Friday
April 18, 2014

Search: how many moles of H2O molecule are contained in 3.00 mol of FeSO4*5H2O

Number of results: 38,103

Chemistry
Take a 100 g sample. 45.3 g H2O 54.7 g FeSO4 Convert to moles. 54.7g/151.9 = 0.360 45.3/18 = 2.52 You want the FeSO4 to be 1 so we divide the FeSO4 by itself; i.e., 0.360/0.360 = 1.00 Then to keep things equal we divide the moles H2O by the same value. 2.52/0.360 = 6.99 which ...
Tuesday, November 23, 2010 at 12:48am by DrBob222

Chemistry
I'll let you in on a little secret; we are not REQUIRED (although it looks better) to convert kg to grams. So how many kgmoles are in 1.00 kg FeSO4.7H2O 1.00 kg/molar mass FeSO4.7H2O (in kg) = 1.00/276 = zz kg moles Then zz moles FeSO4.7H2O x (1 mole Fe/1 mole FeSO4.7H2O) x (1...
Saturday, March 13, 2010 at 9:24pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Ok. Please. Check. Thank you both so much. Mass of water: 43.0-26.1=16.9 g H2O Moles of water: (16.9 g H2O)(1 mol H2O/18.0 g H2O)= 0.939 mol H2O Moles of cobalt (II) sulfite: CoSO3= 58.9332+32.066+3(15.9994)=138.9974 g/mol (26.1 g CuSO3)(1 mol CuSO4/138.9974 g CuSO3)= 0.188 ...
Friday, October 26, 2012 at 7:52pm by Elizabeth

chemistry
How many moles of water are contained in 0.250 mol of CuSo4 x 5H2O?
Thursday, February 25, 2010 at 9:15pm by yazmin

Chemistry
(0.3250)(0.09877g) = 0.03210 g Cu - - - -> also moles of CuSO4 0.03210 g Cu / 63.55 g/mol = 5.05x10^-4 moles Cu - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 mole BaSO4 = 233.4 g 0.11666g BaSO4 / 233.4 g/mole = 5.000x10^-4 moles BaSO4 (confirms mol Cu = moles SO4 as expected in...
Thursday, June 11, 2009 at 2:55pm by GK

chemistry
I'm not quite sure if you want 3.5M CuSO4 or 3.5M CuSO4.5H2O. I am assuming the former and want to start with CuSO4.5H2O. How many mols CuSO4 do you want? That's M x L = 3.5 x 0.250 = about 0.9 but you need to do that more accurately. Since there is 1 mol CuSO4 in 1 mol CuSO4....
Thursday, January 10, 2013 at 5:49pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
How many moles of oxygen atoms are contained in 1.86 x 10-2 mol CuSO4·5H2O
Tuesday, March 22, 2011 at 4:28pm by JK

Chemistry/Math
1 is ok. Your answer for 2 defines 1 mol as 6.022 x 10^23 molecules which we already know; in act, I wrote that in mu response. You want 1000 g converted to moles. 1000 g x (1 mol H2O/18.015 g H2O) = ?? moles. Then ?? moles H2O x (6.022 x10^23 molecules/1 mole H2O) = xx ...
Saturday, August 21, 2010 at 1:01pm by DrBob222

chemistry
CuSO4.5H2O ==> Cu^+2 + SO4^- + 5H2O Convert 3.70 g CuSO4.5H2O to mols CuSO4.5H2O. Then for each mol of the starting material, you obtain 1 mol Cu^+2 ions and 1 mol SO4^-2 ions. Add those together to find the total mols. I've not added the H2O since that doesn't ionize (at ...
Friday, October 31, 2008 at 12:09pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
The molecular formula is as followed: 6NO + 4NH3 --->5N2 + 6H2O The ratio of moles of NO to H2O is 1 to 1. 225.0g of NO/30.01 g of NO/mol= moles of NO Moles of NO=Moles of H20 Moles of H2O *18.02g of H2O/mol= mass of H2O
Tuesday, January 29, 2013 at 10:50pm by Devron

Chemistry
The reaction is: Al2S3(s) + 6H2O(l) --> 2Al(OH)3(s) + 3H2S(g) (40.5gAl2S3)/(150.16 g/mol) = 0.270 moles Al2S3 (0.110 mol H2O)(1 mol.Al2S3/6mol.H2O)=0.0183mol Al2S3 NEEDED. We have 0.270 moles Al2S3 AVAILABLE. So, H2O is the limiting reagent. The moles of Al(OH)3 produced is...
Thursday, May 21, 2009 at 5:58pm by GK

