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April 17, 2014

Search: heat

Number of results: 10,167

9th grade
add the following energyies: heat to heat ice at -10 to 0 heat to melt 20 g ice at 0C Heat to heat water from 0C to 100C heat to vaporize 20gwater at 100C. heat to heat steam from 100C to 200C
Tuesday, January 5, 2010 at 6:46pm by bobpursley

Science
Organisms that maintain a constant body temperature rely on the heat produced by cells. Where does this heat come from? A) Special metabolic pathways exist just for the production of heat. B) Mitochondria produce heat in the form of ATP. C) Plants store up heat as they perform...
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 at 8:59pm by Jason

Chemistry
heat lost by hot water + heat gained by cold water = 0 heat lostt or heat gain is mass x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)
Tuesday, June 7, 2011 at 8:23am by DrBob222

Chemistry
Heat energy is the amount of heat used or available; heat capacity is the ability of a substance to absorb heat. Heat energy is measured in J or kJ and heat capacity is measured in J/g*K.
Saturday, April 21, 2012 at 3:15pm by DrBob222

Check 1 question.
Yes, you are correct. The first one is heat fusion. The second is heat of combustion. The third is heat of decomposition. The fourth is heat of solution.
Friday, June 22, 2012 at 1:39pm by DrBob222

physics
I will be happy to critique your thinking. Add the following heats: heat to melt ice heat to warm water to 100C heat to change water to steam heat to heat steam to 150C
Thursday, April 21, 2011 at 12:39am by bobpursley

Physics
How much heat is added to a 10.0 g of ice at -20.0 degrees Celsius to convert it to steam at 120.0 degrees Celsius? compute and add the following heats: heat to heat ice from -20C to 0C heat to melt ice at 0C Heat to heat water from 0 to 100C heat to convert water to steam at ...
Monday, March 5, 2007 at 7:45pm by Marie

chemistry
how much heat is required to completely vapporize 2.3 grams of ice starting at -50 degrees Celsius? (the specific heat of ice is 2.0 J/g.C; the specific heat of water is 4.184 J/g.C; the heat of fusion is 333 J/g; and the heat of vaporization is 22601 J/g)
Tuesday, March 22, 2011 at 12:04am by Anonymous

Physics
Heat lost by spoon = heat gained by water Use that heat, the aluminum temperature drop, and the specific heat of aluminum to get the mass. Ignore the styrafoam mass. It acts as an insulator to keep the heat inside, and weighs very little.
Saturday, May 7, 2011 at 12:56am by drwls

chemistry
Let the heat capacity of A = c. The heat capacity of B is 2c. Let the final temperature be T. The heat lost by B when A and Be are placed together is: (2c)(450-T) The heat gained by A is (c)(T-300). Assuming the Law of conservation of Energy holds, and there are no heat losses...
Monday, June 22, 2009 at 5:43pm by GK

Science
I'm going crazy! The heat necessary to change the state of water between a solid and a liquid is called the latent heat of vaporization, latent heat of solidification, latent heat of fusion, latent heat of liquefaction, or none of the above. I thought it was none of the above...
Friday, December 8, 2006 at 11:25am by Pat

Physics
figure this in three parts: heat to heat water from 25C to 100C heat to vaporize water at 100C heat to heat steam from 100C to 120C add them
Thursday, November 18, 2010 at 8:46pm by bobpursley

chemistry HELP
heat = (sp. heat)(grams)(temp. change) or q = (C)(m)(Tf-Ti) Heat released by Cu = Heat absorbed by H2O (C)(46.2g)(95.4C-21.8C)= (4.18J/g.C)(75.0g)(21.8C-19.6C) Solve for C to get the specific heat of copper.
Friday, January 2, 2009 at 7:52pm by GK

Science
yeh those are the two i narrowed it down to. You are very helpful though can I just ask you 1 more please. I think it's choice C, but I don't know really. Thank you! Organisms that maintain a constant body temperature rely on the heat produced by cells. Where does this heat ...
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 at 7:29pm by Jason

Physics
There may be friction in a hydraulic jack, and a bit of heat produced, but that does not make it a heat engine. A heat engine converts heat to mechanical energy. None of the things on your list do that.
Sunday, January 2, 2011 at 11:38pm by drwls

