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April 17, 2014

Search: Maths - Geometric Progression

Number of results: 12,791

Math (Geometric Progression)
5 distinct positive reals form an arithmetic progression. The 1st, 2nd and 5th term form a geometric progression. If the product of these 5 numbers is 124 4/9, what is the product of the 3 terms of the geometric progression? Note: The phrase "form an arithmetic progression" ...
Saturday, June 22, 2013 at 3:08am by Shin

Maths - Geometric Progression
Find the value of x for which the numbers x+1, x+3, x+7, are in geometric progression.
Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 1:36am by Anonymous

Math
5 distinct positive reals form an arithmetic progression. The 1st, 2nd and 5th term form a geometric progression. If the product of these 5 numbers is 124 4/9, what is the product of the 3 terms of the geometric progression? Note: The phase "form an arithmetic progression" ...
Saturday, May 11, 2013 at 3:56am by Shin

Maths
1..The first 2 terms of a geometric progression are the same as the first two terms of an arithmetic progression.The first term is 12 and is greater than the second term.The sum of the first 3 terms od the arithmetic progression is 4/3 less than the sum of the first 3 terms of...
Sunday, February 3, 2013 at 4:35pm by Lucas

Geometric progression
The second term of a geometric progression is 12 more than the first term given that the common the ratio is half of the first term. Find the third term of the Geometric progression
Sunday, October 23, 2011 at 1:06pm by Anonymous

math
1) If the number 1,1/3,1/9, are terms of Geometric progression. Find its common ratio 2) If the second term of Geometric progression is equal to 3, and the 5th term is equal to 81/8. Find the 7th term. 3)If x,y,3 is a Geometric progression. Find the value of x and y 4) Insert ...
Saturday, March 12, 2011 at 1:52pm by bogoss

math
1)Find the sum of the first eight terms of the Geometric progression 256,128,64,32 2)How many terms should be taken from the Geometric progression 4,12,36 for the sum to be 2188
Saturday, March 19, 2011 at 2:18pm by la bellgoss

maths
how arithmetic and geometric progression can be used to solve problems related to banking business?
Wednesday, December 15, 2010 at 1:17pm by kulwa

economics
please i wish to know the relationship between arithmetic progression and geometric progression as related to business studies
Tuesday, November 9, 2010 at 12:53pm by Anonymous

maths
Find two geometric progression having: 2 as second term and 1458 as eight term,
Saturday, June 15, 2013 at 7:28am by Shane

GP Caluculus
The third term of a geometric progression is 16. The sum of the third term and the fouth term is 8. Find (a)the first term and the common ration of the progression (b)the sum of infinity of the progression
Thursday, December 1, 2011 at 8:37am by Watermelon

GP Caluculus
The third term of a geometric progression is 16. The sum of the third term and the fouth term is 8. Find (a)the first term and the common ration of the progression (b)the sum of infinity of the progression
Thursday, December 1, 2011 at 9:10am by Watermelon

GP Caluculus
The third term of a geometric progression is 16. The sum of the third term and the fourth term is 8.Find (a)the first term and the common ratio of the progression. (b)the sum of infinity of the progression.
Thursday, December 1, 2011 at 11:22am by Watermelon

Maths - Geometric Progression
If in a GP, then (x+3)/(x+1) = (x+7)/(x+3) x^2 + 6x + 9 = x^2 + 8x + 7 -2x = -2 x=1 check: numbers would be 2 , 4, 8 which are in GP with a common ratio of 2
Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 1:36am by Reiny

Geometric Sequence
The product of the first five terms of a geometric progression is 32. If the fourth term is 17, compute the second term.
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 at 7:37am by Will

Pre-Calculus-check answers
1) I agree 2) Your answer is OK, but these are not geometric means. They are three numbers in a geometric progression. Another possible answer would be -2, -2 sqrt2, -4.
Saturday, September 13, 2008 at 4:12pm by drwls