Chemistry
The reaction is: Al2S3(s) + 6H2O(l) --> 2Al(OH)3(s) + 3H2S(g) (40.5gAl2S3)/(150.16 g/mol) = 0.270 moles Al2S3 (0.110 mol H2O)(1 mol.Al2S3/6mol.H2O)=0.0183mol Al2S3 NEEDED. We have 0.270 moles Al2S3 AVAILABLE. So, H2O is the limiting reagent. The moles of Al(OH)3 produced is...
Thursday, May 21, 2009 at 5:58pm by GK

Chemistry
Well, it's a long story. First, I misread the problem and worked it initially (and typed all of it out) and discovered before I punched the post answer button that the problem did NOT ask for H2 but for H2O. So I went back and corrected here and there and posted the response; ...
Tuesday, October 19, 2010 at 7:39pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Someone else did a problem just like it, and here is his setup; I just changed the numbers, and you should check my numbers mass of C in sample = mass of C in CO2 mass of C in sample = (0.3051 g CO2 / 44 g/mol)(1 mol C / 1 mol CO2)(12 g/mol) = 0.08321 g mass of H in sample = ...
Thursday, March 14, 2013 at 7:16pm by Devron

Chemistry
2Al + 3CuSO4.5H2O ==>3Cu + Al2(SO4)3 + 5H2O Convert g Al to moles. Convert g CuSO4.5H2O to moles. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation convert moles Al and moles CuSO4.5H2O (in separate operations) to moles of any product. The reagent producing the SMALLER moles ...
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 at 10:04pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
There are 9 oxygen atoms in 1 molecule of CuSO4.5H2O (which is the same as saying there are 9 moles oxygen atoms in 1 mole of CuSO4.5H2O). So 0.0186 moles CuSO4.5H2O must contain 9*0.0186 moles oxygen atoms.
Tuesday, March 22, 2011 at 4:28pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
H2 + O2 -> H2O balancing this, 2H2 + O2 -> 2H2O then we find the limiting reactant. To determine the limiting reactant, we get the moles of product from the given moles of reactant. Whichever yield less number of moles of product is the limiting reactant. thus, 4 mol H2...
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 at 1:56am by Jai

Chemistry
For the unbalanced reaction: FeSO4 (s) → Fe 2O3 (s) + SO2 (g) + O2 (g) ; how many total moles of gas are produced from the decomposition of 9.98 mol FeSO4 (s)?
Monday, September 24, 2012 at 1:06pm by Misha

Chemistry
0.250 mole CuSO4.5H2O x (5 moles H2O/1 mole CuSO4.5H2O) = ?? moles H2O.
Friday, December 31, 2010 at 2:50pm by DrBob222

chemistry
1.8 g H2O x (1 mol/18g) = 0.1 mol H2O. There are two moles H per mol H2O; therefore, 0.2 mol of H atoms. 0.2 x (1 g H/1 mol H) = 0.2 grams H needed.
Friday, March 5, 2010 at 9:46pm by DrBob222

chemistry
No. CuSO4.5H2O means 1 mol CuSO4 + 5 mol H2O. The molar mass is Cu + S + 4*O + 5*H2O = about 249.5 If we could put it in the right place on the computer it would be a period in the middle of the line. We can't do that with the computer so we write it as a period on the line. ...
Monday, February 25, 2013 at 6:09pm by DrBob222

AP Chemistry
The system CO2(g) + H2(g)<->H2O(g) + CO(g) is at equilibrium at some temperature. At equilibrium a 4.00 L vessel contains 1.00 mole CO2, 1.00 mole H2, 2.40 moles H2O, and 2.40 moles CO. How many moles of CO2 must be added to the system to bring the equilibrium CO ...
Monday, December 2, 2013 at 9:18pm by Gabriella

ap chemistry
The system CO2(g) + H2(g) *) H2O(g) + CO(g) is at equilibrium at some temperature. At equilibrium a 4.00 L vessel contains 1.00 mole CO2, 1.00 mole H2, 2.40 moles H2O, and 2.40 moles CO. How many moles of CO2 must be added to the system to bring the equilibrium CO ...
Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 6:32pm by cheri

chemistry
Let's call acetic acid HAc. 5.00% HAc by mass means 5.00 g HAc in 100 g solution. moles in 5.00 g = 5.00/molar mass HAc. You can do the math. The 100 g soln is made of 5.00 g HAc 95.0 g H2O. moles H2O in 95.0 g H2O = 95.0/molar mass H2O. You can do the math. mole fraction HAc...
Monday, October 18, 2010 at 8:25pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Calculate the mass of the solid you must measure out to prepare 100 mL of 0.025 M CuSO4. Note that this salt is a hydrate, so its formula is CuSO4⋅5H2O. You must include the waters of hydration when calculating the formula weights. Would the following set-up yield the ...
Wednesday, February 11, 2009 at 2:17am by Jake

chemistry
2H2 + O2 ==> 2H2O Assuming the 10 moles H2 had all the oxygen needed to react completely, then 10 moles H2 x (2 moles H2O/2 moles H2) = 10 moles H2 x 2/2 = 10 x 1/1 = 10 moles H2O? 10 moles x 18.015 g/mol = 180.15 grams. If we use the density of water as 1.00 g/mL, then 180...
Monday, September 21, 2009 at 9:17pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Oxygen is a diatomic molecule. It exists as O2 and not O. 128g/32 = 4.00 moles. 4.00 x 22.4L/mol = 89.6 L.
Monday, January 16, 2012 at 9:32pm by DrBob222

