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April 18, 2014

Search: Chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)

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chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
N2 + 2F2 ---> 2NF3 calculate the standard enthalpy
Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 1:36pm by Anonymous

Chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
Thank You for my final temperature I got around 83.1 degrees celsius
Wednesday, February 15, 2012 at 11:12pm by Rose Bud

Chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
Thermochemistry determine the final temperature if 45.67 kJ of heat energy is removed from 18.5 g of H2O (g) at 122 degrees Celsius useful information sp. heat H2O (s) = 2.03 J/g(degree C) sp heat H2O (l) = 4.18 J/g(degree C) Sp heat H2O (g) = 2.01 J/g(degree C) enthalpy H Fus...
Wednesday, February 15, 2012 at 11:12pm by Rose Bud

Chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
How did you know that the temperature dropped down to 100 degrees C? I have the same exact problem, except the heat is being added, not taken away. And the initial temperature is 73.5 degrees C.
Wednesday, February 15, 2012 at 11:12pm by Neva

chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
You need to check the post carefully. The equation you want is not balanced. I think you have made two typos. I think the left H2O should be H2O2 and I think the right H2) should be H2O
Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 1:36pm by DrBob222

Chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
Awesome I am defiantly starting to understand this stuff better. .065L x (.600 mol/L) = 0.0390 mol q=MC(delta T) = 149g x 4.184 J/g(C) x 3.5 celsius = 2181.9 J =2.2 kJ Then I did 2.2 kJ / 0.0390 mol = 56 kJ/mol for my final answer I got 56 kJ/mol
Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 1:06am by Rose Bud

chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
You are defiantly right. it is suppose to be 2H2O2(l) and 4H2O(l) and the first equation is suppose to be -622.2 kJ/mol actually they are all suppose to be kJ/mol, but that was a typo on the exercise. For a final answer I got -818.2 kJ/mol i used the first equation as is. then...
Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 1:36pm by Rose Bud

college chemistry-thermochemistry
thanx so much!
Saturday, November 8, 2008 at 10:38pm by maryanne

chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
calculate enthalpy of H for the reaction N2H4(l) + 2H2O(l) -> N2(g) + 4H2)(l) Given the reactions N2H4(l) + O2(g) -> N2(g) + 2H2O(l) Enthalpy of H = -6.22.2 kJ H2(g) + (1/2)O2(g) -> H2O(l) enthalpy of H = -285.8 kJ/mol H2(g) + O2(g) -> H2O2(l) enthalpy of H = -187....
Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 1:14am by Rose Bud

chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
calculate enthalpy of H for the reaction N2H4(l) + 2H2O(l) -> N2(g) + 4H2)(l) Given the reactions N2H4(l) + O2(g) -> N2(g) + 2H2O(l) Enthalpy of H = -6.22.2 kJ H2(g) + (1/2)O2(g) -> H2O(l) enthalpy of H = -285.8 kJ/mol H2(g) + O2(g) -> H2O2(l) enthalpy of H = -187....
Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 1:36pm by Rose Bud

Chemistry
Thermochemistry Essay Rough Draft
Friday, March 7, 2014 at 11:36pm by ziane

Chemistry
I need to perform a chemical demonstration on thermochemistry or kinetics or colligative properties for chemistry class. However I cannot have demonstrations involving fire.
Tuesday, January 12, 2010 at 8:14am by alex

Chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
A 65.0 g sample of 0.600 M HI at 18.46 degrees celsius is added to 84.0 g of solution containing excess KOH, also at 18.46 degrees celsius. The final temperature is 21.96 degrees celsius. Calculate the enthalpy of H for the reaction. Assume the specific heat of the solution is...
Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 1:06am by Rose Bud

college chemistry-thermochemistry
I just posted it at the original spot below.
Saturday, November 8, 2008 at 10:38pm by DrBob222

college chemistry-thermochemistry
ya you're right i accidently put the wrong value in!
Saturday, November 8, 2008 at 8:49pm by maryanne

5th grade
12/12 means minus one = 6 17/12 when you subtract 5 7/12 = 1 10/12 (or 5/6) Sra Please label School Subject as MATH, but not 5th grade.
Tuesday, December 14, 2010 at 5:38pm by SraJMcGin

Chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
You have 65.0 g soln from HI and 84.0 g H2O with the KOH so total mass soln is 149 g. q = mass H2O x specific heat water x (delta T). USUALLY delta H for a reaction is done in kJ/mol. This problem has no easy way to get to moles but q/mol = J/mol and you can convert that to kJ...
Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 1:06am by DrBob222

College Chemistry
Go to this site and scroll down to "Energy and Enthalpy" which is approximately half way down the page. The first sentence talks about the "system" and the "surroundings." http://www.chemistryexplained.com/Te-Va/Thermochemistry.html What are the reaction products and reactants...
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 at 9:31pm by DrBob222

Chemistry-Thermochemistry (grade 12)
I would do this in steps. First, heat released in cooling from 122 to 100. q = mass x specific heat steam x (deltaT) q = 18.5 x 2.01 x 22= about 818 approximately. You should confirm ALL of these numbers. q = heat released on condensing the steam. q = mass x heat vap = 18.5 x ...
Wednesday, February 15, 2012 at 11:12pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
I have a test on the general concepts of thermochemistry tomorrow. how should i study for it since its not based on problem solving, just concepts?
Wednesday, October 24, 2007 at 12:40pm by Nick

Chemistry
ok thank you, we're doing thermochemistry right now, so we actually just did that calorimeter lab yesterday, and we've been using that equation.. i dont know if my teacher wants us to use methods we already know.
Friday, September 14, 2007 at 7:31pm by Dick Rogers

AIG 4th Grade Math
Let x = total players 1/2 x + 1/6 x + 1/6 x + 1/12 x = x - 2 Get common denominator. 6/12 x + 2/12 x + 2/12 x + 1/12 x = x - 2 Add like terms. 11/12 x = x - 2 Multiply both sides by 12. 11x = 12x - 24 You should be able to take it from there. I hope this helps.
Tuesday, January 19, 2010 at 8:56pm by PsyDAG

6th grade Math
sum = 1 8/12 + 2 9/12 + 3 4/12 + 1 8/12 + 2 9/12 sum = 9 + 38/12 = 9 + 3 2/12 = 12 1/6 av = (12 1/6) / 5 av = 2 2/30 = 2 13/30 part 2 x = 15 - 12 1/6 x = 14 6/6 - 12 1/6 x = 2 5/6
Wednesday, January 7, 2009 at 8:37pm by Damon

chemistry-thermochemistry
A student mixes 85.7 g of water at 68.0°C with 50.7 g of water at 24.5°C in an insulated flask. What is the final temperature of the combined water
Sunday, October 5, 2008 at 12:55pm by james

Thermochemistry
Thanks!
Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 10:44pm by Sean

8th grade
n+3=12 12 - 3 _____ 9 n+3=12 CHECK IT! 9+3=12 9 n=9 +3 ___ 12 TADA!!!
Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 5:06pm by krys

Thermochemistry
w is work
Friday, October 30, 2009 at 4:54pm by Kyle

4th Grade Math: Help Is Needed ASAP
My son is in the fourth grade and is needing help with these math problems. Can someone please help him with these problems. 1. 2/3+2/9= 2. 3/5+3/10= 3. 5/12+1/3= 4. Find the sum of 1/6 and 1/12 5. Add 1/4 to the answer in Exercise 4. 6. What is the sum of 1/8, 1/4, and 3/8? 7...
Monday, November 18, 2013 at 8:21pm by Tim

Math (Grade 12)
4 x 3 = 12 21 – 2 = 19 4 x 2 = 8 5 x 4 = 20 2 + 1 = 3 14 x 12 = 168 4 x 12 = 48 2 + 4 = 6
Wednesday, September 17, 2008 at 5:50pm by Ahmed

Math (Grade 12)
4 x 3 = 12 21 – 2 = 19 4 x 2 = 8 5 x 4 = 20 2 + 1 = 3 14 x 12 = 168 4 x 12 = 48 2 + 4 = 6
Wednesday, September 17, 2008 at 5:50pm by Ahmed

ThermoChemistry
How do you find [delta]Hvap?
Wednesday, March 19, 2008 at 10:21pm by James

thermochemistry college
Yes! ...She has a big butt!
Tuesday, December 8, 2009 at 8:42pm by JoJo

