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April 19, 2014

Search: chem-acid base titrations

Number of results: 31,114

Chemistry
We did a lab for acid-base titrations, and I'm having trouble with my post lab questions because I had trouble with acid-base reactions and titrations in the first place! "Calculate the molar amounts of NaOH used in the reaction with the HCl solution and with the HC2H3O2. I ...
Saturday, April 21, 2007 at 4:59pm by Rachel

chem-acid-base titrations
no
Monday, April 21, 2008 at 10:06pm by Anonymous

acid and base titrations
I would average the readings of the base, then mL acid x M acid = mL base x M base. Then round to 4 significant figures.
Sunday, November 21, 2010 at 5:02am by DrBob222

chem-acid-base titrations
Assume that your vinegar contained a small amount of citric acid (a triprotic acid). Using the same experimental data, would you expect the molarity of this sample to be the same as or different than a sample which contained only pure acetic acid?
Monday, April 21, 2008 at 10:06pm by Mo

Chemistry
1. If you derive the formula for (H^+) at the (say) first equivalence point, the concn of the salt present cancels and one is left with (H^+) = sqrt(k1k2) which is 1/2(pk1 + pk2) = pH. 2. Citric acid is so highly buffered between the beginning and the final (only) practical ...
Tuesday, April 13, 2010 at 8:48pm by DrBob222

chem-acid-base titrations
Acetic acid (HC2H3O2) is an important component of vinegar. A 10.00mL sample of vinegar is titrated with .5052 M NaOH, and 16.88 mL are required to neutralize the acetic acid that is present. a.write a balanced equation for this neutralization reaction b.what is the molarity ...
Monday, April 21, 2008 at 10:06pm by natash

chemistry
mL acid x M acid = mL base x M base works for those titrations that are 1:1 in the balanced equation.
Wednesday, May 2, 2012 at 11:56pm by DrBob222

chem-acid-base titrations
Pay attention. You must have used 0.010 for L NaOH but the problem says volume NaOH is 16.88 mL.
Monday, April 21, 2008 at 10:06pm by DrBob222

chem-acid-base titrations
1/ HC2H3O2 + NaOH ==> HOH + NaC2H3O2 2. Calculate mols NaOH from L x M = ?? Convert mols NaOH to mols HC2H3O2 using the coefficients in the balanced equation. M acetic acid= mols/L. 3. Determine mols acetic acid in the 10 mL sample and from that grams acetic acid, then ...
Monday, April 21, 2008 at 10:06pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Predict whether the Ph endpoint is =7 >7, or<7 for each of the following acid-base titrations. Justify you predictions a) hydroiodic acid with sodium hydroxide. b)boric acid with sodium hydroxide c) hydrochloric acid with magnesium hydroxide d) hydrochloric acid with ...
Sunday, June 13, 2010 at 1:53pm by Adeola

chem-acid base titrations
If 20.0mL of .2019M HCI requires 39.63mL of a NaOH solution for complete neutralization, what is the concentration of the NaOH solution? how many significant figures are justified in the answer?
Monday, April 7, 2008 at 8:12pm by natash

Chemistry130
Can someone please help me with this? Are these substances acids or bases? 1. Tums- Base, right? 2. Vitamin C- Acid, right? 3. Nail Polish Remover- Base or Acid? 4. Coca Cola Pop- Acid, right? 5. Cream of Tarter- Acid, right? 6. Calamine Lotion- Base or Acid? 7. Lemon Juice- ...
Tuesday, October 13, 2009 at 12:17pm by Adam

Biochemistry
For 1 L of 0.2 M buffer, you want acid + base = 0.2 pH = pKa + log(base)/(acid) 4.40 = 4.76 + log(base/acid) base/acid = 0.436 but you should confirm that. I estimated here and there. That gives you two equations; solve them simultaneously for acid and base concnc. eqn 1 is ...
Thursday, March 3, 2011 at 5:54am by DrBob222

Chemistry
When titrating an acid with a base, a dilute solution of the base is used. When titrating a base with an acid, a dilute solution of acid is used. Why are these titrations done with dilute solutions?
Wednesday, October 6, 2010 at 2:50pm by Jeff

chem
Why are titrations using permanganate performed in acid solution?
Wednesday, April 28, 2010 at 11:07am by help

chem
Why are titrations using permanganate performed in acid solution?
Wednesday, April 28, 2010 at 11:08am by help

chem
Why are titrations using permanganate performed in acid solution?
Wednesday, April 28, 2010 at 11:08am by help