Maths - Geometric Progression
The second term of a GP is 1/2 and the sum ti infinity of the series is 4. Find the first term and and the common ratio of the series.
Tuesday, September 25, 2012 at 10:30am by Anonymous

Maths - Geometric Progression
ar = 1/2 a/(1-r) = 4 a = 2-√2 r = 1/4 (2+√2) or a = 2+√2 r = 14 (2-√2)
Tuesday, September 25, 2012 at 10:30am by Steve

Maths
A geometric progression has a third term of 20 band sum to infinity which is three times the first term. find the first term.
Saturday, September 10, 2011 at 5:25pm by Tejiri

math
There are two positive numbers that can be inserted between 3 and 9 such that the first three are in geometric progression while the last three are in arithmetic progression. Find the sum of those two numbers.
Monday, February 14, 2011 at 3:06pm by Sidney

Geometric Progression
Integers a, b, c, d and e satisfy 50<a<b<c<d<e<500, and a,b,c,d,e form a geometric sequence. What is the sum of all possible distinct values of a?
Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 1:38am by Mathslover

math
If the sum of the first and the second terms of an infinite Geometric progression is equal to 3/8, and the sum of its term is equal to 1/2. find the common ratio of the first term of the progression
Friday, November 5, 2010 at 1:24pm by Ali

Math Algebra
The first term of a geometric progression is more than the third term by 12. The fourth term is more than the second term by 4. Find: i.the first term a and the common ratio r. ii. the n'th term of the progression.
Monday, September 2, 2013 at 6:03am by Leda

maths
"the first three terms form an arithmetric progression" so.... 2y+2 - (x+4y) = x - (2y+2) which gives x = 2 "the last three tern form a geometric sequence" so ... x/(2y+2) = (y-1)/x , but we know x = 2 2/(2y+2) = (y-1)/2 I get y = √3
Sunday, February 21, 2010 at 8:04am by Reiny

Geometric progression
Solution.Tn=ar'n-1 where n=3
Sunday, October 23, 2011 at 1:06pm by Charles

math
in a Geometric progression the sum of the first and the second terms is 90 and the sum of the second and the fourth terms is equal to 30.find the sum of the first 8th term in the progression
Friday, November 5, 2010 at 1:17pm by Ali

Series (Pre-Cal)
Let me ask you the same question: If the distance to a wall is 1 meter, and in each step you go 1/9 th the way remaining. If you do this an infinite number of times, how far will you have traveled? 1/9+ 8/9 * 1/9 + 1/9*(8/9)^2+ ... 1/9(1+ (8/9)^2 + (8/9)^3 + ..) or 1/9 the sum...
Saturday, March 21, 2009 at 9:08pm by bobpursley

maths
In the sequence: x+4y ; 2y+2 ;x ;y-1, (consisting of 4 terms) the first three terms form an arithmetric progression, while the last three tern form a geometric sequence. Calculate the values of x and y. Answer(s) can be left in surd form.
Sunday, February 21, 2010 at 8:04am by Anonymous

Algebra/Number Theory
In a sequence of four positive numbers, the first three are in geometric progression and the last three are in arithmetic progression. The first number is 12 and the last number is 452. The sum of the two middle numbers can be written as ab where a and b are coprime positive ...
Tuesday, July 23, 2013 at 1:29pm by John Berkhamp

Geometric progression
Solve 2x-y=10 and 3x+y2=22
Wednesday, October 12, 2011 at 4:52pm by Olosun

math
find the sum of the first 8th term of the Geometric progression, 1,3,9,27
Friday, November 5, 2010 at 1:11pm by Ali

math sequenc
the nth term of the geometric progression is 3(2^n-1). how many terms are less than 200?
Tuesday, January 8, 2013 at 10:23pm by HELP HELP MNHS

intro cal
the first 3 term of a geometric progression are k-4, 2k-4, 4k+4. what is the value of k? can someone help please! in any geometric progression any term divided by its previous term gives you the common ratio, so .... (2k-4)/(k-4) = (4k+4)/(2k-4) cross-multiply and proceed. I ...
Friday, May 18, 2007 at 7:46am by Emma