Chemistry
find the heat of commbusion, then figure the heat from the ocatane. Now, the water: heat to heat water:masswater*c*22 efficiency=heatforwater/heatfromoctane * 100 if you want it in percent.
Monday, February 4, 2013 at 6:07pm by bobpursley

Chemistry
try this heat=heat capacity * temperature change. just apply this formula heat evolve will be the heat. heat capacity is that of the calorimeter and temperature change is the unknown. use it
Monday, April 5, 2010 at 12:14pm by Aanu

chemistry
q = mass x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial) Note that you list the specific heat Fe but ask for how much heat is required to heat Al. You may have mixed two problems.
Wednesday, April 4, 2012 at 1:26pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
heat=masswater*specheatwater*(9C) Heat of solution=heat/amountof LiOH normally, one wants this on the bases of heat per mole, so convert 25g LiOH to moles
Friday, January 25, 2013 at 6:14am by bobpursley

Chemistry
when it is solid, liquid, or gas, the heat involved is m*c*deltaTemp At the transition pointss, melting, and again at boiling, there is a heat L*mass where L, the latent heat per mass, is either Lv (vaporiation heat/gram) or Lf(melting heat/gram) We will be happy to critique ...
Sunday, September 30, 2007 at 9:21am by bobpursley

Chemistry
Just for your information, the heat of fusion and the heat of solidification are the same. Just like the heat of vaporization and heat of condensation are the same. The only difference is heat fusion is melting at the melting point and heat of solidification is the solidifying...
Wednesday, February 24, 2010 at 10:49pm by DrBob222

enthalpy change
The heat required to raise the beaker temperature will be 3/4 as much the second time, becasue of the delta-T rTIO. The heat required to heat the liquid will be higher by a factor (200/250)(2.43/0.67) = 2.90 Calculate the total heat required in the second case. The ratio (heat...
Sunday, October 10, 2010 at 6:30pm by drwls

Physics
Find the heat necessary to change 2.5kg of water (ice) at -2 degrees C to steam at 105 degrees C. specific heat ice= 2060 specific heat water= 4180 specific heat steam= 2020 heat of fusion= 3.34X10^5 heat of vaporization= 2.26X10^6
Thursday, November 18, 2010 at 8:49pm by Brittany

science so confused??
heat capacity; temperature ; equal; calorimeter. Now on the first, the question is poorly worded. Heat given off is equal to the product of mass x specific heat capacity x change in temperature. Those three things define heat change. In olden days, mass x specific heat content...
Tuesday, April 22, 2008 at 1:18am by bobpursley

chemistry
heat capacity has units of J/degree C. specific heat has units of J/g*C So specific heat x grams = heat capacity. Plug in g and heat capacity and solve for specific heat. I get something like 0.2 J/g*c
Wednesday, January 20, 2010 at 10:43pm by DrBob222

AP CHEM
You have the mass of the water to be frozen, figure the heat lost to convert it to ice at -5C. You will have to watch units, on the heat of fusion, convert that to J/g. Then, the heat lost has to equal the heat gained, or Massfreon*Heatvap= heat lost
Wednesday, January 2, 2008 at 9:12pm by bobpursley

Chemistry - Heat of Fusion
When water is frozen into ice cubes in the freezer, where does the released heat go? I think it just goes into the air in the freezer, nowhere special. Because won't the heat become cold air then? That's right. The heat just adds to the heat load that the freezer/refrigerator ...
Tuesday, April 24, 2007 at 3:19pm by M and V

Chemistry
You're making it far too complicated. A + B ==> C + heat. That's an exothermic reaction since heat is emitted. Since a system in equilibrium will try to undo what we do to it, if we ADD heat, the reaction will shift so as to try to use up the added heat. If it shifts to the...
Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at 6:08pm by DrBob222

CHEMISTRY
The heat lost by the metal is the heat gained by the water heat change is mass * delta T * spec heat Let the spec heat of the metal be z. 47.5(300-40)z = 75(40-22)(4.18) z = 0.457 Looks like the metal is most likely iron.
Friday, December 16, 2011 at 9:02am by Steve

Chemistry Help Please!
How much heat is in each? q = mass x specific heat x T Calculate to see how much heat is in each. The water has MUCH more heat; therefore, the temperature drops less.
Sunday, January 23, 2011 at 12:31pm by DrBob222