Chemistry
Since benzoic acid is an acid and quinine is a base, there is the possibility of them reacting to produce a salt. I don't have a set of tables, perhaps you do, that will give you the conjugate acid strengths. Bacid + quin ==> Bconj base + qconj acid acid + base ==> conj ...
Tuesday, March 31, 2009 at 7:29am by DrBob222

chem
Some right, some wrong. Here is the way you do it. Example, your #4. H2SO4 + CN^- <==>HSO4^- + HCN You apparently have no trouble determining which is the acid and which is the base. All of them above are correct. Your problem is knowing what is the conjugate acid/base. ...
Sunday, January 29, 2012 at 10:47pm by DrBob222

chem
Ok so i looked at it and tried to figure out the conj. base and acid. Are these right? 1) S2-(aq) + HCl(aq) <=>Cl1-(aq) + HS1-(aq) This is what I think it is: Acid = HCl Base = S^2- Conjugate acid =HS^1- Conjugate base = Cl^1- 2) H2O2(aq) + PO43-(aq) <=>HPO42-(aq...
Sunday, January 29, 2012 at 11:56pm by Erik

chem
You need to recognize what is a strong acid, strong base, weak acid, weak base, etc. moles 1 = M x L. Strong acid. moles 2 = 0 (LiCl is the salt of a strong acid/strong base so it will be neutral--howeer, the volume will count as a dilution). moles 3 = M x L. Strong base. ...
Saturday, March 7, 2009 at 11:34pm by DrBob222

chem 2
This is almost like your other buffer posts. Use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. pH = pKa + logp[(base)/(acid)] The base is the ascorbate salt and the acid is ascorbic acid. Post your work if you get stuck.
Saturday, March 3, 2012 at 1:35pm by DrBob222

chem
In the Bronsted-Lowry theory of acids, an acid will lose a proton (H+) and leave behind the conjugate base of the acid. The conjugate base of a strong acid is?
Tuesday, February 19, 2013 at 2:36am by shakira

chemistry
Use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. You will need to look up Ka for formic acid and convert to pKa. Calculate the ratio Base/acid. Then acid + base = 1 and base/acid = from above. Two equations and two unknowns. Solve for acid and base. I get something like 600 mL acid and...
Tuesday, March 2, 2010 at 1:10am by DrBob222

acid-base titrations
Think about what carbon dioxide forms when it dissolves in water.
Monday, April 21, 2008 at 11:36pm by DrBob222

chemistry
(1)acid+base=.1M potassium dibasic phosphate: 7=12.67 + log(base/acid) (base/acid)=2.138x10^-6 subst. in (1) base+base/2.138x10^-6=.1 solving base=2.13x10^-7M Mass of base=2.13x10^-7 x (174.18g)=3.71x10^-5g Now I can find the mass of the acid as well by substituting for the ...
Sunday, November 14, 2010 at 12:36am by dave

College Chemistry
Sodium hydroxide is used extensively in acid-base titrations because it is a strong inexpensive base. A sodium hydroxide solution was standardized by titrating 27 mL of 0.1628 M standard hydrochloric acid. The initial buret reading of the sodium hydroxide was 2.44 mL, and the ...
Sunday, October 3, 2010 at 3:14pm by KELLY

biochemistry
Is CAPS an acid or base? If it is an acid, what is its base? If it is a base, what is its acid? Also, is Tricine an acid or base? If it is an acid, what is its base? If it is a base, what is its acid? Thanks.
Sunday, January 27, 2008 at 11:44pm by stew

chem-acid-base titrations
ok for part 2 moles of NaOH=L*M .01*.5052=.005052 moles of NaOH then moles of NaOH =moles of HC2H3O2 since 1-1 ratio from equation that makes .005052 moles of HC2H3O2 correct? then M acetic acid=.005052 moles/.01688L which =2.9*10^-1 is that correct? and for part 3 is it mols ...
Monday, April 21, 2008 at 10:06pm by natash

acid-base titrations
Ohhh, so which one would be lower, higher, or unaffected. Can you pleaseeeeeeeeeeeeee explain
Monday, April 21, 2008 at 10:22pm by natash

acid and base titrations
You want to use a titrant that is close to that of the sample being titrated so I would choose a.
Sunday, November 21, 2010 at 5:15am by DrBob222