AP Calculus
The 9th term of an arithmetic progression is 4+5p and the sum of the four terms of the progression is 7p-10, where p is a constant. Given that common difference of the progression is 5, find the value of p.
Wednesday, November 30, 2011 at 11:25pm by Watermelon

maths
The "bite rate" seems to be decreasing in your example. Fist one vampire bites two people (2 each) Then two bite 4 (2 each) Then 4 bite 6 (1.5 each) Then 6 bite 8 (1.33 each) If this trend continues, 8 bite 10, (1.25 each) on the fifth night. What do the vampires do who are ...
Monday, August 8, 2011 at 5:45am by drwls

math
In Geometric progression the sum of first of three terms is 28 and the product is 512 find those numbers
Wednesday, March 16, 2011 at 8:58am by Dhanalakshmi

maths
Is this an arithmetic progression (AP) or geometric progression (GP)? AP's have constant differences, while GP's have constant ratios. Given series: 7, 11, 15, 19, 23 differences: 11-7=4, 15-11=4, 19-15=4, 23-19=4 (constant difference d=4, therefore AP) ratios: 11/7, 15/11, 19...
Sunday, June 5, 2011 at 5:17pm by MathMate

maths
the sum of the 4th and 6th terms of an A.P is 42. the sum of the 3rd and 9th terms of the progression is 52. find the first term, the common difference and the sum of the first ten terms of the progression.
Wednesday, March 7, 2012 at 3:46am by festus

11
This is a geometric progression a1=30 r=.6 What is 30(.6)^10 ?
Monday, March 18, 2013 at 6:22pm by bobpursley

Math
The product of three numbers in geometric progression is 1, their sum is -2/3. Find the numbers.
Saturday, November 2, 2013 at 11:51am by Adigun

trig
if sina,cosa,tana are in geometric progression then prove that cot^6a-cot^2a=1
Sunday, March 20, 2011 at 11:40am by Anonymous

Math
Sn= a1 (1 - r^n/ 1 - r) applies when the series is a geometric progression, such as 20 ∑ a1*r^i i=1
Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 8:40pm by MathMate

Math
Given a geometric progression: 0.05, 0.2, 0.8, ... Find the sum from the 5th term to the 8th term?
Friday, January 18, 2013 at 2:49am by azmeerahim

math
The numbers 27;x;y are in geometric progression if the sum of these numbers is 21 calculate the possible value of x and y
Saturday, March 12, 2011 at 1:52pm by Anonymous

math
The amounts of oil pumped from an oil well in each of the years 2001 to 2004 formed a geometric progression with common ratio 0.9. The amount pumped in 2001 was 100000 barrels. Calculate in which year the amount pumped will fall below 5000. The amounts of oil pumped from an ...
Saturday, May 12, 2007 at 8:26am by Rashida

mathematics trignometry
if sina, cosa, tana are in geometric progression then prove that cot^6a-cot^2a=1
Sunday, March 20, 2011 at 11:49am by Anonymous

Maths
Eric thinks of 2 sequences.One is geometric and the other arithmetic.Both sequences start with the number 3.The common ratio of the geometric sequence is the same as the common difference of the arithmetic sequence.If the 6-th term of the geometric sequence is 96.Find the ...
Sunday, February 3, 2013 at 4:27pm by Lucas

math
1) The sum of n numbers in Geometric progression is: Sn=a1*[(1-q^n)/(1-q)] Where: a1 is first number in progresion q is the common ratio. In your case: a1=32 q=2 Sn=S8=32*[(1-2^8)/81-2] S8=32*[(1-256)/(1-2)] S8=32*( -255)/( -1) S8=32*255 S8=8160 2) I am not shure that this ...
Saturday, March 19, 2011 at 2:18pm by Anonymous

math
The n th term (Un) of a progression geometric is given by the formula 2(1.1)^n. Find the least value of n such that Un ≥ n
Monday, April 11, 2011 at 8:55am by jack

math
The product of the first five terms of a geometric progression is 32. If the fourth term is 17, compute the second term.
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 at 7:36am by Will