5th grade -- Correction!
Thank you, EG. I missed the minus sign. This time I get: 8 3/12 - 4 10/12 = 7 15/12 - 4 10/12 = 3 5/12
Sunday, January 3, 2010 at 5:23pm by Ms. Sue

5th grade
8 1/4 - 4 5/6 First find the common denominator and change the fractions to equivalent fractions. 8 1/4 = 8 3/12 4 5/6 = 4 10/12 Then add: 8 3/12 + 4 10/12 = 12 13/12 = 13 1/12
Sunday, January 3, 2010 at 5:23pm by Ms. Sue

9th grade Algebra
1(2/3) + 2(1/4) + 3(1/12) = 8/12 + 6/12 + 3/12 = 17/12 Divide 12 into 17.
Sunday, April 25, 2010 at 8:42pm by PsyDAG

college chemistry-thermochemistry
I got: delta H= 482.79J 482.79/150gNH4NO3 x 80gNH4NO3/mol NH4NO3 =2574.88J/mol =2.575 kJ/mol Is this right?
Saturday, November 8, 2008 at 8:49pm by maryanne

Thermochemistry
Yes, and for some problems it is written that way.
Tuesday, December 2, 2008 at 11:55pm by DrBob222

grade 12 chemistry
explain the concept of a “stock solution” and standard solutions as if you were explaining it to a friend who is not studying chemistry.
Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at 3:18am by michael

math grade 5
3. you need 12 different outcomes: what about selecting a student at random and finding the probability of him being in grade 1-12? 4. How can you get more than 10 on a spin of two times? the highest number is 4.
Monday, June 6, 2011 at 8:55pm by bobpursley

Grade 12 chemistry
thats not an answer...
Saturday, December 31, 2011 at 6:58pm by s

11th grade
The students of litchfield High school are in grades 9,10,11,12. Of the students , 1/4th are in 9th grade, 1/3rd are in 10th grade, 1/6th is in 11th grade and there are 300 in the 12th grade, how many students are there all together?
Friday, November 6, 2009 at 12:30pm by stefanie coplin

9th grade Algebra
8/12 3/12 1/12 12/12=1
Sunday, April 25, 2010 at 8:42pm by Danny

Math - average grade
Does anyone know how to calculate average point grade? I have the following data: grade D - 2 students - 4,9 percent grade C - 6 students - 14,7 percent grade B - 12 students - 29,2 percent grade A - 21 students - 51,2 percent What is the average grade? This is NOT my homework...
Wednesday, February 17, 2010 at 10:32am by refy

college chemistry-thermochemistry
A 1.50g sample of NH4NO3(s) is added to 35.0g of water in a foam cup and stirred intil it dissolves. The temperature of the solution drops from 22.7 to 19.4 degrees celcius. What is the heat of dissolution of NH4NO3, expressed in kJ/mol NH4NO3?
Saturday, November 8, 2008 at 8:49pm by maryanne

Fourth grade math
Each column will have 2 1's, 2 2's, and 2 3's. So, each columns will total to 12. so, adding in the carries between columns, 12 12 12 makes 1332
Friday, August 30, 2013 at 2:10am by Steve

chemistry grade 12
see above.
Wednesday, February 4, 2009 at 5:09pm by bobpursley

4th grade math
six , because if you mark number of friends with x you would get it like this : 3(x-4)=x 3x-12=x 3x-x=12 2x=12 X=12/2 X=6 and someone posted this question before you did
Thursday, April 22, 2010 at 4:24pm by maja

ap chemistry
DrBob222, thank you. Is there any online worksheets related to chemistry 8th edition zumdahl up to chapter 9. The topic include.. -percent composition of compounds and formula for compound like molecular and empirical -balancing equations -limiting reactant -theoretical and ...
Sunday, November 4, 2012 at 4:07pm by zoya

Chemistry grade 12
I will be happy to critique your thinking on this.
Thursday, January 8, 2009 at 5:02pm by bobpursley

6th grade math
0 - 12 = -12 Like 12º below zero in terms of temperature.
Saturday, January 28, 2012 at 12:27pm by PsyDAG

3rd grade Math
4+4+4 = 12 or if you do multiplication 4*3 = 12 or draw it # # # # # # # # # # # # add those up and you have 12
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 at 2:17am by Damon

