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April 18, 2014

Search: How many moles of N2 will be consumed when 1.60 moles of H2 react completely in the following equation? N2 + 3H2 --> 2NH3

Number of results: 28,339

Chemistry
The FIRST think you need to understand about chemistry is that the reaction is not between grams but between moles. Let me point out some things that are common to all the answers. The delta H is positive which means that the reaction is endothermic (heat is consumed in the ...
Monday, November 2, 2009 at 3:54pm by DrBob222

Honors Chemistry
You are correct that N2 is the limiting reagent but your numbers are not correct. N2 + 3H2 ==> 2NH3 moles N2 = 28/28 = 1.0 moles NH3 = moles N2 x (2 moles NH3/1 mol N2) = 1.0 x 2 = 2.0 grams NH3 = 2.0 x 17 = 34 g. moles H2 = 25/2 = 12.5 moles. moles NH3 produced = 12.5 x (2...
Sunday, November 8, 2009 at 8:39pm by DrBob222

chem
No, it isn't correct. From the few numbers you show, I have been able to guess that you have the moles right but you used the wrong conversion to convert to moles N2. moles NH3 = 18.1/17 = about 1.06 moles N2 = 1.06 x (1 mole N2/2 moles NH3) = 1.06/2 = 0.53 moles N2. moles CuO...
Monday, November 15, 2010 at 9:50pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
N2 + 2O2 ==> 2NO2 No. You can think of this several ways. 1. The equation tells us 2 moles NO2 are given by 1 mole N2. We must divide 2moles NO2 by 2 to obtain 1; therefore, we must divide 1 mole N2 by 2 to obtain 1/2 mole. 1/2 mole N2 is the answer. 2. Use dimensional ...
Thursday, September 15, 2011 at 5:14pm by DrBob222

chemistry-stoichiometry
If 5 moles of ammonia is produced in the reaction N2 + 3 H2 2 NH3, the number of hydrogen moles consumed is ____?
Wednesday, December 14, 2011 at 8:52pm by caity

Honors Chemistry
No, no, and no. 28 g N2 = ??moles = 28/14 = 2 moles N2. 2 moles N2 x (2 moles NH3/1 mole N2) = 2*2/1 = 4 moles NH3. grams = moles NH3 x molar mass NH3 = about close to 70 g. There is NO NH2 produced. It isn't even in the equation. How much H2 remains un-reacted? You have 25 g ...
Friday, January 28, 2011 at 8:45pm by DrBob222

college chemistry
I would do this. moles NO = 388.1/molar mass NO = ?? M NO = moles/290L = ?? The problem states that you obtain 53.28 g N2. moles N2 = 53.28/molar mass N2. Then M N2 = moles/290 L = ?? Since the equation tells you that you have 1 mole O2 and 1 mole N2, you know the two are ...
Tuesday, October 12, 2010 at 6:03pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
You have the balanced equation. 2. Convert 60.0 g NaN3 to moles. moles = grams/molar mass. 3. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert moles NaN3 to moles N2. 4. Using moles N2 from #3, use PV = nRT (n = moles) to calculate volume at the specified conditions. ...
Friday, August 6, 2010 at 8:07am by DrBob222

chemistry
2NI3 ==> N2 + 3I2 5.50 g NI3 = ?? moles. moles = grams/molar mass. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert moles NI3 to moles N2 and to moles I2. N2 should be 1/2 moles NI3 and I2 should be 3/2 moles NI3. Then use PV = nRT with new conditions of T etc to ...
Saturday, October 9, 2010 at 5:22pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
You work it the same way you do any stoichiometry problem. You know Na is the limiting reagent, it will be completely consumed; therefore, how much H2O must be used according to the equation? It must be 4.00moles Na x (2 moles H2O/2 moles Na) = 4.00 x (1) = 4.00 moles H2O. You...
Thursday, January 27, 2011 at 11:56pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
35g of NaN3*(1 mole/65.01g of NaN3)= moles of NaN3 moles of NaN3*(3 moles of N2/2 moles of NaN3)=moles of N2 moles of N2*(47 L/1 mole of N2)= volume in L.
Sunday, March 3, 2013 at 2:06am by Devron