CHEM
mass of C in sample = mass of C in CO2 mass of C in sample = (0.8635 g CO2 / 44 g/mol)(1 mol C / 1 mol CO2)(12 g/mol) = 0.2355 g mass of H in sample = mass of H in H2O mass of H in sample = (0.1767 g H2O / 18 g/mol)(2 mol H / 1 mol H2O)(1 g/mol) = 0.0196 g mass of O in sample...
Thursday, March 14, 2013 at 7:07pm by shane

Chemistry
You need to correct the equation. 2H2 + O2 ==> 2H2O 65.00 g H2O = how many moles? 65/18 = xx moles H2O. moles oxygen = 1/2 moles H2O, then convert to grams oxygen. moles H2 = same as moles H2O, convert to grmas hydrogen. You must have
Wednesday, October 13, 2010 at 2:11pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Check my thinking on this. CxHy + O2 ==> CO2 + H2O CxHy = 0.20 mol CO2 = 0.80 mol H2O = 1.0 mol Convert 0.20 mol CxHy to 1.0 mol by multiplying by 5. Therefore, we should get 5 x 0.80 mol CO2 (4.0 mols) and 5 x 1.0 mol H2O (5.0 mols). The equation must be something like ...
Monday, September 29, 2008 at 10:38pm by DrBob222

chem
First convert each percentage to grams. 37.51g C x (1 mol C/12.01g C)= 3.123 mol C 4.20g H x (1 mol H/1.008 g H)= 4.17 mol H 58.29 O x (1 mol O/16.00 g O)= 3.643 mol O Since C has the lowest moles divide each mole by the moles of Carbon. C= 1 mole H= 1.34 moles O= 1.167 moles ...
Sunday, November 14, 2010 at 4:14pm by Sarah

chemistry........help!! =)
Look at the units! M=mol/L so, given: 0.010 mol/L and 0.50 L take the product of (0.010 mol/L)(0.50 L) to get mol of FeSO4. To get grams, multiply by the molar mass of FeSO4
Monday, December 13, 2010 at 3:02pm by TutorCat

Chemistry+Empirical formula
Cu = 25.3/63.54 = 0.398 (You have 3 places in 25.3 so don't throw anything away, at least not yet). S = 12.9/32.064 = 0.402 O = 25.7/15.999 = 1.606 H2O = 36.1/18.015 = 2.00 Now we divide everything by the smallest, which is 0.398 Cu = 0.398/0.398 = 1.000 S = 0.402/0.398 = 1.01...
Thursday, January 15, 2009 at 11:48pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Get first the number of moles (n) of each species. To get the moles, divide the mass by the molar mass. To get the molar mass, get a periodic table and add the individual mass of the elements in the chemical formula. H2O (water): 2*1 + 1*16 = 18 g/mol C3H8O3 (glycerine): 3*12...
Friday, November 29, 2013 at 12:25am by Jai

Chemistry
Get first the number of moles (n) of each species. To get the moles, divide the mass by the molar mass. To get the molar mass, get a periodic table and add the individual mass of the elements in the chemical formula. H2O (water): 2*1 + 1*16 = 18 g/mol C3H8O3 (glycerine): 3*12...
Friday, November 29, 2013 at 12:27am by Jai

Chemistry
22.0 mL CO2 = how many moles. That is 22.0 mL x (1 mol/22,400 ml) = ? mol CO2. Now convert that to mole H2O. ?mole CO2 x (2 moles H2O/1 mole CO2) = ? mole CO2 x 2/1 and that x 22,400 mL/mol will convert to mL H2O. There is a shortcut you can use when working will all gases. ...
Friday, December 9, 2011 at 12:56am by DrBob222

CHEM! (SCIENCE) NEED HELP
12 moles of H20 6 moles of NO 3 moles of Cu=4 moles of H2O=2 moles NO 9 mol of Cu*( 4 mol of H20/3 mol of Cu) = 12 moles of H2O 9 mol of Cu*( 2 mol of NO/3 mol of Cu) = 6 moles of NO
Thursday, January 24, 2013 at 6:06pm by Devron

Chemistry
how many moles of water are contained in 0.250 mile of CuSO4 * 5H2O? please help me
Friday, December 31, 2010 at 2:50pm by Kiran

