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Physics: Astronauts and space
When out in space in International Space Station (ISS), Astronauts experience weightlessness. The ISS’s orbit is 354 km (that is 3.54 x 105 m) above the surface of the earth.The distance separating the center of the earth from the center of the ISS is then approximately equal ...
Monday, April 19, 2010 at 11:48pm by HELP ME!!

physics
Two Astronauts A and B are working in the space shuttle in the space.Suddenly the hammer falls from the hands of astranaut in space. who will hear most sound,Astranonaut A or B .and why?
Tuesday, March 15, 2011 at 4:32am by christina

physics
Two astronauts, each having a mass of 89.0 kg, are connected by a 10.0 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway between them at a speed of 5.60 m/s. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate each of the following.
Sunday, July 15, 2012 at 5:34pm by Anonymous

Sience
video clips from the International Space Station, the astronauts are seen floating around as if there is no force of gravity holding them to the floor. The truth is that the space station is orbiting Earth at a height of only about 175 kilometers above the surface. While this ...
Friday, August 20, 2010 at 2:38pm by Anonymous

science
When astronauts travel into space, they can still see Earth and the moon. why is this possible? A. The sun shines in the windows of their space vehicle. B. They view earth and moon through a telescope. C. The sun's light reflects off earth and the moon. D. The astronauts look ...
Saturday, March 27, 2010 at 5:48pm by Anonymous

Physics
Two astronauts, each having a mass of 61.9 kg, are connected by a 14.7 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, orbiting their center of mass at speeds of 5.57 m/s. Calculate the magnitude of the initial angular momentum of the system by treating the astronauts ...
Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at 10:47pm by Celeste

Physics
Astronauts who spend long periods in outer space could be adversely affected by weightlessness. One way to simulate gravity is to shape the spaceship like a cylindrical shell that rotates, with the astronauts walking on the inside surface. Explain how this simulates gravity. ...
Sunday, November 1, 2009 at 4:38pm by Sasha

physics
Two astronauts, each having a mass of 78.5 kg, are connected by a 10.0-m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway between them at a speed of 5.50 m/s. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate each of the following...
Saturday, December 1, 2012 at 8:47pm by heather

physics concept
An astronaut who is floating freely through space is seated upon a unicycle. He begins to pedal the unicycle “forward.” As he does so,what would the astronauts' motion be in space? Would he rotate in the opposite direction of the spinning wheel?
Sunday, April 22, 2012 at 10:05pm by Hannah

Physics (very long question)
Two astronauts (Fig. P8.68), each having a mass of 84.0 kg, are connected by a 10.0 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway betwen them at a speed of 5.80 m/s. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate each of the...
Thursday, November 18, 2010 at 9:00am by Anonymous

physics-rotational dynamics
Two astronauts, each having a mass of 75.0 kg, are connected by a 10.0 m rope of negligible mass. THey are isolated in space,orbiting their center of mass at speeds of 5.00 m/s. calculate A)magnitude of the angular momentum of the system by treating astronauts as particles and...
Monday, February 12, 2007 at 4:22pm by cyndi

physics
Explain how an object can orbit a planet & why astronauts float around in the orbiting space shuttle
Thursday, June 7, 2012 at 3:48am by deresse

Physics
Engineers are trying to create artificial "gravity" in a ringshaped space station by spinning it like a centrifuge. The ring is 170 m in radius. How quickly must the space station turn in order to give the astronauts inside it apparent weights equal to their real weights at ...
Friday, February 11, 2011 at 1:03pm by M

physics
Engineers are trying to create artificial "gravity" in a ringshaped space station by spinning it like a centrifuge. The ring is 120 m in radius. How quickly must the space station turn in order to give the astronauts inside it apparent weights equal to their real weights at ...
Tuesday, March 15, 2011 at 3:18pm by olga

Physics
Engineers are trying to create artificial "gravity" in a ring-shaped space station by spinning it like a centrifuge. The ring is 100m in radius. How quickly must the space station turn in order to give the astronauts inside it weights equal to their weights at the earth's ...
Sunday, November 27, 2011 at 2:35pm by Hayli