Math
Find the sum to 5 terms of the geometric progression whose first term is 54 and fourth term is 2.
Saturday, June 15, 2013 at 10:32pm by Fadhlur Rahmah

Math
A sequence is called an arithmetic progression of the rst order if the di erences of the successive terms are constant. It is called an arith- metic progression of the second order if the di erences of the successive terms form an arithmetic progression of the rst order. In ...
Friday, May 11, 2012 at 6:47am by Bhupendra

Math Algebra
Omg im really sorry. There seems to be an error. The "fifth" term of a geometric progression is more than the third term by 12.
Monday, September 2, 2013 at 6:03am by Leda

math
with clear illustrations and examples explain how arithmetic and geometric progression can be used to solve problems related to a)construction of business b)banking business c)production/operation function
Saturday, December 11, 2010 at 6:29am by shadrack

calculus
which number should be subtracted from each of the three numbers 5, 15, and 50 so that the resulting three numbers form a geometric progression?
Saturday, June 15, 2013 at 1:45am by nomee

mathematics
given tha geometric progression x,y,15.find the value of x,find the value of y ?
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 at 9:04am by michael

algebra
Okay, I was taught that if a geometric series is infinite and it diverges then it has no limit and no sum. Looking back in my notes, I found an example of finding the value for a divergent series? Is this possible? The sum of an infinite geometric progression is infinite when ...
Thursday, May 31, 2007 at 5:21pm by Jane E.

Maths
Consider all 3-term geometric sequences with first term 1 and with common ratio the square of an integer between 1 and 1000. How many of these 1000 geometric sequences have the property that the sum of the 3 terms is prime?
Monday, April 29, 2013 at 4:13am by ianian

AP calculus
The consecutive terms of an arithmetic progression are 5-x, 8, 2x. Find the common difference of the progression.
Saturday, December 3, 2011 at 10:23pm by Watermelon

Math
Consider all 3-term geometric sequences with first term 1 and with common ratio the square of an integer between 1 and 1000 (inclusive). How many of these 1000 geometric sequences have the property that the sum of the 3 terms is prime?
Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at 11:21pm by Maths lover Please Help...

AP calculus
Given an arithmetic progression -7,-3,1,..., state three consecutive terms in this progression which sum up to 75.
Thursday, November 24, 2011 at 3:48am by Watermelon

AP calculus
Given an arithmetic progression -7,-3,1,..., state three consecutive terms in this progression which sum up to 75.
Thursday, November 24, 2011 at 7:04am by Watermelon

maths
1) The first term of arithmetic progression is -20 and the sum of it's term is 250. find it's last term if the number of it's terms is 10 2) Find the fifth term from the arithmetic progression -12, -9, -6 hence find the sum of it's first fifty terms. 3) The sum of the first ...
Sunday, September 25, 2011 at 7:34am by Amir khan

maths-Arithmetic progression
you will recall that n ∑ k^2 = n(n+1)(2n+1)/6 k=1 it's pretty obvious then what the average is
Thursday, December 27, 2012 at 11:26am by Steve

maths-Arithmetic progression
Prove that mean of squares of first n natural numbers is (n+1)(2n+1)/6
Thursday, December 27, 2012 at 11:26am by Anonymous

Algebra
3 real numbers that form a geometric progression have sum equal to 175 and product equal to 17576. What is the sum of the largest and smallest numbers?
Monday, March 18, 2013 at 7:24pm by John