Chemistry (Thermo)
Your answer to (a) looks correct. For (b), divided the heat release by the heat of fusion of water, 333 Kj per kg. For (c), divide the heat realse by (333 +418 kJ) = 551 kJ/kg For (c) add the heat of vaporization to the amount of heat required per kg, and divde that into the ...
Friday, September 10, 2010 at 10:25am by drwls

Physics
heat in = mass * heat capacity * change in temp 3.5*10^4 = 2.3* heat capacity*(T-39) I am not about to look up the heat capacity of iron in Joules/kgdegK. It is in your book
Wednesday, June 20, 2012 at 3:10pm by Damon

Chemistry
How much heat did the water lose in going from 45 to 19.5 degrees? Mass x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial). How much heat did the ice gain? mass ice x heat fusion. heat lost + heat gain = 0. The only unknown is mass ice.
Friday, April 23, 2010 at 5:57pm by DrBob222

Phase Changes
The heat of fusion of water is 335 J/g, the heat of vaporization of water is 2.26 kJ/g, the specifc heat of ice is 2.05 J/deg/g, the specific heat of steam is 2.08 J/deg/g and the specific heat of liquid water is 4.184 J/deg/g. How much heat would be needed to convert 10.73 g ...
Wednesday, May 8, 2013 at 12:41pm by Jenny

physics
Heat to do what? expand it a certain length? heat it to a certain temperature? If you are just looking at heat content for a specific temperature change, heat is directly proportional to mass, which is directly related to volume. heat then equals 1/4 of the original. But I ...
Tuesday, July 3, 2012 at 7:19am by bobpursley

Chemistry HEAT OF FUSION
#1. mass ice x deltaHfusion = ? #2. q = mass x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial) = ? #3. You can put the pieces together. heat to melt ice + heat to raise T of melt from zero C to final T + heat lost by hot water going to lower final T.
Thursday, October 6, 2011 at 8:34pm by DrBob222

chemistry 101
Some of the water gained heat. The calorimeter gained heat. Some of the water lost heat. heat gained + heat lost = 0 I would calculate heat lost by water, subtract heat gained by water. The difference is the heat gained by the calorimeter. heat gained = mass water x specific ...
Tuesday, March 9, 2010 at 11:29am by DrBob222

Science/Physics
The nerves in our skin do not sense temperature, they sense heat flow. If heat flow is great, we sense it as hot. If heat flow is outward, we sense it as cold. The seat has stored little heat, so touching it wont get much heat flow. The windshield actually has stored more heat...
Friday, December 9, 2011 at 6:18pm by bobpursley

chemistry
The heat of fusion of water is 335 J/g, the heat of vaporization of water is 2.26 kJ/g, and the specific heat of water is 4.184 J/deg/g. How many grams of ice at 0 could be converted to steam at 100 C by 9,946 Joules of heat?
Friday, November 15, 2013 at 4:31pm by Dakota

Chemistry
You have three sources of heat in and heat out. 1. heat to melt ice + 2. heat to raise T of melted ice to final T - 3. heat lost from 120g H2O #1 + #2 + #3 = 0 (mass ice x heat fusion) + [mass melted ice x specific heat melted ice (H2O) x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass water ...
Monday, September 10, 2012 at 5:15pm by DrBob222

chemistry
what ? This is from a test. I don't remember the numbers. The teacher never explained it so im trying to find a method to do it. In part A we are asked to find the change of heat. Change of heat =standard heat of formation. (H with the little circle) At this point i don't know...
Friday, August 7, 2009 at 1:23am by Jim_R

Chemistry
What quantity of heat is necessary to convert 50.0 g of ice at 0.0 C into steam 100,0 C? The heat of fusion is 80.0 cal/g, the heat of vaporization is 540 cal/g, and the specific heat of water is 1.00 cal/gC.
Tuesday, March 27, 2012 at 6:08pm by Jill

PHYSICS'S
you have three parts: a. Heat the water to 100C b. vaporize the water at 100C c. heat the steam to 110C a. heat=m*cwater*(100-20) b. heat=m*Hv c. heat=m*csteam*(110-100) cwater is specific heat capacity of water Hv is the heat of vaporization of water. Csteam is specific heat ...
Sunday, March 31, 2013 at 6:28pm by bobpursley

chemistry
the heat of fusion water is335 J/g. The heat of evaporization of water is 2.26 kJ/g, the specific heat of ice is 2.05 J/Deg/g, the specific heat of steam is 2.08 J/deg/g and the specific heat of liquid water is 4.184 J/deg/g. How much heat would be needed to convert 12.09 g of...
Tuesday, April 24, 2012 at 10:31pm by Randy