Chemistry
N2 + 3H2 ==> 2NH3 Use dimensional analysis and the coefficients. for N2. 6 mol N2 x (2 moles NH3/1 mole N2) = 12 mol NH3 produced. For H2. 12 mol H2 x (2 moles NH3/3 moles H2) = 8 moles NH3 produced. Therefore, hydrogen is the limiting reagent and N2 is in excess because in...
Sunday, February 27, 2011 at 4:48pm by DrBob222

chem.(sci)
___NH3+___O2->N2+H2O (this is not balanced) how many moles of oxygen react with 0.23 moles of NH3? HOW many moles moles of N2 will be produced when reacted with 5 mol of O2?
Thursday, January 24, 2013 at 6:10pm by tyneisha

Chemistry
How many moles N2 do you have? That is 0.146L x (1 mol/22.8L) = ?? moles N2. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert moles N2 to moles NaNO2. (Hint: that is 1:1 ratio). Convert moles NaNO2 to grams. grams = moles x molar mass. %NaNO2 = (grams NaNO2/mass sample...
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 at 5:45pm by DrBob222

chemistry
N2 + O2 --> 2 NO change in heat (delta H)= 43.2 kcal based on the reaction, which statement is true? a) 43.2 kcal are consumed when 1.00g of O2 reacts b) 43.2 kcal are consumed when 1.00g of N2 reacts c) 43.2 kcal are consumed when 1.00g of NO is produced d) 43.2 kcal are ...
Monday, November 2, 2009 at 11:07am by Katie Y.

chemistry
For the reaction between nitrogen and oxygen to form nitric oxide, beginning with 0.067 mol of N2, N2(g) + O2(g)= 2 NO(g) a. how many moles of O2 are required to completely consume the N2? b. how many moles of NO are obtained when the N2 is completely reacted?
Monday, February 13, 2012 at 1:21pm by krystal

chem
are 7.60 and 3.00 in moles? if it is, recall the formula relating moles (n) and volume (V), at a constant P and T: n1 / V1 = n2 / V2 plug in the given values to the equation: 7.60 mol/ 31.0 = (7.60 + 3) mol / V2 then solve for V2. hope this helps. :)
Friday, October 29, 2010 at 4:10am by jai

chemistry
Write the equation and balance it. N2 + 3H2 ==> 2NH3 Convert 1.34 g N2 to moles. moles = grams/molar mass. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert moles N2 to moles NH3. Convert moles NH3 to grams. g = moles x molar mass. Round to the tenths place. Post ...
Tuesday, July 6, 2010 at 6:12pm by DrBob222

chemistry
#1. Write the equation and balance it. N2 + 3H2 ==> 2NH3 initial concn. N2 = 6 N2 molecules H2 = 6 H2 molecules NH3 = 0 molecules. If it goes to completion, one of these must be the limiting reagent. How much NH3 would 6 molecules N2 produce? That will be 6 molecules N2 x (...
Friday, January 23, 2009 at 6:35pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Use PV = nRT, substitute the numbers and solve for n = number of moles N2. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert moles N2 to moles NaN3. Convert moles NaN3 to grams. g = moles x molar mass. Post your work if you get stuck.
Saturday, November 6, 2010 at 10:51pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Convert 25.9 g N2 to moles. moles = grams/molar mass. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert mols N2 to moles NH3. Convert moles NH3 to volume. moles x 22.4 L/mol = ??
Thursday, June 3, 2010 at 8:34pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Estimate the number of moles of gas (and mass of gas assuming that it is all N2) inside your family car (or a friends if you don't have one). If the amount of gas was compressed at constant temperature to fit inside a coke can what would the pressure inside the coke can be? ...
Friday, May 24, 2013 at 3:47pm by Timoefy

chemistry
1) 14 moles of Ar 12 moles of N2 2 moles of BF3 If the total number of mol present in the mixture visualized is 1.43, calculate the number of mol of N2. 2) 11 moles of N2 4 moles of CSH4 If the total number of mol present in the mixture visualized is 1.68, calculate the number...
Friday, January 15, 2010 at 1:47pm by eng

chemistry
How many moles of N2 are in 70.05 g? A mole contains 6.022 x 10^23 molecules? A molecule of N2 contains two atoms. How many atoms are in that many moles of N2? Now convert atoms Fe to moles Fe to grams Fe.
Thursday, January 8, 2009 at 11:11am by DrBob222