Physics
Engineers are trying to create artificial "gravity" in a ring-shaped space station by spinning it like a centrifuge. The ring is 100m in radius. How quickly must the space station turn in order to give the astronauts inside it weights equal to their weights at the earth's ...
Sunday, November 27, 2011 at 6:59pm by Hayli

space car
design a car for astronauts to drve in outer space
Wednesday, January 26, 2011 at 6:19pm by alex

physics
Suppose that three astronauts outside a spaceship decide to play catch. All the astronauts weigh the same on Earth and are equally strong. The first astronaut throws the second astronaut toward the third one and the game begins. Describe the motion of the astronauts as the ...
Tuesday, August 17, 2010 at 12:23pm by Anonymous

Physics
Two astronauts, each having a mass M are connected by a length of rope of length d have a negligible mass. They are isolated in space, orbiting their center of mass at an angular speed of ù0. By pulling on the rope, one of the astronauts shortens the total distance between ...
Wednesday, November 14, 2012 at 7:01pm by Alphonse

Physics
Suppose the surface (radius = r) of the space station in the figure is rotating at 38.6 m/s. What must be the value of r for the astronauts to weigh one-half of their earth-weight?
Wednesday, November 7, 2012 at 11:00pm by Don

Physics
A space station is shaped like a ring and rotates to simulate gravity. If the radius of the space station is 120 m, at what frequency must it rotate so that it simulates Earth's gravity? [Hint: The apparent weight of the astronauts must be the same as their weight on Earth.]
Saturday, March 6, 2010 at 2:37am by Max

Physics
Suppose the surface (radius = r) of the space station in the figure is rotating at 38.6 m/s. What must be the value of r for the astronauts to weigh one-half of their earth-weight?
Wednesday, November 7, 2012 at 2:13pm by Anonymous

Physics
Suppose the surface (radius = r) of the space station in the figure is rotating at 38.6 m/s. What must be the value of r for the astronauts to weigh one-half of their earth-weight?
Thursday, November 8, 2012 at 3:18am by Donald

physics
As their booster rockets separate, Space Shuttle astronauts typically feel accelerations up to 3g, where g = 9.80 m/s2. In their training, astronauts ride in a device where they experience such an acceleration as a centripetal acceleration. Specifically, the astronaut is ...
Thursday, February 17, 2011 at 12:30pm by kia

science
Atmospheric pressure decreases as one leaves the surface of the earth. The atmospheric pressure is lower on Pike's Peak than at sea level because of the elevation of Pike's Peak. Astronauts need space suits and oxygen when in space in order to live because there is no ...
Monday, January 26, 2009 at 9:21pm by DrBob222

physics
A couple of astronauts agree to rendezvous in space after hours. Their plan is to let gravity bring them together. She has a mass of 66.0 kg and he a mass of 72.0 kg, and they start from rest 25.0 m apart. 1)Find his initial acceleration. 2)Find her initial acceleration. 3)If ...
Wednesday, February 15, 2012 at 3:09pm by HH

physics
Our muscles atrophy when there is no gravitational force. On long space flights this is a problem, which is why astronauts exercise. On very long space flights it might be advisable to simulate gravity. Your space ship is a long cylinder of radius 100 m that spins about its ...
Monday, July 29, 2013 at 5:37am by Steven

AP physics
suppose that the surface (radius=r) of the space station is rotating at 35.8 m/s. what must be the value of r for the astronauts to weigh one-half their earth weight?
Friday, October 29, 2010 at 9:22am by Leah- PLEASE HELP!!! :)