Organic Chem
I think it would be a base because like you said it has no space to accept any electrons. As, for the other compounds is this correct: O2- is a lewis base Cu2+ is a lewis base AlCl3 is an acid SO3 is an acid ????
Friday, October 15, 2010 at 8:18pm by Adam

chem
Use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. pH = pKa + log [(base)/(acid)] The base will be NH3. The acid is NH4Cl.
Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 4:32pm by DrBob222

chem
I do these by reasoning. The equations I write are not right but the answers are right. KClO4 + HOH ==> HClO4 + KOH HClO4 is a strong acid. KOH is a strong base Therefore, the solution of the salt is neutral. If the acid is strong and base is weak the solution of the salt ...
Wednesday, February 1, 2012 at 12:04am by DrBob222

acid and base titrations
what is the pH of a solution prepared by adding 0.50 mol KOH to 1.0 L of 0.30 M HNO3?
Sunday, November 21, 2010 at 6:24pm by jj reddick

chem
or acid- base? because i did gas evolution oxidation-reduction precipitation single-displacement but got it wrong so I am thinking either one of those has to be taken out and/or acid-base added
Tuesday, November 30, 2010 at 5:06pm by hannah

chem
Ok so for question I have to state whether the element/compound is an acid, base, conjugate acid or conjugate base. Can u please tell me if i am correct and help me out with the ones i am unsure what the answer is? 1)S^2-(aq)+HCl(aq)<=>Cl^1-(aq)+HS^1-(aq) This is what I ...
Sunday, January 29, 2012 at 10:47pm by Erik

chemistry
Do strong acid strong base titrations have a buffer region?
Thursday, May 12, 2011 at 11:32pm by jam

Chemistry130
1. Tums- Base, right? 2. Vitamin C- Acid, right? 3. Nail Polish Remover- Base or Acid?I looked up the MSDS for acetone and it is listed as 7 which would be neutral. 4. Coca Cola Pop- Acid, right? 5. Cream of Tarter- Acid, right? 6. Calamine Lotion- Base or Acid?This is a ...
Tuesday, October 13, 2009 at 12:17pm by rBob222

Chemistry
my ap chem teacher has been absent for the past two weeks and part of the notes her sub gave us to copy says that In the equation HC2H3O2 + H20 <--> C2H3O2(- charge) + H3O(+ charge) HC2H3O2 is an acid H2O is a base C2H3O2(- charge) is the conjugate base and H3O(+ charge...
Saturday, May 15, 2010 at 3:51pm by Mark

Organic chem
Classify each as a lewis acid or lewis base... A)H20 B)O2- C)Cu2+ D)SO3 E)AlCl3 Lewis acids are electron pair acceptors. Lewis bases are electron pair donors. Look at H2O, for example. .. H:O: .. H This molecule has no "holes" to accept an electron. Would you expect this to be...
Friday, October 15, 2010 at 9:41pm by Adam

Chem
water is the base(H+ acceptor) and C2H4O2 is the acid(H+ donor) so Hydronium is the conjugate acid and C2H3O2 is the Conjugate base.
Tuesday, September 6, 2011 at 11:42pm by ALISON

Chemistry
Use the Bronsted-Lowry definitions to identify the two conjugate acid-base pairs in the following acid-base reaction: HCO3^- + S^2- <-> HS^- + CO3^2- I got it. HCO3^- is the base in the pair with CO3^2-. S^2- is the acid in the pair with HS^-. Would you believe you have ...
Saturday, May 26, 2007 at 6:42pm by Raj

chem -please help!!!!!!!!!!!!
The Henderson-Hasselbalch equation is pH = pKa + log(B/A) pH = 2 pKa = 2 2 = 2 + log(B/A) so B/A = 1 or base = acid So RCOOH ==> RCOO^- + H^+ RCOO^- is base. RCOOH is acid. If base = acid it must be 50% dissociated.
Monday, September 10, 2012 at 11:12pm by DrBob222

chemistry
You know acid + base = 1.0M You know pH = pKa + log base/acid so plug in pH and pKa and you will obtain the ratio of base/acid. The two equations solved simultaneously will give you the M (then mols) of the acid and base. See if you can take it from there.
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 at 8:28pm by DrBob222

chem
How do I calculate ratio of volume of base to volume of acid . Ex) phenolphthalein: Acid:20mL Base 30mL
Tuesday, April 27, 2010 at 2:22am by lou