Chemistry
1 mol H2O is 18 grams. The factor used in dimensional analysis is 1 mol H2O/18 g H2O or 18g H2O/1 mol H2O. 1 mol/18 g H2O means 1 mol H2O/18 g H2O. I don't understand what's confusing about "There's one mol (of water) for every 18 g of H2O." Perhaps my (of water) addition ...
Thursday, February 7, 2013 at 11:16pm by DrBob222

Intro Chemistry
Which molecule based on the following enthalpies is the most stable? Molecule A: -70 kJ/mol Molecule B: 100 kJ/mol Molecule C: 145 kJ/mol Is it Molecule A? Isn't the lower the enthalpy the more stable the molecule? Thank You
Sunday, April 4, 2010 at 8:08pm by echem

chemistry
The confusing part here is that you want a solution of CusO4 but you have given CuSO4.5H2O to make it. What to remember. 1 mol CuSO4 = 1 mol CuSO4.5H2O; therefore, you want how many mols CuSO4? That's M x L = 0.850 x 0.400 = ? But that's the same number of mols you want for ...
Monday, July 15, 2013 at 5:15am by DrBob222

Chemistry
You work it the same way you do any stoichiometry problem. You know Na is the limiting reagent, it will be completely consumed; therefore, how much H2O must be used according to the equation? It must be 4.00moles Na x (2 moles H2O/2 moles Na) = 4.00 x (1) = 4.00 moles H2O. You...
Thursday, January 27, 2011 at 11:56pm by DrBob222

Last Chemistry Question!
You don't unless it's moles of a solvent. You could have 5 moles water and calculate the volume that would occupy if you knew the density. 5 mols H2O x (18 gH2O/1 mol H2O) = grams H2O, then mass H2O = volume H2O x density H2O
Sunday, February 19, 2012 at 11:21pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
In a reaction vessel, 2.4 mol of Al(OH)3 and 5.3 mol of H2SO4 react. Products: Al2(SO4)3, H2O [I know...] Moles of Al2(SO4)3 in container:1.2mol Moles of H2O in container:7.2 mol [But not...] Moles of excess reactant in container:____mol how do i find it?
Sunday, April 17, 2011 at 10:10pm by Marriot

Physics
(2.00 L) x (273 / (20 + 273)) / (22.414 L/mol) = 0.083139 mol air in the "empty" container (7.20 g H2O) / (18.01532 g H2O/mol) = 0.39966 mol H2O added Supposing all the water vaporized: PV = nRT P = nRT / V = (0.083139 mol + 0.39966 mol) x (0.08205746 L atm/K mol) ...
Saturday, June 22, 2013 at 12:21pm by Aris

Chemistry ?
How many moles are contained in a 4.67-L sample of gas at 30°C and 199 kPa? A. 1.7 mol B. 11.8 mol C. 0.37 mol D. 3.7 mol I guessed D, but I'm not sure.
Thursday, August 15, 2013 at 12:57pm by Kaylee

help with stochiometry
can someone help me out with this one? balanced equation is: 2H2 + O2 > 2H2O My questions are: How many molecules of water are produced from 2.0 * 10 ^23 molecules of oxygen? How many moles of water are produced from 22.5 moles of oxygen? OK. First, it depends on if you ...
Wednesday, January 24, 2007 at 11:03am by iearn

chemistry
6. Determine Keq for the reaction: 2 SO2 (g) + O2(g) 2 SO3(g), given that 1.00 x 10-2 moles of SO2 and 2.00 x 10-2 moles of O2 were placed in a 2.00L reaction chamber. The chamber contained 7.5 x 10-3 moles of SO3 when equilibrium was established at 727oC. (PV = nRT, R = 0....
Thursday, February 25, 2010 at 7:37pm by Olivia

chemistry
6. Determine Keq for the reaction: 2 SO2 (g) + O2(g) 2 SO3(g), given that 1.00 x 10-2 moles of SO2 and 2.00 x 10-2 moles of O2 were placed in a 2.00L reaction chamber. The chamber contained 7.5 x 10-3 moles of SO3 when equilibrium was established at 727oC. (PV = nRT, R = 0....
Thursday, February 25, 2010 at 7:39pm by Olivia

COLLEGE CHEMISTRY
6. Determine Keq for the reaction: 2 SO2 (g) + O2(g) 2 SO3(g), given that 1.00 x 10-2 moles of SO2 and 2.00 x 10-2 moles of O2 were placed in a 2.00L reaction chamber. The chamber contained 7.5 x 10-3 moles of SO3 when equilibrium was established at 727oC. (PV = nRT, R = 0....
Thursday, February 25, 2010 at 3:50pm by Olivia

Chem
No, you calculated the number of atoms in the molecule. The question is for moles. There are two moles of hydrogen per mole of H2O and one mole 0f oxygen per mole of H2O. Therefore, for 2 moles of H2O, there are 4 moles of hydrogen and 2 moles of oxygen.
Monday, July 6, 2009 at 4:22pm by DrBob222