Physics
When out in space in International Space Station (ISS), Astronauts experience weightlessness. The ISS’s orbit is 354 km (that is 3.54 x 105 m) above the surface of the earth. The distance separating the center of the earth from the center of the ISS is then approximately equal...
Thursday, September 8, 2011 at 8:57am by Elisabeth

statistics
space shuttle astronauts each consume an average of 3000 calories per day. one meal normally consists of a main dish, a vegetable dish, and 2 different desserts. the astronauts can choose from 11 man dishes, 8 vegetable dishes, and 12 desserts. how many different meals are ...
Wednesday, November 9, 2011 at 4:23pm by kerri

physics
An orbiting spacecraft is described not as a "zero-g" but rather as a "microgravity" environment for its occupants and for onboard experiments. Astronauts experience slight lurches due to the motions of equipment and other astronauts and due to venting of materials from the ...
Friday, August 10, 2012 at 2:52pm by Ben

physics
A space station is shaped like a ring and rotates to simulate gravity. If the radius of the space station is 150 m, at what frequency must it rotate so that it simulates Earth's gravity? [Hint: The apparent weight of the astronauts must be the same as their weight on Earth.] ...
Saturday, March 13, 2010 at 11:34pm by jade

physics
during space flight, astronauts often refer to forces as multiples of the force of gravity on earth's surface. what does a force of 5g mean to an astronaut?
Saturday, January 16, 2010 at 4:48pm by kendra

Science
How do astronauts fix things in a space station?
Friday, August 14, 2009 at 1:42am by Jessica

Science HELLLP!!
How do astronauts fix parts in space?
Friday, August 14, 2009 at 2:13am by Jessica

earth
how would eath's gravity effect you in space??? At what altitude does the Earth's gravity no longer have an effect on the astronauts or the space shuttle???
Monday, April 19, 2010 at 4:35pm by kelle

Science
The weight is same but their is less gravity in space so the astronauts would float.
Monday, March 28, 2011 at 8:13pm by Sona S.

science
the astronauts can live for long periods of time in a space station? my answers is yes.
Friday, February 28, 2014 at 7:53am by Anonymous

english part 1
Which of the following best expresses the writer's main idea in “Single Room, Earth View”? A. Space exploration leads to human progress. B. Space travel offers a unique view of Earth. C. Astronauts are highly trained scientists. D. Pollution is endangering Earth.
Thursday, February 13, 2014 at 7:20pm by Wahab

physics
Are they both inside the shuttle, where there is an atmosphere? Is one of them outside "in space"? Dropping a hammer will not make it fall, in either case. You have not adequately defined the locations of the two astronauts. Sound cannot be heard in space. If a hammer hits the...
Tuesday, March 15, 2011 at 4:32am by drwls

PHYSICS HELP
A couple of astronauts agree to rendezvous in space after hours. Their plan is to let gravity bring them together. She has a mass of 66.0 kg and he a mass of 72.0 kg, and they start from rest 25.0 m apart. A)Find his initial acceleration. i put 7.68* 10^-12 m/s^2 B)Find her ...
Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 2:58pm by Gina

phy
As their booster rockets separate, Space Shuttle astronauts typically feel accelerations up to 3g, where g = 9.80 m/s2. In their training, astronauts ride in a device where they experience such an acceleration as a centripetal acceleration. Specifically, the astronaut is ...
Thursday, February 17, 2011 at 10:26pm by kia

science
an astronaut on a space walk bumps the shuttle and starts moving away at a velocity of 0.02m/s. The astronauts mass is 100kg. He has takesa 1kr "safety week" and shoves it away in exactly the direction of his motion at a speed of 6m/s. what speed does the astronaut move back ...
Wednesday, September 25, 2013 at 3:23pm by trisha

science
An astronaut on a space walk bumps the shuttle and starts moving away at a velocity of 0.02m/s. The astronauts mass is 100kg. He has takes a 1kg "safety week" and shoves it away in exactly the direction of his motion at a speed of 6m/s. What speed does the astronaut move back ...
Thursday, September 26, 2013 at 11:58am by Trisha

Science
An astronaut on a space walk bumps the shuttle and starts moving away at a velocity of 0.02m/s. The astronauts mass is 100kg. He has takes a 1kg "safety week" and shoves it away in exactly the direction of his motion at a speed of 6m/s. What speed does the astronaut move back ...
Tuesday, October 1, 2013 at 6:26pm by Please help me.