Chemisty
N2 + O2 ==> 2NO How many moles NO would form if we used all of the N2 and all of the O2 we needed. That is 0.590 x (2 moles NO/1 mole N2) = 1.18 moles NO formed. How many moles NO would form if we used all of the O2 and all of the N2 we needed. That will be 0.139 x (2 moles...
Monday, February 6, 2012 at 10:43pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
The moles of each reactant are: (8.8g of Mg) / (24.3gMg/moleMg) = 0.362 moles Mg 21.0g N2 / 28.01 g/mol N2 = 0.750 mol N2 The mole ratio of Mg to N2 in the chemical equation is 3/1 The mole ratio in the mixture is 0.362 mol Mg / 0.750 mol N2 or 0.483 mol Mg / 1 mol N2 ( a LOT ...
Thursday, July 24, 2008 at 6:34pm by GK

chemistry 106
a. The hint tells you that the mole fraction N2 = 0.7808; therefore the partial pressure of N2 = XN2*Ptotal b. I would sum the moles and use PV = nRT to calculate volume. Then M = moles/L.
Monday, March 1, 2010 at 4:20pm by DrBob222

chemistry HMWK help.......
There is a shorter way of doing this but I like the long way. Convert moles each to the product, then take the smaller product amount as coming from the limiting reagent. 2 moles N2 x (2 moles NH3/2 moles N2) = 2 moles NH3.(The fractions comes from the coefficients.) 5 moles ...
Thursday, November 11, 2010 at 5:40pm by DrBob222

11th grade
The reaction is N2 + 3H2 = 2 NH3 78 moles of NH3 is 4 moles, since the molecular weight is 17. You need half as many moles of N2 as you make of NH3.
Friday, February 12, 2010 at 5:12pm by drwls

Chemistry
In the Formula... Na+ + NO2- + HSO3NH2 -> HSO4- + H2O + N2 + Na+ which I know has a 1:1 ratio, How do I figure out the Moles of N2 gas expected. Molar volume = 24.627 L/mol Moles of N2 produced = .0067 mol Volume of N2 gas of STP = .165 L Original used .5062g of NaNO2 to ...
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 at 2:54pm by Nadia

AP CHEMISTRY
0.1 mole H2 will require how many moles N2 at STP? That will be 0.1 mol H2 x (1 mole N2/3 moles H2) = 0.1 mol x (1/3) = ?moles N2. What volume is that. ?mol x 22.4L/mol = ?L H2. Now convert that to the conditions listed with PV = nRT.
Thursday, December 8, 2011 at 11:53pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Into a 1.00 liter flask are placed 0.820 moles of NO and 0.223 moles of N2 and O2. What are the concentrations of NO, N2, and O2 at equilibrium? For the molarity for each, I got this: NO= .027 M N2= .0079 M O2= .0069 M balanced equation: 2NO(g) <-> N2(g) + O2 How do I ...
Tuesday, November 27, 2012 at 10:00pm by Victoria

CHEMISTRY
I balanced the equation and showed you the long way of doing it before. Here it is again. http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1289515206 The short way (but I think harder to understand) follows: N2 + 3H2 ==> 2NH3 2.....5 2 moles N2*(3moles H2/1 mole N2) = 6 moles H2. Do ...
Thursday, November 11, 2010 at 7:42pm by DrBob222

chemistry 105
Use the ideal gas law.. PV=nRT and solve for moles of N2 SO.... (1.00atm)(.0599L)=n(0.0821L*atm/mol*K)(273K) solve for n. then use "n" moles of N2 and then set up an conversion factor. so.... ___moles of N2 x( 6mol Li/2mol N2) x (MolarMass Li/1mol of Li) Then that gives you ...
Sunday, October 23, 2011 at 5:22pm by ALISON