Chemistry stoch1
First we write the balanced chemical reaction involved: 3Fe + 4H2O -> Fe3O4 + 4H2 Since we have 18 g of steam, we have to convert this to moles and use the stoich ratios from the reaction to get amount of Fe needed to react with it. To convert mass to moles, we get the ...
Saturday, September 21, 2013 at 11:54am by Jai

Chemistry
a) Convert 0.0250 g XeF6 to moles. moles = grams/molar mass. Convert moles XeF6 to moles H2O. moles XeF6 x (1 mole H2O/1 mole XeF6) = mol XeF6 x 1 = ? Then convert moles H2O to grams. g = moles x molar mass. b)You CAN work three stoichiometry problems here; i.e., 0.250 g Xe ...
Sunday, January 22, 2012 at 11:02pm by DrBob222

Chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
You have 65.0 g soln from HI and 84.0 g H2O with the KOH so total mass soln is 149 g. q = mass H2O x specific heat water x (delta T). USUALLY delta H for a reaction is done in kJ/mol. This problem has no easy way to get to moles but q/mol = J/mol and you can convert that to kJ...
Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 1:06am by DrBob222

Chemistry
H occurs as a diatomic molecule (as does oxygen) so the equation should be 2H2 + O2 ==> 2H2O (10 moles H2 will produce 10 moles H2O --ONLY IF there is sufficient oxygen present and that will be 5 moles oxygen needed for 10 moles H2). 1 mole H2O has a molar mass of 18 grams...
Saturday, January 15, 2011 at 8:09pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Hi, could someone please take a look at my solution to this problem and let me know if it's correct? I would really appreciate some help. Calculate the theoretical yield for K3[Fe(C2O4)3]*3H2O; 491.258 g/mol Mass of Ferrous Ammonium Sulfate Hexahyrdreate: 4.01 g, 392.17 g/mol...
Monday, March 25, 2013 at 7:24pm by Constantine

Chemistry
I don't really understand why unit analysis works. I found a simple example on a website (I can post the link in a comment if you want). It says, For example, convert 18 grams of water to moles. The molar mass of water is 18 g/mol; therefore : 18g H2O x 1 mol/18g H2O = 1 mol ...
Thursday, February 7, 2013 at 11:16pm by A Canadian

chemistry
BaCl2*2H2O --> BaCl2 +2H20 4.36g ............... 3.72 ... 0.643g Convert each of the mass of product to moles. 3.72 g BaCl2 x (1 mol BaCl2 / 208.3 g BaCl2) = 0.0179 mol BaCl2 0.643g H2O x (1 mol H2O / 18.0 g H2O) = 0.0357 mol H2O Mole H2O / mole BaCl2 = 2 / 1
Sunday, January 24, 2010 at 9:16pm by Fat

AP Chemistry
The equilibrium constant for thermal dissociation of F2 F2(g)<->2F(g) is 0.300. If initially 1.00 mol F2 is placed in a 1.00 L container, which of the following is the correct number of moles of F2 that have dissociated at equilibrium? 1. 0.130 mol 2. 0.418 mol 3. 0.548 ...
Tuesday, November 26, 2013 at 8:16pm by Gabriella

Chemistry
Methanal is also formaldehyde, which has a chemical formula of HCHO (or CH2O). Molarity is moles of solute per liter of solution. Thus we can say there are 1.33 moles of CH2O in 1 L of solution. To get the mole fraction, we also need to get the moles of H2O. To do this, we get...
Saturday, August 10, 2013 at 1:33am by Jai

Chemistry II
You should have shown the reaction. I assume it is CO(g) + H2O(g) ==>H2(g) + CO2(g) If not, just ignore what follows. Set up an ICE chart and solve. initial: CO = 1.00 mol/L H2O = 1.00 mol/L CO2 = 0 H2 = 0 change: CO = -x H2O = -x H2 = x CO2 = x equilibrium: CO = 1-x H2O = ...
Sunday, April 11, 2010 at 6:11pm by DrBob222

chemistry
1.344 L CO2 for 0.0100 mol sample would have evolved 134.4 L CO2 for a 1.00 mole sample. 134.4/44 = 3.05 moles C/mole unknown. So the formula is C3 H something. 0.720 g H2O for 0.01 mole would have evolved 72.0 g for a 1.00 mole sample and 72.0/18 = 3.99 moles H2O or that x 2...
Monday, November 28, 2011 at 2:26pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Calculate how many moles of productwould be produced if .310 mol of the first reactant were to react completely. (a) CO2 + 4 H2 ¨ CH4 + 2 H2O CH4 _____ mol H2O _____ mol (b) C3H8 + 5 O2 ¨ 4 H2O + 3 CO2 H2O _____ mol CO2 _____ mol (c) 3 H2SO4 + 2 Fe ¨ Fe2(SO4)3 + 3 H2Fe2(SO4...
Thursday, January 6, 2011 at 6:43pm by Anonymous