Chemistry
heat to melt ice + heat to cool water (will be negative) from 29 + heat to heat ice to final T (positive number) = 0 [mass ice x heat fusion] + [mass water x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass liquid from ice x specific heat water x (Tfinal-Tinitial) = 0 Solve ...
Tuesday, February 23, 2010 at 2:02am by DrBob222

Chemistry
heat removed from water in going from 21.0 to zero C is mass x specific heat x delta T. mass = 33.6 g specific heat is 4.184 J/g*K delta T is 21.0 - 0. heat added to ice to melt it is mass x heat fusion. mass is the unknown. heat fusion is given. Note: you need to work in the ...
Monday, February 4, 2008 at 12:52pm by DrBob222

chemistry
q = heat released by the combustion = Qcal x delta T. q/mass sample = heat/gram. If you want it in moles convert heat/gram to heat/mol. The usual way of report is kJ/mol.
Tuesday, March 22, 2011 at 9:00pm by DrBob222

univ. physics
A heat pump has a coefficient of performance of 4.5. If the heat pump absorbs 46.1 cal of heat from the cold outdoors in each cycle, what is the amount of heat expelled to the warm indoors? (in cal)
Thursday, December 13, 2012 at 5:21pm by kate

thermodynamics
If a carnot engine receives heat from a heat source and discharge 1000J to a heat sink at temperature of 27C in each cycle, calculate the heat received and the work performed by the engine in each cycle
Sunday, April 28, 2013 at 11:59pm by hiqk

Lauren
The amount of heat required to raise temperature of 55.85 g of iron 1 degrees C is called its A. Change of energy B. Enthalpy C. Molar heat capacity D. Specific heat capacity E. Specific Heat.
Friday, November 16, 2007 at 4:42pm by Chemistry

chemistry
The basic relationships above are: 1. Heat transferred = (heat capacity)(temperature change), or deltaH = C(T2-T1) ( T1, T2 = initial and final temperatures ) 2. Heat lost by B = Heat gained by A
Monday, June 22, 2009 at 5:43pm by GK

Biology
What's high specific heat is mainly a consequence of the: A) high specific heat of oxygen and hydrogen atoms B) inability of water to dissipate heat into dry air D) absorption and release of heat when hydrogen bonds break and form E) fact that water is a poor heat conductor I ...
Thursday, October 18, 2007 at 9:26pm by J

physics
A heat pump has a coefficient of performance of 4.5. If the heat pump absorbs 46.1 cal of heat from the cold outdoors in each cycle, what is the amount of heat expelled to the warm indoors? (in cal) tried everything but got nothing.
Monday, December 17, 2012 at 12:00pm by jimmy

chemistry
q = (massH2O x specific heat H2O x delta T) + (893*delta T) = ? Then ?/0.200 = heat/gram and (heat/gram) x 12 = heat/mol
Sunday, October 30, 2011 at 4:45pm by DrBob222

thermal energy
heat lost = heat gained. q = mass x specific heat x delta T.
Monday, December 19, 2011 at 12:12am by DrBob222

chemistry
How much heat is required? 1.5 g x heat vaporization = q. Now if heat is added at 24.0 J/s, how many seconds will it take?
Wednesday, January 20, 2010 at 7:04pm by DrBob222

physics
Any gas will absorb heat if you heat it up. The added heat makes the molecules move faster.
Tuesday, February 23, 2010 at 1:21am by drwls

chem
The specific heat of silver is 0.237 J/goC Its melting point is 961oC . Its heat of fusion is 11 J/g. How much heat (in J) is needed to change 17.5 g of silver from solid at 25oC to liquid at 961oC ? Add the heat required to warm the silver from room temp to the mp. Then add ...
Tuesday, October 31, 2006 at 7:59pm by mary

heat/science
how is heat lost heat flows from a hot surface to a colder surface. Heat may be lost by conduction, convection, or radiation.
Wednesday, January 3, 2007 at 8:12pm by kp

physics
heat=force*distance=30*12*.075 Joules heat=mass*specificheat*DeltaTemp now for the specific heat of skin, it is mostly water, so I would use the specific heat of water for that. Solve for delta Temp
Friday, July 19, 2013 at 7:01pm by bobpursley