Chem
I think you've missed the boat with regard to conjugate acids/bases. I think students make this much harder than it is. Here is the simple scoop. From whatever you have, if you want the BASE you take away a H. If you want the ACID you add a H. HSO4. The conjugate base is SO4^2...
Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at 11:26pm by DrBob222

CHEM 1412 general
Have you studied the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation? That is used for solutions that are buffed solutions. pH = pKa + log(base)/(acid) NaClO is the base; HClO is the acid.
Monday, April 30, 2012 at 10:51pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
You have two buffer solutions 1) weak acid and its conjugate base 2)weak base and its conjugate acid. Write explicitly ( considering generic formula for acid and base) the equations of neutralization when you: a) add strong acid and strong base 1) b) add strong acid or strong ...
Friday, March 29, 2013 at 2:45pm by Grace

chem
Yes, its a buffered solution. Use the H-H equation when you have a buffer. That's always a weak acid and its salt (conjugate base) or a weak base and its salt (conjugate acid). In this case you have a weak acid and sodium acetate which is the salt. NH3 and NH4Cl would be an ...
Friday, March 6, 2009 at 9:53pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
It's done with moles. You have acid acid for the acid so I don't know which acid you are using. mols base = M x L = 0.1 x 0.002 L = xx mols acid = M x L = 0.1 x 0.008 L = yy There will be xx mols salt formd. There will be xx mols acid - yy mols base = excess acid unreacted. ...
Monday, April 14, 2008 at 2:35am by DrBob222

chem buffer
A buffer is a solution of a. a weak acid and its base (salt). b. a weak base and its acid(salt). Acetic acid/sodium acetate NH3 and NH4Cl
Friday, October 29, 2010 at 3:16pm by DrBob222

chem lab (webwork)
Complete the table below: How much 0.10 M Base (in mL) is required to neutralize 8.00 mL of the 0.10 M acid? Base Acid Base Volume (mL) NaOH HCl NaOH HC2H3O2
Tuesday, April 13, 2010 at 7:19pm by need help student

chem lab (webwork)
How much 0.10 M Base (in mL) is required to neutralize 8.00 mL of the 0.10 M acid? Base Acid Base Volume (mL) NaOH HCl NaOH HC2H3O2
Tuesday, April 13, 2010 at 7:20pm by anonymous

Chemistry
I don't believe formic acid has a pK3. You must mean pKa. a. pH = pKa + log (base)/(acid) Since base = acid then base/acid = 1; log 1 is zero and pH = pKa. b. Use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation above and substitute for base and acid then calculate pH.
Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at 1:50pm by DrBob222

chemistry please check
for the following reactions label each species as an acid or a base. Indicate the species that are conjugate acids and conjugate bases. A. HSO4-(acid) + NH3(base)<--> SO4^2-(conj base) + NH4+ (conj acid) B. HPO4^2- (conj base)+ NH4+ (conj acid) <--> H2PO4-(acid) + ...
Sunday, April 25, 2010 at 10:36pm by Anna

A.P. Chemistry
pH = pKa + log [(base)/(acid)] You know Ka. Calculate pKa. NO2^- is the base. HNO2 is the acid. First, plug in pH = 3.00, the pH of the solution you want, and calculate the (base)/(acid) ratio. That gives you (base) = factor x (acid). Then you know mLbase*Mbase = mLacid*Macid ...
Saturday, April 3, 2010 at 5:05pm by DrBob222

acid and base titrations
in a titration, 0.0400 mol of solid NaOH is required to neutralize 10.0 mL of H2SO4(aq). From these data, the [H2SO4] is:
Friday, November 19, 2010 at 8:09pm by jj reddick

Science
I need help describing the difference between Arrhenius acid/base, Bronsted/Lowry acid/base, and Lewis acid/base. Everything online is too complicated! Thanks!
Tuesday, December 18, 2007 at 9:02pm by Janissa

