3 decimal places. In a local college, 20% of the math majors are women. Ten math majors are chosen at random. 1) What is the probability that exactly 2 are women? 2) What is the probability that 2 or less women ...
Tuesday, March 23, 2010 at 2:19pm by please help me!

Statistics
The probability of three purchases after seven customer visits is P(3) = (0.6)^3*(0.4)^4*C(7,3) where C(7,3) is the binomial coefficient C(7,3) = 7!/(4!*3!) = 70 I get 0.387 for the answer. For P(n>4), add P(5), P(6) and P(7) For an explanation of how the probability ...
Sunday, August 24, 2008 at 11:00pm by drwls

statistics
Assume a binomial probability distribution has p = .60 and n = 200. c. What is the probability of 100 to 110 successes (to 4 decimals)? d. What is the probability of 130 or more successes (to 4 decimals)?
Sunday, April 6, 2014 at 9:01pm by Vanessa

statistics
Assume a binomial probability distribution has p = .60 and n = 200. c. What is the probability of 100 to 110 successes (to 4 decimals)? d. What is the probability of 130 or more successes (to 4 decimals)?
Monday, April 7, 2014 at 5:14pm by vanessa

STATS
The probability of a manufacturing defect in an aluminum beverage can is .00003. If 100,100 cans are produced, (a) Find the approximate probability of at least two defective cans. (Round your answer to 4 decimal places.) (b) Find the approximate probability of at least three ...
Saturday, October 30, 2010 at 7:13pm by Helen

statistics
You can use a binomial probability table to determine the probability. Find P(18) through P(25), then add all the probabilities together for a total.
Monday, November 14, 2011 at 2:32pm by MathGuru

Another binomial distribution question
You can also take 1 - [P(0) + P(1)], which is easier than finding P(2) through P(10). This way you will just need to find P(0) and P(1). Either way you can still use a binomial probability table or calculate by hand. I hope this will also help.
Saturday, August 25, 2007 at 11:32pm by MathGuru

statistics
Find the indicated binomial probabilities. Round to the nearest 3 decimal places. In a local college, 20% of the math majors are women. Ten math majors are chosen at random. 1) What is the probability that exactly 2 are women? 2) What is the probability that 2 or less women ...
Tuesday, March 23, 2010 at 2:20pm by please help me!

math check
x is a binomial random variable. (Give your answers correct to three decimal places.) (e) Calculate the probability of x for: n = 3, x = 1, p = 0.45 P(x) = .I got 0.41 (f) Calculate the probability of x for: n = 6, x = 6, p = 0.25 P(x) = I got 1.50
Friday, June 7, 2013 at 8:31pm by Gayle 57

math help please
two cards are dealt in succession from a standard deck of cards. what is the probability that the second card is red give that the first card was a heart. so i do p(R/H), then i know you go R*H/H. but how do i get the probability please explain! thanks. if 2 dice are rolled, ...
Monday, January 19, 2009 at 10:35am by Kennedy

statistics
Consider a binomial experiment with 20 trials and a probability of 0.45 on a single trial.Use the normal distribution to find the probability of exactly 10 successes.
Friday, March 21, 2014 at 10:18pm by john

Probability
The problem satisfies the following conditions: -the experiment is a Bernoulli experiment (i.e. each trial has one of two outcomes) - the probability of each trial is known remains constant throughout the experiment - each trial is independent of the others. This indicates a ...
Saturday, January 5, 2013 at 10:27pm by MathMate

algebra 2
this binomial can be factored as the product of a binomial and trinomial. Enter the binomial factor. 64y^15 + 125
Tuesday, December 6, 2011 at 9:41am by jewl

Statistics
In a particular suburb 30% of housholds have installed electronic security systems. If 2 households are chosen at random from this area, what is the probability that neither has installed a security system? Using the binomial probability function for this problem: P(x) = (nCx...
Monday, February 26, 2007 at 3:30pm by Jason L

statistics/probability
One statistic used to assess professional golfers is driving accuracy, the percent of drives that land in the fairway. Driving accuracy for PGA Tour professionals ranges from about 40% to about 75%. Tiger Woods hits the fairway about 60% of the time. One reason why the Normal ...
Thursday, June 17, 2010 at 10:47pm by Natash

Binomial and Poisson distribution
A machine produces ribbon in which flaws occur randomly at an average rate of one flaw in 100m. Find the probability that there are 3 or more flaws in a randomly chosen 200m of ribbon. Find the length of ribbon such that the probability that it contains no flaws is 0.001. ( Is...
Saturday, June 1, 2013 at 8:01pm by Kelvin

Probability
For each of the following statements, determine whether it is true (meaning, always true) or false (meaning, not always true). Here, we assume all random variables are discrete, and that all expectations are well-defined and finite. Let X and Y be two binomial random variables...
Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at 11:37am by qwerty

statistic
Quiz has 6 questions. Each question has five possible answers, only one of each 5 answers is correct. If student randomly guesses on all six questions, what is the probability to answer 2 questions right? Tip: first, you have to define parameters of Binomial distribution: n - ...
Saturday, December 4, 2010 at 11:16pm by tanya

Finite Math
Binomial probability function: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] x = 4 n = 5 p = .8 q = 1 - p = .2 With your data: P(4) = (5C4)(.8^4)[.2^(5-4)] I'll let you finish the calculation.
Wednesday, October 17, 2012 at 10:45pm by MathGuru

math
What is the probability of 5 or fewer successes in a binomial experiment with 7 trials if in each trial, the porbability of success is .8?
Tuesday, April 16, 2013 at 7:27am by Moyer

check math
If x is a binomial random variable, calculate the probability of x for each case. n=4, x=1, p=0.3 answer 0.4116
Sunday, June 2, 2013 at 12:00am by Sue

statistics
Find P(6), P(7), P(8), P(9), and P(10). The easiest way to do this would be to use a binomial probability function table. Find each value, then add together for your probability.
Tuesday, October 5, 2010 at 2:06pm by MathGuru