Science
Assume you can heat water with perfect insulation (all the heat from combustion of ethanol is transferred to water). What is the volume of ethanol required to heat 100 mL of water by 10 degrees C? (You will need to look up density of ethanol, specific heat capacity or water, ...
Thursday, March 21, 2013 at 2:08am by Alexandra

catd
heat in = specific heat * mass * change in temp heat in = .057 * 10 *20 = 5.7 * 2 = 11.4 calories
Friday, February 4, 2011 at 2:32pm by Damon

Chemistry
For the heat absorbed by the CFC, I got 15028 J. Then for heat extracted from H2O to move from 25 C to 0 C i got 1883.09 J. And for the heat to freeze H2O, 6018.68 J was what I got. When I added the two energy values of H2O, it did not amount to the heat absorbed by CFC. And ...
Sunday, November 11, 2012 at 12:32am by Anonymous

Chemistry
Calculate the heat released when 10.0 g of water at 25.0C cools to ice at 0.0C. The specific heat of water is 1.00 cal/(g C); the heat of fusion is 80.0 cal/g; and the heat of vaporization is 540.0 cal/g.
Saturday, April 17, 2010 at 12:35am by helpanderson

Physics
a. heat= 200g*1cal/gC * 60C b. heat=power*time time= heat/power= above heat/power. Well, at this point, you have to change calories to joules, as 50watts=50joules/sec
Friday, July 2, 2010 at 6:19pm by bobpursley

Physics
The heat of fusion is 80 cal/g = 335 J/g The specific heat of ice 2.11 J/g*degC To heat the ice to 0 C requires 2000 g * 8 C *2.11 J/c*C = 33,760 J There is more than enough heat to melt all of the ice.
Tuesday, May 10, 2011 at 8:20pm by drwls

chem
heat lost by alloy + heat gained by water + heat gained by coffee cup = 0 You have three segments above. Substitute the following into the appropriate part and solve for the only unknown in the bunch which is specific heat of the alloy. Heat lost by alloy is as follows: mass ...
Friday, October 18, 2013 at 11:03pm by DrBob222

science
Do you know the specific heat of solid water (ice)? If so, then it will take q calories = mass ice x specific heat ice x (0+10) to raise T from -10 C to zero C. Subtract that from 4500 to see how much(if any) heat is left. If some heat is available, then it can go to melting ...
Tuesday, January 3, 2012 at 3:20pm by DrBob222

science
recall that heat absorbed released is given by Q = mc*(T2 - T1) where m = mass (in g) c = specific heat capacity (in J/g-k) T = temperature (in C or K) *note: Q is (+) when heat is absorbed and (-) when heat is released. substituting, Q = (480)*(0.97)*(234 - 22) Q = 98707 J = ...
Friday, October 28, 2011 at 2:30am by Jai

Chemistry
How much heat can be absorbed by the CFC? That's 289 J/g x 52.0g = ?J. How much heat must be extracted from water to move from 25 C to 0C. That will be mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (25) = ? How much to freeze H2O. Thats mass H2O x heat fusion = ? heat to freeze H2O + heat to...
Sunday, November 11, 2012 at 12:32am by DrBob222

Chemistry (Thermo)
Your answer to (a) looks correct. For (b), divided the heat release by the heat of fusion of water, 333 Kj per kg. For (c), divide the heat realse by (333 +418 kJ) = 551 kJ/kg Note:I believe drwls make a typo here. I think he meant to type 751 and not 551. :-) For (c) add the ...
Friday, September 10, 2010 at 10:25am by DrBob222

Chemistry - Heat of Fusion of Ice
Conclusion question(s) from a lab we did to find the heat of fusion of ice: Does the value obtained for the molar heat of fusion depend on the volume of water used? Does it depend on the mass of ice melted? Does it depend on the final temperature of the mixture? The heat of ...
Sunday, October 1, 2006 at 2:11pm by J.M.

chemistry
What equation will you use to calculate the heat of fusion of ice? The specific heat of water is 4.184 J/(gxC), and the heat capacity of your calorimeter is 1.0x10^1 J/C.
Tuesday, October 1, 2013 at 10:27am by Stephanie