Chemistry
first write the balanced chemical equation: C3H8 + 5O2 -> 3CO2 + 4H2O **note: in combustion reaction of organic compounds, the usual products are carbon dioxide and water. then calculate for molecular weight of propane (the C3H8),, Carbon is 12 while H is 1: 3*12 + 8*1 = 44...
Friday, April 1, 2011 at 7:31am by Jai

chemistry
15 mL + 35 mL = 50 mL = 50 g assuming volumes are additive and density of the solution is the same as water (1.00 g/mL). q = mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tintial). That is q/50 g. Convert to moles for J/mol or to kJ/mol.
Monday, March 28, 2011 at 12:11pm by DrBob222

chemistry
What is the theoretical yield? 1.3 moles H2S x (2 moles H2O/2 moles H2S) = 1.3 moles x (1/1) = 1.3 moles H2O produced. g H2O = moles x molar mass = 1.3 moles x 18 g/mol = about 23 estimated theoretical yield. Therefore, percent yield = (18.7/theoretical yield)*100 = ?
Sunday, December 11, 2011 at 9:02pm by DrBob222

chemistry
for (b) this is my work1250 g of H2O * 1 mol / 18 g = 69.44 mol of H2O # of moles of C2H5OH = 69.44 mol of H2O * 1 mol of C2H5OH / 3 mol of H2O = 23.15 mol of C2H5OH * 46 g / 1 mol = 1065 g of C2H5OH 1065 g of C2H5OH * 1 cm3 / 0.789 g = 1350 cm3 of C2H5OH = 1350 mL of C2H5OH...
Friday, October 10, 2008 at 11:19pm by starlight

chemistry.
Amount of moles= mass/molar mass No. of moles= 10.0g/250 g No. of moles= 0.04 moles c) CuO + H2SO4 ----> CuSO4 + H2O mol 1 1 1 1 1 mole of CuO = 1 mole of CuSO4.5H2O CuO= 64g + 16g= 80g 80 g of CuO = 250 g of CuSO4 x = 10g of CuSO4 10g x 80g/250g 800g/250 =3.2 grams of CuO
Saturday, October 24, 2009 at 6:17am by Anonymous

chemistry
You added at the beginning so you don't add twice. 2H2O ==> 2H2 + O2 You have 0.327 moles O2 and 0.654 moles H2. Convert each to grams H2O to see what you get. 0.327 x (2 moles H2O/1 mole O2) = 0.327 x 2 = 0.654 moles H2O and that x molar mass = 11.8 g H2O OR use H2. 0.654 ...
Thursday, December 8, 2011 at 10:42am by DrBob222

chemistry
Change 3.60 g CaCl2 to moles; moles = grams/molar mass (-82,800 J/mol x moles CaCl2) + [moles H2O x specific heat water(J/mol) x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Check my thinking.
Thursday, October 20, 2011 at 3:01pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
CuSO4.5H2O ==> CuSO4 + 5H2O The question is asking how much CuSO4 is left if all of the H2O is driven off. The easy way to do this is calculate % water in CuSO4.5H2O.
Sunday, February 3, 2013 at 5:28pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
*10 moles of Na2SO4 is 3*10=30 moles of particles. *Convert 0.500 kg H2O to moles. *Total moles = 30 + moles of H2O *Mole fraction of H2O = X(H2O) = (moles H2O) / Total moles. *Look up the vapor pressure of H2O at 30ºC = P(H2O) *Vapor pressure of solution = [X(H2O)]*[P(H2O)]
Saturday, September 5, 2009 at 9:38pm by GK

chemistry
what is the Molarity (M) of a 0.87m aqueous solution of ammonia, NH3? The density of the solution is 0.823 g/mL. Answer: 0.71 M So I have: 0.823 g H2O+NH3/1 ml H2O+NH3 17.034 g NH3/1 mol 18.016 g H2O/1 mol 0.87 mol NH3/1 kg H2O I've tried this several ways and I can't seem to ...
Sunday, July 10, 2011 at 6:17pm by molality--->molarity

college chem
(NH4)2CO3(s) ==> 2NH3(g) + H2O(g) + CO2(g) equilibrium: NH3 = 4.00 atm Therefore, CO2 = 2.00 atm and H2O = 2.00 atm Ptotal = 4.00 + 2.00 + 2.00 = 8.00 atm. Kp =PNH3^2*PCO2*PH2O = (4)^2*2*2 = 64 Kc = Kp(RT)-delta n = 64(0.08206*773)-4 = 3.95E-6 3. moles (NH4)2CO3 = 1.000 g/...
Tuesday, May 18, 2010 at 12:06pm by DrBob222