Chemistry
There are two atoms of N per mole of N2; therefore, you should be able to produce 2 moles NH3 per 1 mole N2. Convert moles to g by # g = moles x molar mass
Thursday, September 24, 2009 at 5:23pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Nitrogen & hydrogen goes react to form ammonia gas as follows: N2(g)+3H2(g)-->2NH3(g) At a certain temperature & pressure, 1.2L of N2 reacts with 3.6L of H2. If all the N2 and H2 are consumed, what volume of NH3, at the same temperature & pressure will be produced? I tried ...
Saturday, November 3, 2012 at 2:37pm by Ezra

chemistry
Now convert moles C3H8 to moles CO2. I have about 0.06. Convert moles O2 to moles CO2. I have about 0.02. Both answers can't be correct; the correct value in limiting reagent problems is ALWAYS the smaller value and the reagent providing that value is the limiting reagent. ...
Tuesday, December 6, 2011 at 4:40pm by laura

chemistry
The combustion of propane produces carbon dioxide and steam C3H8(g)+5O2(g) 3CO2(g) +4H2O(g) all of the following statements concerning this reaction are correct except: three molecule of carbon dioxide are formed per one molecule of propane consumed. five molecules of oxygen ...
Thursday, October 3, 2013 at 4:18pm by adriane

chem
From the 0.8; that's where the volume was 60 L. By the way there is a shorter way of doing this Notice that if we use PV = nRT and solve for n = (PV/RT). Since P, R, and T are constant, the n = V; therefore, (n1/V1) = (n2/V2). As an eample, for part a, (0.2/15) = (0.8/V2) and ...
Thursday, November 1, 2012 at 10:23am by DrBob222

chemistry
N2 + O2 2 NO H = 43.2 kcal Based on the reaction shown, which statement is true? A) 43.2 kcal are consumed when 1.00 g of O2 reacts. B) 43.2 kcal are produced when 1.00 mole of NO is produced. C) 43.2 kcal are consumed when 1.00 g of N2 reacts. D) 43.2 kcal are consumed ...
Monday, November 9, 2009 at 1:13pm by brandy

Chemistry
Since the temperature is constant, the number of moles is proportional to the pressure: P1/P2 = n1/n2 P1 = 150 atm, P2 = 136 atm, n1 = 125 mol, n2 = _____? Substitute into the above equation and solve for n2 to get the moles of Ar. Convert the moles of Ar to grams (1 mole Ar...
Sunday, June 14, 2009 at 1:27pm by GK

Chemistry
2NaN3 ==> 2Na + 3N2 Use PV = nRT to convert 79.0 L N2 to moles at the conditions listed. Then use the coefficients in the balanced equation to convert moles N2 to moles NaN3. Finally, moles NaN3 = grams NaN3/molar mass NaN3.
Friday, December 9, 2011 at 1:00am by DrBob222

Chemistry
30.8 percent N2 by mass 69.2 precent O2 by mass Now you need to convert those to moles Assume 1000 g total 308/28=moles of N2 692/32 moles of O2 Now do those moles as a percent of total moles. Then, multiply 505mmHg by the percent of O2 moles.
Friday, September 26, 2008 at 5:49pm by bobpursley

Chemistry
4 moles N2 x (2 moles NH3/1 mole N2) = ??
Sunday, April 3, 2011 at 7:34pm by DrBob222

chemistry
as written, 6 moles of NO produce 5 moles of N2 (The equation doesn't balance, but I assume there are other products involved - ?) mass of N2 = 28 145g NO = 145/28 = 5.18 moles 5.18mN2 * 6mNO/5mN2 = 6.21mNO mass of NO = 30 6.21m * 30g/m = 186g
Monday, February 27, 2012 at 9:18pm by Steve

Chemistry
The problem in 1 says that it proceeds to "completion" which means to me that we don't worry about the Kc or Kp. N2 + 3H2 ==> 2NH3. Since both reactants are given we know it is a limiting reagent problem. This is a gas problem; therefore, we are allowed to use L directly as...
Wednesday, August 10, 2011 at 3:33pm by DrBob222

chemistry
1. Write the balanced chemical equation. 2. Convert 17.4 cubic feet N2 to liters. Then convert liters to moles. I assume this is at STP. 3. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert moles N2 to moles NaN3. 4. Convert moles NaN3 to grams. g = moles x molar mass. ...
Monday, March 8, 2010 at 9:31am by DrBob222