Chemistry Logic
How can I tell a conjugate base from a regular base and a conjugate acid from a regular acid? For example, in: H2O + HONH3 (reversible arrows) HONH2 + H3O+ What is the acid, base, conjugate base, conjugate acid? Is there no base and conjugate base since HONH3 is an acid? The ...
Friday, August 3, 2007 at 7:13pm by Taasha

chem lab (webwork)
Subtract HAc moles - NaOH moles. The difference = moles HAc (acetic acid) remaining. Amount NaOH added = moles Ac^-(acetate ion) produced. pH = pKa + log ([base)/(acid)] where base is the acetate and acid is the acetic acid.
Thursday, April 15, 2010 at 11:05pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
The salt contains the conjugate base or acid of the corresponding acid or base on the list. Since most buffers are combinations of a weak acid and its conjugate base, or a weak base and its conjugate acid, the combination of the salt and the related acid or base make a buffer ...
Tuesday, June 24, 2008 at 3:25pm by GK

Chem
write the dissociation of acetic acid identifying the base,acid,H donor, and H receiver C2H4O2+H2O - H3O+C2H3O2 is hydronium the H donor and is C2H3O2 the base?
Tuesday, September 6, 2011 at 11:42pm by Justin

chem
One of the reaction types you memorize. acid + base = salt + water. base (FeO) + acid(HClO4) = salt [Fe(ClO4)] + water (H2O).
Monday, October 29, 2012 at 10:19am by DrBob222

Chemistry
If an equal number of moles of the weak acid HOCN and the strong base KOH are added to water, the resulting solution will be acidic, basic or neutral? There is a complicated answer and a sensible answer. Both arrive at the same answer. But here is the logic for the sensible--I...
Friday, April 27, 2007 at 2:58pm by Joel

chemistry
Hi there, ok, my question stated "Use information from acid/base table and the value of Kw t ocalulate the base ionization constant, Kb, of the following bases: a)hypochlorite ion b) nitrite ion c) benzoate ion I looked at my acid/base table but it only gives values for ...
Tuesday, April 8, 2008 at 8:15pm by Jay

chemistry
Correct on 1. Correct on 2. Correct on 3. To be a buffer, the solution must be a weak acid and its salt (conjugate base) OR a weak base and its salt (conjugate acid). Thus, adding a strong base, such as NaOH, to a weak acid, such as acetic acid, forms sodium acetate and you ...
Monday, November 8, 2010 at 1:48am by DrBob222

Chemisty
In titrations of acids and bases, what is the difference between the end point of the titration, and the equivalance point? Also, what is chemically occuring during the buffer zone? Thanks! Good question and one that students sometimes have trouble with. The equivalence point ...
Tuesday, May 15, 2007 at 9:47pm by Jessie

Chemistry
You want the pH of the buffer to be 7.5; therefore, calculate the ratio of base to acid using the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. pH = 7.2 + log(base/acid). Solve for B/A. I get something like 2. You have two unknowns; you need another equation. That is acid + base = 0.05 ...
Sunday, September 19, 2010 at 1:58pm by DrBob222

TO DrBob222 or any science helper
HCH3COO is acetic acid--acid NaCL is sodium chloride--salt H2CO3 is carbonic acid --acid C6H8)7 I can't interpret Mg(OH) is magnesium hydroxide--base NaOH is sodium hydroxide--base KBr is potassium bromide--salt Sr(OH)2 is strontium hydroxide--base HNO3 is nitric acid--acid
Wednesday, March 12, 2014 at 9:58pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
According to the Bronsted-Lowry acid/base theory, an acid is a proton donor. A base is a proton acceptor. I'm going to write acetic acid like this CH3COOH (that's the same HC2H3O2 you have). The H on the right side is the acidic H; the others are not. So in CH3COOH + H2O ==>...
Saturday, May 15, 2010 at 3:51pm by DrBob222

chemistry
You want b/a ratio to be 4.90 = pKa + log(b/a) I used 4.74 for pKa and came up with b/a = 0.16 approximately or base = 0.16*acid base + acid = 0.2 Solve the two equation simultaneously to obtain acid = ?? base = ?? Then you can answer 1). That will be M/2 = moles and moles/...
Monday, September 5, 2011 at 11:58am by DrBob222

chemistry
Use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. pH = pKa + log [(base)/(acid)] Substitute pH and pKa and calculate the ratio of base/acid. The second equation you need is base + acid = 0.1 M Those two equations solved simultaneously will give you concn acid and concn base, from there ...
Sunday, November 14, 2010 at 12:36am by DrBob222