Math 7th grade
6 11/12=6+(11/12) 6*12=72 , 6=(72/12) 6+(11/12)=(72+11)/12= (83/12) 4 5/12=4+5/12 4*12=48 , 4=(48/12) 4+5/12=(48+5)/12= (53/12) 6 11/12-4 5/12=(83/12)-(53/12)=(30/12)= (5*6)/(2*6)=5/2
Sunday, October 17, 2010 at 9:09pm by Bosnian

grade 4 math
No. You need to get a common denominator for the two fractions. 2/3 = 6/9 6/9 + 6/9 = 12/9 Now we reduce 12/9. 12/9 = 1 3/9 = 1 1/3
Thursday, July 23, 2009 at 10:08pm by Ms. Sue

Thermochemistry
heat=167*c*(3.7) Normally, one wants enthalpy on a per mole basis, if so, divide by 2.
Sunday, October 17, 2010 at 9:50pm by bobpursley

Thermochemistry
C2H5OH + 3O2 ==> 2CO2 + 3H2O deltaHrxn = (2*DHfCO2)+(3*DHfH2O)-(DHfC2H5OH = ??
Monday, April 18, 2011 at 5:16pm by DrBob222

Thermochemistry
Hint: Write the balanced combustion reaction. You can find the standard enthalpies of formation for O2, CO2, and H2O from many sources, including the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. Solution: Balanced combustion reaction: C8H18 + 12.5 O2 --> 8 CO2 + 9 H2O From the ...
Sunday, December 4, 2011 at 8:58pm by Katie

math fifth grade
amswer=12 factors of 48 1,2,3,4,6,8,12,16,24,48 cross out 1and 3 not even the only one that adds up to three is 12 and 6x2is 12 so it is a multipule of 6
Sunday, September 23, 2007 at 12:44pm by allyson

7th grade
You first have to find a common denominator for all three fractions. Then, add the two positive fractions and subtract the negative fraction. Example: 1/2 - 3/4 + 5/6 = 6/12 - 9/12 + 10/12 = 7/12
Tuesday, October 13, 2009 at 8:16pm by Ms. Sue

thermochemistry
Calculate the amount of heat liberated (in kJ) from 374 g of mercury when it cools from 83.7°C to 19.1°C.
Sunday, October 5, 2008 at 12:56pm by james

thermochemistry
what is the formula to find the mass of propane that must be combusted to produce 188.3kj of energy?
Saturday, August 11, 2012 at 10:30am by Anonymous

college chemistry-thermochemistry
I worked the problem and obtained a different answer. Isn't that 1.50 g (not 150)? I used 80.04 for the molar mass of NH4NO3 and obtained 25.762 kJ/mol which I would round to 25.8 kJ/mol.
Saturday, November 8, 2008 at 8:49pm by DrBob222

9th grade
y/6>y/12+1 multiply each term by 12, the common denominator. 2y > y + 12 subtract y from each side y > 12
Sunday, May 3, 2009 at 12:46pm by Reiny

grade 9 math algerbra
try this x=3+h x+12+(h+12)=51 (3+h+12)+h+12=51 solve for h
Monday, March 9, 2009 at 7:56pm by bryce

Grade 12 Chemistry
M = moles/L. Substitute and plug into the calculator.
Tuesday, March 22, 2011 at 9:50pm by DrBob222

5th grade math
(2/3) * (3/4) = 6/12 = 1/2 12-m = 5 2/3 -m = 5 2/3 - 12 -m = -6 1/3 m = 6 1/3
Sunday, November 28, 2010 at 8:28pm by Ms. Sue

Thermochemistry
When 1 mol of a gas burns at constant pressure, it produces 2426 J of heat and does 6 kJ of work. What is Delta H, q, and w?
Monday, October 18, 2010 at 7:44pm by Michelle

Thermochemistry
alchol releases 29.7kJ/g when it burns. Convert this value to the number of calories per gram
Sunday, December 4, 2011 at 8:58pm by Anonymous

6th grade
There may be other ways to work this but I would convert both 2/3 and 1/2 to a common denominator. That would be x/6 2/3 = 4/6 1/2 = 3/6 so 3.5/6 would be between the two; however, your teacher may not accept that since the numerator is a fraction. So what to do? Convert both ...
Sunday, October 26, 2008 at 9:57pm by DrBob222