Chemistry 11th
2NH4NO3 ==> 2N2 + 4H2O + O2 STP means standard temperature and pressure. Convert 300 g NH4NO3 to moles. moles = grams/molar mass. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert moles NH4NO3 to moles N2, then to moles H2O, then to moles O2. Finally, convert moles ...
Tuesday, June 1, 2010 at 9:40pm by DrBob222

chemistry
N2 + 3H2 ==?> 2NH3 So you want 25.9 moles NH3. Convert 25.9 moles NH3 to moles N2. 25.9 mol NH3 x (1 mol N2/2 moles NH3) = 25.9 x 1/2 = ?
Sunday, February 12, 2012 at 7:01pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
This is a limiting reagent problem. 1. Write and balance the equation. 3Zn + N2 ==> Zn3N2 2. Convert 76 g Zn to moles. moles = grams/molar mass 3. Convert 17.5 g N2 gas to moles. 4a. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert moles Zn to moles of the product. ...
Sunday, February 28, 2010 at 5:04pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
3H2 + N2 ==> 2NH3 Convert 2.90 moles N2 to moles NH3 using the coefficients in the balanced equation. 2.90 x (2 moles NH3/1 mole N2) = 2.90 x 2/1 = ?? Convert moles NH3 to grams by g = moles x molar mass. b.1. Convert 13.75 g NH3 to moles. moles = grams/molar mass = 13.75/...
Monday, October 5, 2009 at 8:03pm by DrBob222

chemistry
3h2+n2 makes 2NH3's if I have 4 moles of H2 instead and 2 moles of N2 would I still just say I have 2.0 or 2.7?
Sunday, July 1, 2012 at 1:54pm by erika

CHEMISTRY
mole fraction N2 = moles N2/total number of moles. moles fraction CO2 = moles CO2/total moles. etc.
Tuesday, May 11, 2010 at 9:08pm by DrBob222

chemistry
3 h20 + N2 yields 2 NH3 how many moles of ammonia NH3 would be produced by reacting 6.00 moles of hydrogen H2 with an adequate amount of nitrogen N2
Monday, April 27, 2009 at 10:04pm by kathy

Chemistry
figure the moles of each reaction gas from PV=nRT solve for n in each case. Then you have a limiting reactants problem moles H2 and Moles O2. In a complete reaction, you should have 2 moles of H2 to each mole of O2. Examine your ration. If it is higher than that, then oxygen ...
Tuesday, October 2, 2012 at 7:50pm by bobpursley

chemistry
You can use a shortcut method when everything is in the gaseous form. N2 + 3H2 ==> 2NH3. 2.0 L N2 x (2 moles NH3/1 mole N2) = 2 x (2/1) = 4 L NH3 produced.
Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at 1:08pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Nothing but the coefficients in the balanced equation and convert to grams. 2.0 L N2 x (2 moles NH3/1 mole N2) = L NH3. Convert L NH3 to moles (there are 22.4 L in a mole), then g = moles x molar mass.
Wednesday, June 23, 2010 at 11:17am by DrBob222

Chemistry 2 AP
The chemical equation is: (NH4)2Cr2O7 --> Cr2O3 + N2 + 4H2O Find the mass of 1 mole of (NH4)2Cr2O7. Divide 10.8g (NH4)2Cr2O7 by the mass of 1 mole to get the number of moles. The number of moles of N2 and of Cr2O3 are the same as the number of moles of (NH4)2Cr2O7. The ...
Wednesday, September 3, 2008 at 9:02pm by GK

Chemistry
56 mg/100 mL = 560 mg/L = 0.560 g/L Convert to mol/L = M = 0.560/molar mass N2. partial pressure = kC k = p/c = 2.38 atm/M of N2 moles N2 = 56 g/molar mass N2. Find k, then use p = kC, substitute 5.00 for p and k from above, solve for M N2 at 5.00 atm. The author of the ...
Saturday, February 4, 2012 at 8:15pm by DrBob222

chem
Why not take some number (any number you want to use, say 40 g). Calculate moles N2 and moles Ar. moles N2 = 40/28 = about 1.4 so that x2 x 6.02E23 will be the # atoms N present. moles Ar = 40/39.9 = 1.002 and that x 6.02E23 will be the # atoms Ar. Which is larger?
Thursday, February 10, 2011 at 12:07pm by DrBob222