Chemistry-correction
*shocks it's in MOLALITY. @_@ Please disregard the above post! Molality is moles of solute per kilogram solvent. Thus we can say there are 1.33 moles of CH2O in 1000 g of H2O. To get the moles of H2O, we divide the mass (1000 grams H2O) by its molar mass. molar mass of H2O = 2...
Saturday, August 10, 2013 at 1:33am by Jai

Chemistry
2Al + 6HCl ==> 3H2 + 2AlCl3 3.612E-2g Al/molar mass Al = moles Al. Convert moles Al to moles H2 by ?mols Al x (3 moles H2/2 moles Al) = ? mols Al x (3/2) = x moles H2. PV = nRT P = 0.9666 atm - v.p. H2O @ 25C. v. p. H2O = 23.80mm/760 = xx V = ? R = 0.08206 L*atm/mol*K T = ...
Saturday, November 5, 2011 at 11:35am by DrBob222

Chemisty Check Please!
B) moles of h2o=118g/18(g/mol)=6.5556 mol moles of c12h22O11= 3.44g/342.3(g/mol)=0.10049 mol 6.5556 mol/(6.5556 mol + 0.10049 mol= 0.984902 mol A) M= (0.10049)/(0.00344 kg + 0.118 kg)= 0.82749 m c12h22O11
Tuesday, January 14, 2014 at 8:04pm by Kate

Chem 2
Need help.... calculate the theorectical yield of the compounds to be prepared in the experiment. The metal ion in both cases is the limiting reagent.Find nuber of moles of Cu(II) in the sample of CuSO4 x 5H2O that you used. The equal the number of moles of [Cu(NH3)4]x H2O ...
Monday, April 2, 2012 at 1:36am by Debbie

Chemistry 2
calculate the theorectical yield of the compounds to be prepared in the experiment. The metal ion in both cases is the limiting reagent.Find nuber of moles of Cu(II) in the sample of CuSO4 x 5H2O that you used. The equal the number of moles of [Cu(NH3)4]x H2O that could ...
Saturday, April 7, 2012 at 1:54am by Debbie

Chemistry
How much H2O could you get if you used 8.00 moles NH3 and all of the oxygen needed. That will give you 8.00 x (6 moles H2O/4 moles NH3) = about 12. Now how much H2O would be produced if you used 14.0 moles Oxygen and all of the NH3 needed. That will be 14.0 moles O2 x (6 moles...
Sunday, December 11, 2011 at 8:58pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
2H2 + O2 ==> 2H2O 10 mol hydrogen, if it has all the oxygen needed, will produce, according to the coefficients in the balanced equation, 10 moles H2O. A mole of H2O has a mass of 18 g; therefore, it should produce 180 g H2O and if water has a density of 1.00 g/mL, that ...
Thursday, October 14, 2010 at 10:45pm by DrBob222

chemistry
What I would first is to find the amount of mols of H3PO4. Since you know that 1 M means there is 1 mol of solution in every 1 liter, you can figure out the moles of the solution. The solution is 6M, so that means that to find the moles of solute in the solution you multiply ....
Thursday, February 28, 2008 at 6:09pm by Anonymous

chemistry
0.1850*0.400 = ?moles HCl 0.1525*0.500 = x moles NaOH I have 0.07625 moles NaOH and 0.07400 moles HCl; therefore, 0.07400 moles H2O should be formed. 56 kJ/mol x moles H2O formed = heat released.
Sunday, November 13, 2011 at 4:00pm by DrBob222

Chemistry- please check my work
•Find the moles of MgSO4 by dividing 95.00g by the formula mass of MgSO4. •Multiply the moles of MgSO4 by 3 ions / mole to get the moles of ions in solution. •Convert 95g of H2O to moles. •Add moles of ions to moles of H2O to get total moles. •The moles fraction of H2O is: X(...
Monday, February 23, 2009 at 9:19pm by GK

CHEMISTRY
How many moles do you need? That is M x L = moles. Then moles CuSO4.5H2O = grams CuSO4.5H2O/molar mass CuSO4.5H2O You know moles and molar mass, solve for grams.
Monday, February 20, 2012 at 11:15pm by DrBob222