Statistics
If you use a binomial probability table, x = 4, p = 2/3 (convert to a decimal), and n = 5. Check the table for your probability.
Friday, September 24, 2010 at 8:01am by MathGuru

statistics
Consider a binomial experiment with 20 trials and probability 0.45 on a single trial. Use the normal distribution to find the probability of exactly 10 successes. Round your answer to the thousandths place.
Tuesday, May 17, 2011 at 9:18am by coya

statistics
Consider a binomial experiment with 20 trials and probability 0.45 on a single trial. Use the normal distribution to find the probability of exactly 10 successes. Round your answer to the thousandths place.
Tuesday, August 2, 2011 at 9:51am by lee

Statistics
You can use a binomial probability table, or calculate by hand using the following formula: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] p = .39 q = 1 - p n = 12 For (a): find P(3) For (b): find P(0),P(1),P(2),P(3). Add for a total, then subtract from 1 for your probability. For (c): find P(0...
Saturday, March 30, 2013 at 1:18pm by MathGuru

statistics
The easiest way to do this would be to use a binomial probability function table, with n = 5, x = 5, and p = 1/3 (convert the fraction to a decimal). Look up those values in the table for your probability.
Tuesday, November 9, 2010 at 1:00pm by MathGuru

MATH 12
binomial distribution p white = 6/14 = 3/7 p yellow = 1 - pwhite = 4/7 in three trials, what is the chance of drawing exactly 3 white? The binomial coef of 3 out of three is 1 because 3!/(3!(3-3)!) = 1 P(3/3) = 1 * (3/7)^3 * (4/7)^0 so (3/7)^3 What is the probability of ...
Tuesday, August 5, 2008 at 8:38pm by Damon

Math Probability
A binomial distribution applies when 1. Trials have exactly two possible outcomes 2. probabilities remain constant throughout trials. 3. there is a defined number of trials. 4. trials are independent of each other. 5. the random variable is the number of successes. Since the ...
Monday, April 16, 2012 at 2:03pm by MathMate

Statistics
The easiest way to do this problem is to use a binomial probability table. If you do this, you will need to find P(3), P(4), P(5), and P(6). In the table, n = 6, p = .14, x = 3, 4, 5, 6 (for each one). Add all these probabilities together for the total probability. I hope this...
Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 5:42pm by MathGuru

Math check and question
x is a binomial random variable. (Give your answers correct to three decimal places.) (a) Calculate the probability of x for: n = 1, x = 0, p = 0.15 P(x) = Correct: Your answer is correct. . (0.85) (b) Calculate the probability of x for: n = 3, x = 3, p = 0.15 P(x) = Incorrect...
Thursday, June 6, 2013 at 6:03pm by Nora 57

statistics
Find P(4) and P(5). Add both together for your probability. You can use a binomial probability table, which is easier, or do this by hand using the following formula: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] Use the values given in your problem to calculate P(4) and P(5).
Saturday, September 24, 2011 at 4:55pm by MathGuru

Statistics
The experiment consists of 10 bernoulli (either true or false) experiments over one week. The probability of success p is 0.3 (so failure, q=0.7) The probability does not change throughout the week. This is a binomial distribution, where the probability of r success out of n ...
Tuesday, June 12, 2012 at 5:00pm by MathMate

Statistics
Use a binomial probability table or a formula like the following: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] For a): Find P(2) For b): Find P(2), P(3), and P(4). Add together for your probability. For c): Find P(0) and P(1). Add together for your probability.
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at 5:18pm by MathGuru

Statistics
Binomial probability.
Friday, March 1, 2013 at 9:57pm by MathGuru

Statistics
a) Binomial distribution b) mean = np = 15 * .80 = ? sd = √npq = √(15)(.80)(.20) = ? Note: q = 1 - p I'll let you finish the calculation. c) Use a binomial probability table. n = 15, p = .80, x = 10 d) You can approximate a normal distribution by using z-scores. ...
Friday, March 2, 2012 at 9:15am by MathGuru

algebra
the binomial 8y^12+z^6 can be factored into a binomial and a trinomial. the binomial factor is (2y^4+z^2). whats the trinomial?
Tuesday, April 3, 2012 at 9:50pm by jessica

stastics
You will need to find P(3), P(4), and P(5). Add those values for your probability. You can use a binomial probability table, or calculate by hand using the following formula: P(x) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] x = 3,4,5 n = 5 p = 130/680 = 0.19 q = 1 - p = 1 - 0.19 = 0.81 I'll let you...
Wednesday, April 3, 2013 at 10:21am by MathGuru

statistics- normal approximation
Find the normal approximation for the binomial probability that x = 5, where n = 12 and p = 0.7. Compare this probability to the value of P(x=5) found in Table 2 of Appendix B in your textbook.
Wednesday, October 27, 2010 at 10:22pm by don

statistics
Use a binomial probability table or use the formula to do this by hand: P(0) = (nCx)(p^x)[q^(n-x)] n = 3 x = 0 p = .86 q = 1 - p Substitute the values into the formula and calculate P(0). Then subtract from 1 for your probability.
Sunday, September 25, 2011 at 6:25pm by MathGuru

Math
Expand Your Knowledge: Negative Binomial Distribution Suppose you have binomial trials for which the probability of success on each trial is p and the probability of failure is q= 1-p. Let k be a fixed whole number greater than or equal to 1. Let n be the number of the trial ...
Monday, May 21, 2012 at 9:40pm by Billy

Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | Next>>

Search
Members