Chemistry
I believe I worked that problem yesterday. Perhaps not for you. heat needed to move T of ice from -10 to 0 q1 = mass x specific heat ice x delta T heat needed to melt the ice. q2 = mass x heat of fusion. heat needed to move T from 0 to 25. q3 = mass x specific heat water x ...
Thursday, January 17, 2008 at 11:03pm by DrBob222

chemistry
q1 = heat absorbed by water = mass H2O x specific heat H2O x delta T. For part 2, I believe it's best to do it all in one. heat lost by Cu + heat gained by water = 0 heat lost by Cu = mass Cu x specific heat Cu x delta T. heat gained by water = done in part 1. one unknown, ...
Sunday, April 20, 2008 at 11:33am by DrBob222

college physics
Please show some effort of your own other than changing a letter in your name each time you post. (1) Look up the specific heats of glass, aluminum and water. (2) Compute the amount of heat energy gained by those three materials as they heat from 12.5 to 35 C. Call that heat Q...
Thursday, May 6, 2010 at 12:38am by drwls

Chemistry
The specfic heat of iron is 0.11cal/g C. The heat of fusion of iron, the heat required to convert iron from a solid to liquid at its melting point, is 63.7cal/g. Iron melts at 1530 C. How much heat must be added to 2g of iron at 25c to completely melt it?
Friday, March 15, 2013 at 6:24pm by Dan

Chemistry
Do this in several steps. heat to raise T ice at -14 C to zero. heat to melt ice at zero. heat to raise T from zero to 100 C. heat to vaporize water at 100. heat to raise steam from 100 to 112 C. The total is the sum of each part above. Post your work if you get stuck.
Sunday, March 29, 2009 at 4:34pm by DrBob222

science
uniform is the probably word they are looking for However, it is the temperature, not the heat, that "likes to remain" that way. Heat gets concentrated where the heat capacity is highest
Tuesday, March 24, 2009 at 3:20pm by drwls

thermodynamic
heat transfer generally means heat conduction or radiation. Thermodynamics adds to this the quantity of time, and the heat storage content of materials and matter.
Monday, June 20, 2011 at 2:12pm by bobpursley

Physics
The potential energy becomes heat, Q. Use the heat to compute the temperature rise. Delta T = Q/(M*C) = (1/2)M g H/(M*C) = (1/2)g H/C C is the water specific heat, 4180 joules/kg C
Tuesday, June 28, 2011 at 12:39am by drwls

physics
heat lost by ice=MLf =22*3.34*10^5 J =7348000 J since heat gained =heat lost 7348000 joules of heat energy is absorbed by the ice box.
Saturday, November 20, 2010 at 10:06am by sanjeet

Biology Difference b/w Heat Exhaustion/Heat Stroke
I want to know the causes of heat stroke and heat exhaustion. I cant seem to find separate causes for the two, finding very different answers online :|
Friday, February 8, 2013 at 12:53am by Shreya

Chemistry
Calculate the total quantity of heat required to convert 25.0 g of liquid CCl4(l) from 25.0C to gaseous CCl4 at 76.8C (the normal boiling point for CCl4)? The specific heat of CCl4(l) is its heat of fusion is and its heat of vaporization is
Tuesday, April 13, 2010 at 7:32pm by Bob

chemistry
heat lost by hot water is q1 = mass x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial). heat absorbed by the cold water is q2 = mass x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial). The difference of the two is the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and delta H/delta T = heat capacity of the calorimeter.
Wednesday, March 10, 2010 at 11:03pm by DrBob222

physics
find the heat needed... Heatneeded=masswater*c(0-23)-masswater*Lf+massAl*Cal*(0-23) Notice this heat is "negative), meaning it was lost. (it is negative heat gained). now, the heat the ice gained. massice*Cice*(0-Ti) Now add the heats gained...set to zero. heat ice gained+heat...
Tuesday, June 29, 2010 at 8:53pm by bobpursley

Science
I wanted to answer "Yes." But BobPursley explained it to me this way: "No air can come in/out, without an equal volume coming out/in. You are letting HEAT out. "Cold is the absence of heat. So heat goes out, and absence of heat comes in."
Friday, November 9, 2007 at 8:19pm by Ms. Sue