Algebra
3 real numbers that form a geometric progression have sum equal to 175 and product equal to 17576. What is the sum of the largest and smallest numbers?
Monday, March 18, 2013 at 7:35pm by Joe

algebra
Determine whether each sequence is arithmetic or geometric. Find the next three terms. 4, 8, 16, 32, . . . A.arithmetic, 64, 128, 256 B.geometric, 64, 128, 256 C.geometric, 48, 64, 80 .DThe sequence is neither geometric nor arithmetic. I think it's B...? 81, 27, 9, 3...
Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 10:41am by Cassie

Geometric Progression
10000 = 2000(1 - 1.1^-n)/.1 5 = (1 - 1.1^-n)/.1 .5 = 1 - 1.1^-n 1.1^-n = .5 log both sides -n log 1.1 = log .5 -n = log .5/log 1.1 = -7.27 n = 7.27 or appr 7 and 1/4 years
Tuesday, September 25, 2012 at 10:07am by Reiny

math
T(1)=16 T(2)=12 T(3)=9 ... T(n)=16(3/4)^(n-1) It is a geometric progression (GP) with a ratio of 3/4. The sum to n terms of a GP is: S(n)=16(1-(3/4)^n)/(1-(3/4)) Substitute n=17 in the above formula to get S(17), the total downward distance.
Thursday, May 26, 2011 at 7:02pm by MathMate

Government high school
Is this a geometric progression? Exactly what does Government high school have to do with it?
Thursday, January 27, 2011 at 4:18pm by bobpursley

math
the first term of an arthmetic progression is 1 and its last term is 28, find the sum of the progression if their number is 10
Monday, November 1, 2010 at 5:28pm by sonia

Math
The sum of the first nth term of a geometric progression is 127 and the sum of their reciprocal is 127/64. The first term is 1. Find n and the common ratio.
Saturday, November 2, 2013 at 11:58am by Adigun

Math
Which represents the type of sequence: 12, 22, 30, 36, 41, ? neither arithmetic nor geometric both arithmetic and geometric arithmetic geometric
Saturday, March 10, 2012 at 1:11am by Brett

arithmetic
Two arithmetic progression have thd same first and last terms.the first arithmetic progression has 21 terms with a common difference of 9.How many terms has the other arithmetic progression if its common difference is 4?working and answer.thans
Thursday, October 14, 2010 at 4:49pm by William

math
apply arithmetic progression formula !If you don't know then search arithmetic progression on GOOGLE!
Thursday, October 3, 2013 at 9:46pm by help()!!!!!

Maths
Find 8 terms of the arithmetic progression if the second term is 2 and the sixth term is 5
Monday, March 5, 2012 at 11:25pm by Great

maths
calculate the 16th term of an arithmatic progression he its fifth term is 6 and its 12th is 41.
Monday, April 9, 2012 at 1:46pm by mafika

Maths
The first term of an arithmetic sequence is 2. The first, third and eleventh terms are the first three terms of a geometric sequence. Determine the seventh term of the geometric sequence
Thursday, March 1, 2012 at 4:58pm by Anonymous

arithmetic
first term and larst term of a geometric progression is 42.if the forth term is greater than the second term by 168, find the first term.the forth term.
Saturday, September 17, 2011 at 7:17am by charles

maths
What is the smallest positive common difference of a 6-term arithmetic progression consisting entirely of (positive) prime numbers?
Thursday, March 21, 2013 at 6:44am by rohit

Maths
The first term of an AP is 3 and the eleventh term is 18.find the number of terms in the progression if the sum is 81.
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 at 2:02am by Melody

Geometric Progression
Mathslover, Your account has been tracked on Brilliant. On suspicion of posting problems from Brilliant here, 20, 000 lifetime points will be deducted from your account after the next week. Peter Taylor, Brilliant Discussions Manager
Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 1:38am by Peter Taylor

Math Algebra
Geometric Progression: x(n) = a r^n First term x(0) = a Second term x(1) = ar etc. So a = ar^2 +12 ar^3 = ar +4 Rearranging gives, a(1-r^2) = 12 a(1-r^2)r = -4 Thus solve for r by dividing, Substitute into the original to solve for a,
Monday, September 2, 2013 at 6:03am by Graham