Exploring Space
Why do astronauts appear to float when they aboard the ISS station and experience 90% of earth's gravitational pull? Is it because of the freefall?
Monday, March 15, 2010 at 7:41pm by Sara

physics
You have probably seen films of astronauts floating weightless in orbiting satellites. People often get the idea that the astronauts are weightless because they are so far from the gravity of the earth. Let us see if that explanation is correct. Typically, such satellites ...
Monday, November 8, 2010 at 5:11pm by steph

Physics
You have probably seen films of astronauts floating weightless in orbiting satellites. People often get the idea that the astronauts are weightless because they are so far from the gravity of the earth. Let us see if that explanation is correct. Typically, such satellites ...
Wednesday, November 10, 2010 at 11:33pm by Carmen

Physics
You are explaining why astronauts feel weightless while orbiting in the space shuttle. Your friends respond that they thought gravity was just a lot weaker up there. Convince them and yourself that it isn't so by calculating the acceleration of gravity 562 km above the Earth's...
Sunday, October 4, 2009 at 8:58pm by Jen

Physics
Two astronauts, one of mass 61 kg and the other 82 kg, are initially at rest in outer space. They then push each other apart. How far apart are they when the lighter astronaut has moved 12 m?
Saturday, November 21, 2009 at 4:30pm by Anonymous

Physics
Two astronauts, one of mass 61 kg and the other 82 kg, are initially at rest in outer space. They then push each other apart. How far apart are they when the lighter astronaut has moved 12 m?
Sunday, November 22, 2009 at 4:08pm by Anonymous

physics
Astronauts in space cannot weigh themselves by standing on a bathroom scale. Instead, they determine their mass by oscillating on a large spring. Supppose an astronaut attaches one end of a large spring to her belt and the other end to a hook on the wall of the space capsule. ...
Monday, March 31, 2014 at 8:26pm by Hannah

physics
You are explaining to friends why astronauts feel weightless orbiting in the space shuttle, and they respond that they thought gravity was just a lot weaker up there. Convince them and yourself that it isn't so by calculating how much weaker gravity is at h = 330 km above the ...
Monday, October 12, 2009 at 9:37pm by Elizabeth

physics
You are explaining to friends why astronauts feel weightless orbiting in the space shuttle, and they respond that they thought gravity was just a lot weaker up there. Convince them and yourself that it isn't so by calculating how much weaker gravity is at h = 330 km above the ...
Monday, October 12, 2009 at 9:37pm by Elizabeth

Exploring Space
Sort of, the astronauts and the ISS station are both falling (accelerating) toward Earth equal to the gravitational acceleration at the orbit height.
Monday, March 15, 2010 at 7:41pm by bobpursley

Physics
When out in space in International Space Station (ISS), Astronauts experience weightlessness. The ISS’s orbit is 354 km (that is 3.54 x 105 m) above the surface of the earth (You can get more educational NASA resources from: The distance separating the center of the earth from...
Thursday, September 8, 2011 at 7:34pm by Ronda

Science
Compare an astronauts weight in orbit with the astronauts weight on Earth, assuming the mass of the astronaut doesn't change.
Monday, March 28, 2011 at 7:15pm by Janice

Science
Compare an astronauts weight in orbit with the astronauts weight on Earth, assuming the mass of the astronaut doesn't change.
Monday, March 28, 2011 at 8:13pm by Janice