analytical chem
A word to the wise. Do NOT (that's NOT) think 0.1 m HOAc is the same as 0.1 M HOAc. 0.1 m is 0.1 MOLAL while 0.1 M is 0.1 MOLAR. They are NOT the same. Use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. pH = pKa + log [(base)/(acid)] base = NaOAc; acid = HOAc.
Thursday, December 6, 2012 at 2:26pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
So if two titrations were completed were completed: 1) the titration of HCl with Na(OH) 2)the titration of HCl with Ba(OH)2 (the concentrations of acid and base for both titrations are the same) I know what the titration curve of the first one looks like, but compared to the ...
Tuesday, March 6, 2012 at 8:46pm by Niki

acid-base titrations
b won't make a difference. One more of those listed won't make a difference. The others will. The problem asks you, not if they will be affected, but if the results will be high or low.
Monday, April 21, 2008 at 10:22pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
The following questions relate to acid base reactions. a) What type of reaction is said to occur when an acid reacts with a base.? b) What are the general products of such a reaction? i.e. An acid + a base produces . + .
Wednesday, November 7, 2012 at 9:37pm by Many

Organic Chemistry
First you add units. Is that 0.200 M or some other unit? Second, you must know if this is a 1:1 reaction or not. If M and if 1:1 acid/ base ratios, then mL acid x M acid = mL base x M base.
Monday, April 30, 2012 at 11:16pm by DrBob222

chem help
You need to produce a buffer solution that has a pH of 5.08. You already have a solution that contains 10 mmol (millimoles) of acetic acid. How many millimoles of acetate (the conjugate base of acetic acid) will you need to add to this solution? The of acetic acid is 4.74.
Saturday, February 28, 2009 at 11:05pm by chem

chemistry
It's easy. Really nothing to it. Acids have another H. Bases have fewer H.The problem tells you what is printed is an acid. Take away a H to get the base. SO, NH4^+ is the acid; NH3 is the base. H2O is the acid; OH^- is the base. c.
Monday, April 8, 2013 at 10:02pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and the total buffer (both equations) and solve simultaneously. 7.45 = 7.21 + log (base/acid) I get base/acid = estimated 1.8 but you need to do it more accurately. And base + acid = 1M Solve simultaneously. I obtained approximately 0.36M...
Monday, March 31, 2014 at 1:45am by DrBob222

For Dr.Bob222 (chem work)
Almost. 0.15 mol/L * 0.12 L = 0.018 mol acetic acid OK 0.2 mol/L * 0.03 L = 0.006 mol NaOH OK 0.018 - 0.006 = 0.012 mol of acetic acid in excess very good pH = pKa + log (acid/base) The next step is where you went wrong. 0.006 is the number of mol of base (acetate ion) formed...
Monday, August 27, 2007 at 11:17pm by DrBob222

Chemistry (Titration Curves)
Which of the following Acid+Base titration combinations would have a buffering region in their plot? 1)Strong Acid+Strong base (HCl+NaOH) 2)Weak acid and strong base (Acetic+NaOH) 3)Strong Acid and weak base (HCl+NH3) 4)Weak Acid and weak base (Acetic+NH3) In all cases, there ...
Sunday, May 8, 2011 at 12:44am by Anonymous

chem
pH = pKa + log (base)/(acid) 5.30 = 4.699 + log(b/a) b/a = 3.99 for one equation. Second equation is mLbase x 0.5M = mLacid x 0.5M The 0.5M divides out. Substitute base 3.99*acid in the above and mLbase =3.99(300-mLbase) solve for mL base and subtract from 300 to obtain mL ...
Tuesday, April 26, 2011 at 2:16am by DrBob222

Chemistry
Determine whether each of the following salts will form a solution that is acidic, basic, or pH-neutral? Al(ClO4)3-Acid LiCl-Neutral KClO2-BAse C6H5NH3NO2-Acid CH3NH3Br-Acid KCl-Neutral NaClO-Base NH4ClO-Acid Fe(ClO4)3-Acid C2H5NH3NO3-Acid Is this right?
Saturday, October 23, 2010 at 2:19pm by Anonymous

Chemistry
Determine whether each of the following salts will form a solution that is acidic, basic, or pH-neutral? Al(ClO4)3-Acid LiCl-Neutral KClO2-BAse C6H5NH3NO2-Acid CH3NH3Br-Acid KCl-Neutral NaClO-Base NH4ClO-Acid Fe(ClO4)3-Acid C2H5NH3NO3-Acid Is this right?
Saturday, October 23, 2010 at 4:15pm by Anonymous