Gen Chm II
Determine the pressure-based Keq for the reaction: 2SO2(g) + O2(g)<--->2SO3(g) given that 1.00×10−2 moles of SO2 and 2.00×10−2 moles of O2 were initially placed in a 2.00 L reaction chamber. The chamber contained 7.5×10−3 moles of SO3 when equilibrium ...
Monday, October 7, 2013 at 11:20pm by James

chemistry
For the balanced equation shown below, how many moles of C4H10O reacted, if 0.5599 moles of H2O are produced? C4H10O+6O2 --> 4CO2+5H2O
Thursday, December 15, 2011 at 3:19pm by SUPAMAN

chemistry
50 mg Fe x (molar mass FeSO4.7H2O/atomic mass Fe) = ?mg FeSO4.7H2O is what the final equation is. Intermediate equation is 50 mg Fe x (1 mol Fe/atomic mass Fe) x (1 mol FeSO4.7H2O/1 mol Fe) x (molar mass FeSO4.7H2O/1mol FeSO4.7H2O) = ? mg FeSO4.7H2O
Friday, January 25, 2013 at 10:34am by DrBob222

chemistry
mL x N = # milliequivalents KMnO4. # m.e. KMnO4 = # m.e. FeSO4 # m.e. FeSO4 x equivalent weight FeSO4 = g FeSO4. All of that can be put together to make one nice equation. mL x N x m.e.w. = grams. 24 x 0.250 x 0.152 = 0.0912g FeSO4.
Saturday, February 9, 2013 at 5:58pm by DrBob222

chemistry
I think the preferred way of writing CuCO3 is copper(II) carbonate and not copper(2) carbonate. Cu(s) ==>CuCO3==>CuSO4.5H2O. One mole of Cu is involved from beginning to end; therefore, moles Cu = 5.463 g/atomic mass Cu = ?? That will give you ?? moles (the same number) ...
Friday, March 26, 2010 at 6:58pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
how many moles of H2O are in 12.4g? moles H2O = 12.4/18 grams so to get CuSO4.5H2O, you need (12.4/18)*1/5 moles of CuSO4 figure how many grams that is.
Tuesday, September 21, 2010 at 8:42pm by bobpursley

Chemistry
When 6200g of ethylene glycol and 16600g terephtalic acid reacted completely to generate poly(ethyleneterephtalate)(PET),how many grams of H20 generated? My working: mol of ethylene glycol = 6200g/(62g/mol) = 100 moles mol terephtalic acid = 16600g/(166g/mol) = 100 moles So,...
Wednesday, April 25, 2012 at 9:05am by Meenaakshi

college Chemistry
The volume of air inhaled in 1 hour is (60 min/hr)(15 br./min) = 900 breaths (900 br.)(0.500L/breath) = 450 L To find moles of H2O, use the Ideal Gas Law: PV = nRT 1 atm = 760 mm Hg 47.1mmHg/760 mmHg/atm = 0.061974 atm P = 0.061974 atm for water vapor R = 0.08206 L.atm/K.mol T...
Sunday, October 19, 2008 at 8:37pm by GK

chemistry
I've had some time to think about this and I think you can make it simpler. Make a table something like this. ...g Na2CO3...mol Na2CO3...g CO2...mol CO2 ...1.00.......0.00943.......?.....0.00943 ...2.00.......0.01887.......?.....0.01887 ...3.00.......0.02830.......?.....0....
Sunday, January 22, 2012 at 2:25pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Molar Mass of KCLO3 (potassium chlorate)= 39.10+35.45+3(16.00)=122.55 First use what you are given, then use the mole to mole ratio to cancel out moles KClO3 and multiply keeping mol O2. (12.00 moles KClO3)x(3 mol O2/2 mol KClO3) =18 moles O2 :D
Tuesday, February 8, 2011 at 9:15pm by Chels

Thermochemistry
Hint: Write the balanced combustion reaction. You can find the standard enthalpies of formation for O2, CO2, and H2O from many sources, including the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. Solution: Balanced combustion reaction: C8H18 + 12.5 O2 --> 8 CO2 + 9 H2O From the ...
Sunday, December 4, 2011 at 8:58pm by Katie

Chemistry
CuSO4.5H2O + 2K2C2O4.H2O --> K2(Cu(C2O4)2).2H2O +K2SO4 + 5H2O
Friday, July 6, 2012 at 1:02pm by Steve

chemistry
I can save some time by calling CH3 R and C2H5 R'. RCOOH + HOR' ==> RCOOR' + H2O Set up an ICE chart. Initial: RCOOH = 1.0 mol from the problem. R'OH = 2.0 mol from the problem. RCOOR' = 0 you know this and H2O = 0 you know this because these are zero before the reaction ...
Thursday, May 28, 2009 at 9:45am by DrBob222

chemistry
moles H2O = 1.2E24/6.02E23 = ? Then moles H2O x 6 kJ/mol = ?
Friday, February 10, 2012 at 12:35am by DrBob222

General Chemistry I
I have the following although I don't think I've ever seen this compound and I don't know what it is. BrxOy + H2 ==> HBr + H2O mols HBr = 0.08159 mols H2O = 0.2177 There is 1 mol Br in 1 mol HBr so we mut have started with 0.08159 mol Br in BrxOy. I see only 1 mol O in H2O...
Monday, December 3, 2012 at 2:50pm by DrBob222

Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | Next>>

Search
Members