CHemistry Help pleaseee
The balanced chemical reaction is: 2C2H2 + 5O2 --> 4CO2 + 2H2O The mole ratio of C2H2 to O2 is 2 : 5. Rearranging the Ideal Gas Law, we get: n = PV / RT or Let n1 = P1V1/RT (moles of C2H2) and n2 = P2V2/RT (moles of O2 n1/n2 = P1V1/RT * RT/P2V2 Simplifying, n1/n2 = P1V1 / ...
Monday, October 13, 2008 at 7:27pm by GK

physics
Snells Law says that, for the limiting critical reflection angle, 1.98 sin 60 = N2*sin 90 = N2 N2 = 1.715
Tuesday, November 22, 2011 at 8:15pm by drwls

chemistry
It appears the mass consumed is 150.56-148.10 g It was consumed in 20 sec, or .3333min rate= mass/(molmass*.333) in moles/minute.
Sunday, January 9, 2011 at 5:24pm by bobpursley

chemistry
Ammonia, NH3, can be made by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen. N2 + 3H2 = 2NH3 How many moles of NH3 can be made if 7.5 moles of H2 react with enough N2? Please help!
Monday, March 19, 2012 at 5:42pm by Britt

chem 1
since N2 + O2 = 2NO, each mole of N2 requires 1 mole of O2. convert your grams to moles, and the molecule with the fewer moles is the limiting reagent.
Sunday, October 21, 2012 at 2:12pm by Steve

chemistry
First write the balanced reaction. 3H2 + N2 => 2 NH3 If the reaction were stoichiometric, there would be three times as many moles of H2 as N2. That also means three times the volume. In your case, there are more than 3 times as many moles of H2 as N2. It should be obvious ...
Wednesday, June 30, 2010 at 11:39am by drwls

stoichiometry
first, make sure the equation is balanced,, to determine which is limiting, we calculate the amount of product produced by each given: for 6 mol N2: 6 mol N2 * (2 mol NH3 / 1 mol N2) = 12 mol NH3 for 12 mol H2: 12 mol H2 * (2 mol NH3 / 3 mol H2) = 8 mol NH3 (a) since H2 ...
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 at 11:00pm by Jai

chemistry
First determine which is the limiting reagent. moles C3H8 = 1g/molar mass = about 0.02 but you need to do it more accurately. moles O2 = 1g/molar mass = about 0.02. Now convert moles C3H8 to moles CO2. I have about 0.06. Convert moles O2 to moles CO2. I have about 0.02. Both ...
Monday, December 5, 2011 at 6:48pm by DrBob222

stoichiometry
**i reposted this** first, make sure the equation is balanced,, to determine which is limiting, we calculate the amount of product produced by each given: for 6 mol N2: 6 mol N2 * (2 mol NH3 / 1 mol N2) = 12 mol NH3 for 12 mol H2: 12 mol H2 * (2 mol NH3 / 3 mol H2) = 8 mol NH3...
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 at 10:59pm by Jai

Chemistry
based on the following chemical equation HCN+O2 yields N2+CO2+H20 identify the limiting reactants and the mass of N2 produced when 100.0g of HCN react with 100.0g of O2. a. the limiting reactant is HCN and 25.9g of N2 are produced b. the limiting reactant is O2 and 35.0g of N2...
Friday, April 27, 2012 at 10:39pm by RoseBud

Chemistry
You want to convert 8.2 g O2 to moles, 8.2 g N2 to moles, 8.2 g H2 to moles. Then determine the mole fraction of each. partial pressure each = Xof each*1.5 atm. moles fraction, O2 for example, = moles O2/total number of moles.
Monday, August 2, 2010 at 6:24pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
I could use some help please. Ammmonia, NH3, can be made by reacting Nitrogen with Hydrogen. N2+3H2=2NH3 How many moles of NH3 can be made if 7.5 moles of H2 react eith enough N2? Thank-you in advance for any help
Monday, March 18, 2013 at 7:28am by Sara