PHYSICS HEELLPPP!!
Many people mistakenly believe that the astronauts who orbit the Earth are "above gravity." Calculate g for space shuttle territory, 225 kilometers above the Earth's surface (dashed line in sketch). Earth's mass is 6 1024 kg, and its radius is 6.38 106 m (6380 km).
Monday, February 20, 2012 at 3:26pm by JARED

physics
Two astronaut, as shown in the figure, each having a mass of 62.0 kg, are connected by a 12.00 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway between them at a speed of 5.00 m/s. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate...
Sunday, November 11, 2012 at 5:50pm by Anonymous

physics
Two astronaut, as shown in the figure, each having a mass of 62.0 kg, are connected by a 12.00 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway between them at a speed of 5.00 m/s. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate...
Sunday, November 11, 2012 at 7:43pm by Anonymous

physics
Two astronaut, as shown in the figure, each having a mass of 62.0 kg, are connected by a 12.00 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway between them at a speed of 5.00 m/s. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate...
Sunday, November 11, 2012 at 7:48pm by Anonymous

Physics
Many people mistakenly believe that the astronauts who orbit the Earth are "above gravity." Calculate g for space shuttle territory, 290 kilometers above the Earth's surface (dashed line in sketch). Earth's mass is 6 1024 kg, and its radius is 6.38 106 m (6380 km). 1.)in m/s^2...
Saturday, October 5, 2013 at 1:19am by Alfonso

science
The distance that a ball can be thrown upwards is V^2/(2g). V^2 will presumably be the same on Mars, although a heavy and bulky space suit and the lighter weight of the person's arm would change V somewhat. Muscles of astronauts also tend to deteriorate the longer they stay in...
Monday, October 18, 2010 at 5:23am by drwls

Physics
You are explaining why astronauts feel weightless while orbiting in the space shuttle. Your friends respond that they thought gravity was just a lot weaker up there. Convince them and yourself that it isn't so by calculating the acceleration of gravity 248 km above the Earth's...
Sunday, July 8, 2012 at 7:39pm by Dan

physics
At a time when mining asteroids has become feasible, astronauts have connected a line between their 3740-kg space tug and a 6500-kg asteroid. They pull on the asteroid with a force of 470 N. Initially the tug and the asteroid are at rest, 480 m apart. How much time does it ...
Tuesday, March 1, 2011 at 1:46pm by lizz

english
is it astronauts supposed to rest for eight hours but to excited to rest before leaving spaceship, astronauts took three hours to put on space equipment tv camera turned on so world could watch opened spaeship door 61/2 hours after landing armstrong got out first astrounauts ...
Sunday, August 5, 2012 at 8:43am by Taylor

physics HELPP!!!!!!!
Two astronaut, as shown in the figure, each having a mass of 88.0 kg, are connected by a 10.00 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway between them at a speed of 6.00 m/s. By pulling on the rope, the astronauts shorten...
Wednesday, November 14, 2012 at 4:44pm by anon

Physics
If astronauts could travel at v=0.89c, we on Earth would say it takes (4.20/0.890)=4.72 years to reach Alpha Centauri, 4.20 light years away. The astronaut would disagree. (a) How much time passes on the astronaut's clocks? (b) What is the distance to Alpha Centauri according ...
Wednesday, May 2, 2012 at 8:33pm by LUMBA

Physics Number 3 (Online w/ no teacher)
Many people mistakenly believe that the astronauts that orbit the Earth are “above gravity.” Calculate g for space-shuttle territory, 200 kilometers above the Earth’s surface. Earths’ mass is 6 X 10 to the 24th and its radius is 6.38 X 10 to the 6th (6380 km). Your answer is ...
Monday, October 27, 2008 at 8:52am by Katie

physics
In designing rotating space stations to provide for artificial-gravity environments, one of the constraints that must be considered is motion sickness. Studies have shown that the negative effects of motion sickness begin to appear when the rotational motion is faster than ...
Sunday, December 19, 2010 at 10:35pm by jessica

physics
In designing rotating space stations to provide for artificial-gravity environments, one of the constraints that must be considered is motion sickness. Studies have shown that the negative effects of motion sickness begin to appear when the rotational motion is faster than ...
Wednesday, November 7, 2012 at 2:17pm by Anonymous