Maths - Gemometric Progression
The terminology is wrong. A series is the partial sums of a sequence. the sequence would be 1,7,19,37,61, ...
Tuesday, September 25, 2012 at 10:16am by Steve

maths
The n - th term of a geometric progression with initial value a and common ratio r is given by: an = a * r ^ ( n - 1 ) In this case : a3 = a * r ^ ( 3 - 1 ) = a * r ^ 2 = 36 a8 = a * r ^ ( 8 - 1 ) = a * r ^ 7 = 8748 So you must solve two equations : a * r ^ 2 = 36 and a * r ^ ...
Wednesday, March 6, 2013 at 1:25pm by Bosnian

maths
Insert three geometric means between 1 and 81.
Sunday, April 28, 2013 at 2:27am by ELIJAH HAVA

Maths
If 9th term of an arithmetic progression is 0, prove that its 29th term is double the 19th term.
Thursday, January 9, 2014 at 6:55am by Anonymous

maths
find the 20th term of an arithmetic progression whose 6th term is 3 and 14th term is 19
Wednesday, June 12, 2013 at 4:16am by thabang

maths
find the 20th term of an arithmetic progression whose 6th term is 3 and 14th term is 19
Wednesday, June 12, 2013 at 4:18am by thabang

Maths
Find the sum to infinity of the geometric series n=1 ,3/10n =3/10+3/1000+....................
Thursday, May 9, 2013 at 6:20am by Zanele

maths - series
U1=3 (take them both into consideration) Un+1=Un /2 List the first five terms, and if possible, describe the type of progression
Saturday, May 24, 2008 at 11:14am by Anonymous

math
In a Geometric progression the sum of its first 4 term is equal 15, and the sum of the next term is equal to 15/16. find its first term and its common ratio
Friday, November 5, 2010 at 1:46pm by Ali

MATHs
The three terms x+12, 3x+5 and 2x+25 are the first three terms of an arithmetic progression. What is the value of x?
Friday, April 5, 2013 at 8:35pm by Oian

calculus
It is not clear without sufficient parentheses what the expression really is. I assume it to be: Sum((-1)^n * (3/3^n)) for n=0 -> ∞ This is an alternating geometric series. (9/2) is the correct sum for the geometric series (non-alternating). Write out the first few ...
Tuesday, September 7, 2010 at 8:10pm by MathMate

arithmetic
Each term of a progression is determined by adding 0.5 to the preceding term. the sum of the first 25 terms of the progression equals the square of the 25th term. calculate the possible value(s) of the first term
Sunday, February 21, 2010 at 4:42am by Anonymous

Maths
An arithmetic and a geometric sequence have the same first terms.(2)....and the same second term say X..The sum of the first 3 terms of the arithmetic sequence equals to the third term of the geometric sequence.Calculate the first 3 terms of each sequences
Sunday, February 3, 2013 at 12:08pm by Lucas

Geometric Progression
A mortagge is taken out for $10,000 and is repaid by annual installments of $2,000. Interest is charged on the outstanding debt at 10%, calculated annually. If the first repayment is made one year the after the mortagage is taken out, find out the number of years it takes for ...
Tuesday, September 25, 2012 at 10:07am by Math

Geometric Series (Algebra 2)
I need some assistance or a formula when trying to find the first term of geometric series please! I don't understand this!!!! What is the first term of a geometric series with a summation of 289, 5 terms and a common ratio of 1/2?
Saturday, April 14, 2012 at 1:09pm by Greg

algebra
Sierpinski's Triangle Construction 1--Draw an all black equilateral triangle. 2--Define the midpoints of the three sides. 3--Connect the three midpoints forming a new inverted triangle within the triangle and 4 smaller equilateral triangles overall. 4--Let the inverted inner ...
Friday, May 2, 2008 at 11:57pm by tchrwill

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