Chemistry
Nitrogen and hydrogen gases react to form ammonis gas as follows: N2(g)+3H2(g)-->2NH3(g) At a certain temperature and pressure, 1.2L of N2 reacts with 3.6L of H2. If all the N2 and H2 are consumed, what volume of NH3 at the same temperature and pressure will be produced? I'...
Wednesday, December 12, 2012 at 9:42pm by Ezra

CHEMISTRY
2H2S + 3O2 → 2H2O +2SO2 given the balanced equation, if 4 moles of hydrogen sulfide react: How many moles of oxygen consumed? How many moles of water and sulfur dioxide are produced?
Monday, May 21, 2012 at 11:16pm by Theodore

Chemistry
Balance the equation. Convert 1.25 g NH4NO3 to moles. Convert moles NH4NO3 to moles N2, moles O2, and moles H2O. (Three conversions each done separately). Convert moles of each to grams of each.
Thursday, May 21, 2009 at 8:01pm by DrBob222

chem
Your reaction equation should be 6Li + N2 = 2 Li3N 59.1 ml at STP is (59.1*10^-3 l)/(22.4 l/mol) = 2.64*10^-3 moles of N2. That will react with 6 times as many moles of Li. Compute the mass of that.
Friday, June 12, 2009 at 11:06pm by drwls

chemistry
so we did a chem lab and one of the questions is to tabulate the amount of S2O3 consumed in moles and times (sec) for each run. I'm just not sure how to calculate the amount consumed. Can someone please explain how?
Saturday, February 1, 2014 at 10:40pm by Anonymous

Chemistry
I assume 28.317 is the conversion factor for cubic feet to L and I assume 115 ft^3 is the volume of the inside of the car. 28.317 l x 115ft^3 = 3256 l at a standard temperature (0 C, 40 F) 3256 l x 1mole N2/22.44 l = 145.4 moles N2 Number of moles = 145.4 moles N2 You are ok ...
Friday, May 24, 2013 at 3:47pm by DrBob222

chemistry
For the following reaction: 2NH3 ----> N2 + 3H3 6.42 moles of NH3 were placed in a 7.4 L flask and allowed to come to equilibrium. 3.60 moles of NH3 remain at equilibrium. Calculate Kc for the reaction.
Thursday, April 15, 2010 at 5:50pm by Sue

chemistry
For the following reaction: 2NH3 ----> N2 + 3H3 6.42 moles of NH3 were placed in a 7.4 L flask and allowed to come to equilibrium. 3.60 moles of NH3 remain at equilibrium. Calculate Kc for the reaction.
Thursday, April 15, 2010 at 5:59pm by Sue

stoichiometrics
What is the mass of each and which is greater? 1g H2 + ?N2 and 1g H2 + ?O2 I've balanced them to this point: 3H2 + N2 ===> 2NH3 2H2 + O2 ===> 2H2O Help please, I am stuck on this step and cannot get any further. Thanks, PJ Good! You've done the hard part. For the first ...
Sunday, October 22, 2006 at 4:40pm by Penny

chemistry
When all are gaseous, one may use L as if L = moles, a good short cut to remember. Second, we must make sure both are at the same pressure; that can be accomplished by changing H2 to 1.00 atm. 1L H2 @ 2.00 atm = 2 L H2 @ 1.00 atm. 2NO(g) + 2H2(g) N2(g) + 2H2O(g) Use the ...
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 at 1:30am by DrBob222

Chemistry
Ammonia, at stp, 1.5L of N2 reacts with 4.5L of H2, if N2 and H2 are consumed, what volume of NH3 at stp will be produced?
Tuesday, November 1, 2011 at 1:17pm by Michael

Chem
From previous experiments, you have the following information. N2(g)+O2(g)<--->2NO(g) Kc=2.3*10^-19 2NO(g)+O2(g)<--->2NO2(g) Kc=3*10^6 using that information, how many moles of NO2(g) will be made if you started with 1 moles of N2(g) and 2 moles of O2 (g)? N2(g)+...
Sunday, October 7, 2012 at 9:45pm by Allyx32