Physic
Usually, the temperature of the object determines this. Heat radiated is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. So temperature rises (as it absorbs heat)until temperature is such that the heat radiated is equal to the heat absorbed. Isn't there a lot of captured air ...
Wednesday, January 30, 2008 at 6:42pm by bobpursley

Physics
Heat is transferred from the two added blocks to the water and calorimeter. You can calculate that amount of heat from the increase in temperature. Set it equal to the heat lost by the two added blocks, and solve for the unknown specific heat of the second sample.
Tuesday, November 30, 2010 at 8:44am by drwls

physics
KE=1/2 massbullet* velocity^2 heat required to melt=heat required to change temp to melting poing+heat to change lead to liquid = mass*specifHeatLead*(Tm-40)+mass*HeatfusionLead look up the specifice heat of lead, the temperature of melting lead, and finally the heat of fusion...
Friday, July 19, 2013 at 7:51pm by bobpursley

chemistry
When 47.5J of heat are added to 13.2 g of liquid, its temperature rises by 1.72 degrees C. What is the heat capacity of the liquid? A cook wants to heat 1.35kg of water from 32.0 degrees C to 100 degrees C. If he uses combustion of natural gas to heat the water, hou much ...
Friday, September 21, 2012 at 3:26pm by Alyssa

chemistry
I don't know of a site. Two things you need to know. heat lost + heat gained = 0 and mass x specific heat x delta T = heat lost or gained by anything. so. heat lost by Al + heat lost by Fe + heat gained by water = 0 heat lost by Al = mass x specific heat x (Tf - Ti) where Tf ...
Tuesday, November 6, 2007 at 11:22pm by DrBob222

Physical Science
(g steam x heat vap) + (mass ice x heat fusion) + [(mass steam H2O x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass melted ice x specific heat x (Tfinal-Tinitial)]= 0 I don't know what units you ae using; you substitute them. (1g x -heat vap) + (xgrams x heat fusion) + [(1g x ...
Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 11:03pm by DrBob222

Physics
Heat engines produce mechanical or electrical energy from heat. That excludes electric motors from consideration. A steam turbine can in some cases be one PART of a heat engine, but a burner, geothermal source or nuclear reactor would have to be part of the complete heat ...
Sunday, January 2, 2011 at 10:46pm by drwls

chemistry
metal loss of heat + water gain of heat = 0 [(mass metal x specific heat metal x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute the numbers and solve for specific heat metal. Then look up in a specific heat table to identify the metal.
Monday, March 18, 2013 at 2:59pm by DrBob222

Physics
You balance the heat equation. heat gained by melting ice+heat gained by remaining ice warming up + heat gained by hot water=0 This of course means that the nonmelted ice is at a final temperature of zero, otherwise there cannot be an ice/water mxture. Heat gained by melting ...
Thursday, July 19, 2012 at 4:46pm by bobpursley

material science
How much heat (in BTU) would be required to heat and vaporize 100 lb of water from 25C to saturated steam at 1 atm? Assume heat capacity is constant at 1 BTU/lb-F and the latent heat of vaporization is 1,000 BTU/lb
Wednesday, January 19, 2011 at 8:37am by zura

Chemistry
Consider the following reaction: 2Fe2O3 --> 4Fe + 3O2 ∆Hrxn = +824.2 kJ The decomposition of 29.0 g of Fe2O3 results in a. the release of 150 kJ of heat b. the release of 12000 kJ of heat c. the absorption of 12000 kJ of heat d. the absorption of 150 kJ of heat e. ...
Saturday, September 21, 2013 at 9:07pm by Anonymous

chemistry
heat lost by metal + heat gained by H2O = 0 [mass metal x specific heat metal x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] + [mass H2O x specific heat H2O x (Tfinal-Tinitial)] = 0 Substitute and solve for specific heat metal, then look in specific heat tables and identify the metal with that specific...
Friday, March 15, 2013 at 2:56pm by DrBob222

physics
Heat loss from M grams steam cooling and condensing to 50 C liquid = heat gained by 250 g water increasing from 22 to 50 C PLUS heat gained by beacker. Write that as an equation and solve for M. You will need to know the specific heat of steam in the gas phase (about 0.4 cal/g...
Thursday, January 20, 2011 at 4:54pm by drwls

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