College Physics
In designing rotating space stations to provide for artificial-gravity environments, one of the constraints that must be considered is motion sickness. Studies have shown that the negative effects of motion sickness begin to appear when the rotational motion is faster than ...
Saturday, October 2, 2010 at 2:09pm by Dawn

physics
At a time when mining asteroids has become feasible, astronauts have connected a line between their 3640 kg space tug and a 6500 kg asteroid. Using their ship's engine, they pull on the asteroid with a force of 490 N. Initially the tug and the asteroid are at rest, 500 m apart...
Monday, November 1, 2010 at 8:05pm by phillip

Physics
Outside the International Sapce Station, a 60 kg astronaut holding a 4.0 kg object (both initially at rest) throws the object at 10 m/s relative to the space station. A 50 kg astronaut, initially at rest, catches the object. What is the speed of the separation of the two ...
Thursday, June 18, 2009 at 1:59am by Rio

Astronomy 1010
The International Space Station orbits approximately 350 km above the Earth's surface. (The Earth's radius is 6,378 km.) Are the astronauts beyond the pull of Earth's gravity? Explain your reasoning.
Tuesday, January 17, 2012 at 8:25pm by Frank

Astronomy 1010
The International Space Station orbits approximately 350 km above the Earth's surface. (The Earth's radius is 6,378 km.) Are the astronauts beyond the pull of Earth's gravity? Explain your reasoning.
Tuesday, January 17, 2012 at 9:19pm by Frank

Physics
At a time when mining asteroids has become feasible, astronauts have connected a line between their 3400 kg space tug and a 6000 kg asteroid. Using their ship's engine, they pull on the asteroid with a force of 490 N. Initially the tug and the asteroid are at rest, 420 m apart...
Tuesday, September 2, 2008 at 10:06pm by Lisa

Physics
At a time when mining asteroids has become feasible, astronauts have connected a line between their 3760-kg space tug and a 6100-kg asteroid. Using their ship's engine, they pull on the asteroid with a force of 490 N. Initially the tug and the asteroid are at rest, 490 m apart...
Sunday, October 3, 2010 at 4:10pm by Xavier

Physics
At a time when mining asteroids has become feasible, astronauts have connected a line between their 3760-kg space tug and a 6100-kg asteroid. Using their ship's engine, they pull on the asteroid with a force of 490 N. Initially the tug and the asteroid are at rest, 490 m apart...
Sunday, October 3, 2010 at 6:36pm by Xavier

Physics
A 160 kg astronaut (including space suit) acquires a speed of 2.20 m/s by pushing off with his legs from an 1950 kg space capsule. What is the change in speed of the space capsule? As the reference frame, use the position of the space capsule before the push. If the push lasts...
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 at 12:19pm by Nikohl

Physics
A 160 kg astronaut (including space suit) acquires a speed of 2.20 m/s by pushing off with his legs from an 1950 kg space capsule. What is the change in speed of the space capsule? As the reference frame, use the position of the space capsule before the push. If the push lasts...
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 at 1:18pm by Nikohl

Physics
A 120 kg astronaut (including space suit) acquires a speed of 3.00 m/s by pushing off with his legs from an 1900 kg space capsule. What is the change in speed of the space capsule? As the reference frame, use the position of the space capsule before the push. if the push lasts...
Wednesday, November 17, 2010 at 12:05am by Linda

english
please organize these into a paragraph ;astronaauts supposed to rest for eight hours, but too excited to rest ;astronauts easily hopped high because moon has less gravity than earth ;opened spaceship door 61/2 hours after landing ;brought back to earth some moon rocks and soil...
Sunday, August 5, 2012 at 8:43am by Taylor

PLEASE HELP-PHYSICS HW
A 130 kg astronaut (including space suit) acquires a speed of 2.80 m/s by pushing off with his legs from an 2000 kg space capsule. What is the change in speed of the space capsule? As the reference frame, use the position of the space capsule before the push. If the push lasts...
Sunday, November 20, 2011 at 7:04pm by m