Chemistry
You have two unknowns so you need two equations. pH = pK2 + log(base)/(acid) Substitute the number and solve for base/acid for one equation. The second is base + acid = 0.1M Post your work if you get stuck.
Friday, February 22, 2013 at 4:01pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
I don't know how to reply to an answer. First of all thank you! For the question I just asked about the titration curves. Would that mean that titrating with barium hydroxide would take half the volume that is used when titrating with sodium hydroxide? Oh and there was a ...
Tuesday, March 6, 2012 at 9:41pm by Niki

Chem
Use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. pH = pKa + log[(base)/(acid)] You know pKa for NH3 (you have Kb listed but pKa = 14-pKb), you know pH, and you know (base). Calculate (acid), which is the NH4Cl, and go from concn to moles to grams. Post your work if get stuck.
Saturday, April 18, 2009 at 6:19pm by DrBob222

chemistry
If the acid base reaction HA(aq)+B^-(aq)---> HB(aq)+A^-(aq) <--- has a k = 10^-4,which of the following statements are true & why? (a)HB is a stronger acid than HA (b)HA is a stronger acid than HB (c)HA & HB have same acidity (d)B^- is a stronger base than A^- (e)A^- is ...
Friday, January 1, 2010 at 5:16am by chikirshu

chem
I think the answer is c. The RCOOH group (an acid) reacts with NaHCO3 (a base) to form the sodium salt of the acid (+ CO2 and H2O). (
Wednesday, December 3, 2008 at 11:18am by DrBob222

chemistry 2
The problem asks for RELATIVE concentrations. So 0.21 = log (base/acid) (base/acid) = 1.62 (base( = 1.62*(acid)
Sunday, July 28, 2013 at 2:00pm by DrBob222

Chem
Cl^- is a base, yes. HCl is a strong acid because it ionizes 100%. We often omit the water from strong and weak acid ionizations; technically we should include water in those reactions. If you write the equation as HCl + H2O ==> H3O^+ + Cl^- Then HCl is an acid and Cl^- is ...
Wednesday, March 2, 2011 at 12:28pm by DrBob222

chemistry
In a Bronsted-Lowry acid-base reaction with a high Keq value, Acid + Base = Weaker acid + Weaker Base Acid1 + Base1 = Base2 + Acisd2 Acid1 is stronger than Acid2, and, Base1 is stronger than Base2 In your question, the equilibrium constant is small. The forward (left to right...
Friday, January 1, 2010 at 5:16am by GK

Chem 2
Do you know what buffer capacity is? It's defined as the mols of strong acid or strong base that can be added to 1 L of a buffer solution and without changing the pH more than +/- 1. The buffer capacity depends mostly upon two things. 1. The concn of base and acid components. ...
Sunday, March 4, 2012 at 11:05pm by DrBob222

Chem
pH = pKa + log(base)/(acid) You have Kb, convert that to pKb, then to pKa by pKa + pKb = pKw = 14. (CH3NH3B) is the acid. pH = 10.0 (base) = 0.49M Solve for (CH3NH3Br)
Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at 9:59pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Take acetic acid and add NaOH to it. That produces sodium acetate, the base of the acid/base system. To make this work, one needs to use acetic acid and add NaOH but not enough to completely neutralize it. For example, if you took 10 moles acetic acid and added 5 moles NaOH, ...
Tuesday, February 14, 2012 at 5:46pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Two of the answers are right. It is gas evolution (CO2 is produced) AND it is an acid/base neutralization. My best guess is that you are to pick gas evolution as the answer. Acid/base neutralization depends upon which definition you are using for acid and base. HCl is an acid ...
Friday, November 20, 2009 at 4:39pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
a. pH = pKa + log(base)/(acid) pH = 3.75 + log(x)/(x) (the problem just says base = acid so I've called that x. pH = 3.75 + log(1) pH = 3.75 + 0 pH = 3.75 b. HCOOH = formic acid = acid = 1.0M HCOONa = sodium formate = base = 10M pH = 3.75 + log (10)/(1) Solve for pH You should...
Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at 1:50pm by DrBob222

Biochem
I could have used your numbers if you had given pKa and ratio base/acid you used. As it is you must check what I have; it may not agree with the constants you used. pH = pKa + log (base)/(acid) 4.44 = 4.75 + log (base)/(acid) I obtained b/a = 0.49 or (base) = 0.49(acid) Then a...
Tuesday, September 24, 2013 at 4:26pm by DrBob222

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