Chemistry
N2(g) + H2(g) -> NH3(g) ; how many moles of NH3 is is produced when 0.67 moles of N2 reacts with H2?
Sunday, March 4, 2012 at 7:49pm by Suzanne

chemistry
Use PV = nRT and calculate n, number of moles. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert moles N2 to moles NaN3. Now convert moles NaN3 to grams. g = moles x molar mass.
Monday, April 19, 2010 at 9:01pm by DrBob222

AP CHEMISTRY NEED HELP PLEASE
You must convert moles H2 to moles N2. You do that using the coefficients in the balanced equation. The equation TELLS you that it takes 3 moles H2 for each mole N2; i.e., 1/3 mol N2 = 1 mole H2 so 0.1 mole H2 will require 1/3 of that or 0.0333 moles N2. No, your answer isn't ...
Thursday, December 8, 2011 at 10:54pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
We did a lab. The reaction of zinc and iodine. We put 1 g of zinc with 1 g of iodine.. and used alcohol. Is the equation Zn + I2 ----> ZnI(2)? The moles of Zn atoms consumed were .003 mol. The moles of I atoms consumed were .004 mol. The class got a ratio and we averaged it...
Wednesday, September 15, 2010 at 4:17pm by Morgan

chemistry
how many moles of N2 (g) re present in 1.00 of N2 (g) at 100 c and 1 atm?
Tuesday, April 5, 2011 at 12:11pm by heather

Ohlone
how many moles of oxygen are consumed in burning 1.6 moles of benzene, C6H6?
Thursday, October 7, 2010 at 2:22am by Kim

Chemistry
How many moles of HCl are consumed by the reaction of .150 moles of magnesium?
Monday, February 10, 2014 at 1:04am by Janelle

chem
First, how do you know this is a limiting reagent problem. Because BOTH reactants are given. 1. You have the equation. 2. You have1.25 moles N2 in the problem. 3. Convert 50.0 g oxygen to moles. moles = grams/molar mass. 4. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, ...
Tuesday, November 9, 2010 at 8:32pm by DrBob222

stoichiometry
If 3.00 moles of water are produced, how many moles of oxygen must be consumed?
Thursday, May 8, 2008 at 11:22am by holli

chemistry
why is moles of CO2 consumed equal to the combined moles of BaO and CaO?
Saturday, November 6, 2010 at 10:50pm by Anonymous

Chemistry
-CORRECTION- N2 + O2 --> 2 NO change in heat (delta H)= 43.2 kcal based on the reaction, which statement is true? a) 43.2 kcal are consumed when 1.00g of O2 reacts b) 43.2 kcal are consumed when 1.00g of N2 reacts c) 43.2 kcal are consumed when 1.00g of NO is produced d) 43...
Monday, November 2, 2009 at 3:54pm by Katie Y.

chemistry
In the reaction of N2 and H2 to produce NH3, how many moles of N2 will produce 25.9 moles NH3?
Sunday, February 12, 2012 at 7:01pm by Anonymous

Chemistry
How many moles of H2O are produced when 6 moles of o2 is consumed in burning meyhyl Alchohol
Monday, April 1, 2013 at 9:42am by George

chemistry
close but not quite. Yes, zero moles NH3. Yes, 0.1875 = 0.188 mole N2H4. No, N2. You USE 0.0625 moles N2, you had 0.100 initially; therefore, the amount remaining is 0.100 - 0.0625 (you are allowed three significant figures so I would not round that to 0.063).
Monday, November 14, 2011 at 11:09am by DrBob222

chem
Limiting reagent problems, basically, are two stoichiometry problems in one. There is a "little" shorter method but I like the following one. 1. You have the equation. 2. Convert 18.1 g NH3 to moles. moles = grams/molar mass. 3. Convert 90.4 g CuO to moles the same way. 4. ...
Sunday, November 14, 2010 at 11:00pm by DrBob222

Physics
Compute the number of moles n first. You can then say that: n = n_{N2} + n_{O2} You also know that: n_{N2}/n = 0.79 and n_{O2}/n = 0.79 This allows you to solve for n_{N2} and n_{O2}. Using the molar masses for N2 and O2 you can then obtain the mass.
Sunday, April 20, 2008 at 11:28am by Count Iblis

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