Science and acrostic poems
HI! I'm making an acrostic poem about Apollo Eleven for my science class. I need help making one, so can someone give me a word for some of the letters?....(mostly the E's) A (astronauts) P O (outer space) L L (landing) O E L E V E N
Tuesday, May 27, 2008 at 5:57pm by Steve

Chem
An air purifiction system involving litium hydroxide, LiOH, was used. LiOH absorbs carbon dioxide. 2LiOH(s) + CO2(g) <---> Li2CO3(s) + H2O(l) Use Le Chatelier's principle to explain why the amount of time astronauts can spend in a space-craft is limited?
Saturday, July 25, 2009 at 6:25pm by Lena

physical science
What a funny question. How can there be air friction where there is no air? What happens to astronauts who leave space station for extravehicular activity? Do they have to remain tied to the ship to avoid falling to earth or "escaping to outer space"? To change an object's ...
Saturday, December 17, 2011 at 1:10am by drwls

physcis
Two astronaut, as shown in the figure, each having a mass of 62.0 kg, are connected by a 12.00 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway between them at a speed of 5.00 m/s. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate...
Monday, November 12, 2012 at 3:43pm by Anonymous

Physics
How do you calculate the earth's gravitational pull on astronauts?
Thursday, January 19, 2012 at 12:18pm by Harmon

Physics (please help)
An astronaut is performing a space walk outside the International Space Station. The total mass of astronaut with her space suit and all lher gear is 127 kg. A small leak develps in her pulsion system and 5.84 g of gas are ejected each second into space with a speed of 754 m/s...
Thursday, March 3, 2011 at 1:26pm by Abigail

Physics (please help!!!!)
An astronaut is performing a space walk outside the International Space Station. The total mass of astronaut with her space suit and all lher gear is 127 kg. A small leak develps in her pulsion system and 5.84 g of gas are ejected each second into space with a speed of 754 m/s...
Thursday, March 3, 2011 at 7:01pm by Abigail

LAL
(E)Essential and (NON)nonessential clauses check if these are right. do any sentence need commas? thx 1. the explorers whom i most admire are astronauts. (E) 2. one man who made space travel possible was Robert.(E) 3.goddard who tested many rockets helped develop liquid fuel...
Thursday, May 6, 2010 at 4:53pm by Sara!

English
I forgot to include the following sentences. Thank you vy much for your help. 1) The station orbits earth 16 times a day so he saw a sunrise evey 90 minutes. He also carried out some important experiments and took a lot of photos. 2) Actually, he lost his camera in space when ...
Wednesday, April 13, 2011 at 5:32pm by Mike1

Calculus / a bit of physics
explain why a scalar equation of the line exists in 2-D space, but not in 3-D space.
Thursday, May 17, 2012 at 9:19am by j

space
What is the difference between your questions 1 and 2? Everyone on Earth orbits the sun. If a person leaves Earth and heads for the moon, he or she is still orbiting the sun. The astronauts of Apollo 10 were the first to reach the moon, but the Earth's gravity pulled them back...
Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 8:39am by drwls

Physics
A 170 kg astronaut (including space suit) acquires a speed of 2.75 m/s by pushing off with his legs from a 2400 kg space capsule. What is the average change in speed in meters/second of the space capsule?
Friday, July 12, 2013 at 10:17pm by Ryan

science
The pull of gravity keeps the Moon in orbit around Earth. The distance between the Earth and Moon is about 380,000 kilometers. A crew of astronauts leaves Earth on a Monday and lands on the Moon on a Thursday. They land on the side of the Moon facing away from the Earth. On ...
Thursday, February 2, 2012 at 6:05pm by Bryan

Movie physics
Almost any space movie has the roar of engines from other spacecraft in space. Since an atmosphere is required to transmit sound waves, this defies a law of physics. I hope this helps a little more. Thanks for asking.
Sunday, December 16, 2007 at 5:22pm by PsyDAG

math
how many different tetrahedrons are determined by ______ given no four are coplanar? 4 points in space 9 points in space 15 points in space n points in space
Thursday, November 17, 2011 at 7:35am by Cody

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