6th grade fraction comparisons
Look at the fractions. 75/100 = each number is divisible by 25 = 3/4 (the same) / 11/12 = take 3/4 X 3 = 9/12 (that is smaller than 11/12 / 2/3 = take that x 4 = 8/12 (smaller than 9/12 / 3/8 = 2 x 3/4 = 6/8 and THAT is larger than 3/8 You were on the right track but just ...
Thursday, June 9, 2011 at 11:33pm by SraJMcGin

7th grade math Ms. Sue
I still cannot figure this one out can you please tell me... 11/12 + (-2/3) = ? The answer choices are 1/4 13/12 -1/6 -7/12
Wednesday, October 3, 2012 at 8:58pm by Delilah

Letter to Teacher
Oh I mads a mistake i'm in the 12 grade i'm a 12th grade i was thinking about 7th grade sorry about that
Sunday, October 2, 2011 at 7:18pm by Laruen

6th grade math
3/4x-2/3x=2/5 3/4 = 9/12 2/3 = 8/12 9/12x - 8/12x = 2/5 1/12x = 2/5 x = (2/5) / (1/12) x = (2/5) * (12/1) x = 24/5 = 4 4/5
Wednesday, September 21, 2011 at 4:44pm by Ms. Sue

chemistry-thermochemistry
call the 85 g water water1, and the other water2. sum of heat changes =0 heatfromwater1+heatfromwater1=0 One will be negative, as one of them cools. mass1*cw*deltaTemp1+mass2*cw+deltaTemp2=0 I assume you can handle it from here. Tf in each will be the same, ti for each is ...
Sunday, October 5, 2008 at 12:55pm by bobpursley

math 5th grade
change them to common denominators. I will do a, c for you. a) 10/12<5/12 ? b) c) 10/12<9/12 ? d) so you see, a, c are not true. Duh.
Monday, February 15, 2010 at 5:27pm by bobpursley

Thermochemistry
The work is done against friction while the ball slows down. Consider it equal to the loss of kinetic energy
Friday, October 30, 2009 at 4:54pm by drwls

thermochemistry
q = mass water x heat vap. I would convert 491g H2O to mols by dividing by 18 g/mol.
Friday, April 13, 2012 at 12:11am by DrBob222

Chemistry
please help! Is RTP in chemistry (thermochemistry and electrochemistry) referring to room temperature of 25degreeC (or 298K) and 1atm, or 20degreeC (293K) and 1atm? In my lecture notes on gas law, they stated RTP refers to 25degreeC, but in my electrochem lecture notes they ...
Sunday, November 6, 2011 at 4:57am by Hailey

Chem. Copper and Chromium. Random Q...
So, I have a general chemistry test. My teacher said to know... "Copper and Chromium exceptions." I have no idea what that means. I am currently learning about Thermochemistry and the Quantum Theory of an Atom. Do you have any idea what this might mean?? Thank you for any ...
Saturday, November 15, 2008 at 1:13am by Sarah

6th grade
y-12=16 y - 12 + 12 = 16 + 12 y = 28
Tuesday, October 13, 2009 at 6:10pm by Ms. Sue

AP CHEMISTRY
ITS a college class in high school. Im takin it in grade 12
Thursday, March 8, 2012 at 6:05pm by MIKE

6th grade math
1/6 + 1/4 = 2/12 + 3/12 = 5/12
Wednesday, September 26, 2012 at 9:54am by Steve

4th grade
12 + 12 + 12 + 12 + 1 + 1
Monday, January 3, 2011 at 7:51pm by dk

7th grade math
30=12d Divide both sides by the co-efficient. 12/12 leaves you with d. 30/12 leaves you with 2.5 D=2.5 Check your work. 30= 12*2.5 12*2.5= 30 30=30
Friday, November 26, 2010 at 2:22pm by Lily

Thermochemistry
3CO(g)+ Fe2O3(s) --> 2Fe(s) + 3CO2(g) + 24.7 kJ. How much heat is released when 56 grams of CO react?
Tuesday, December 14, 2010 at 11:22pm by Hannah

computer science
ineed help with c++. i am using code blocks and i have a problem with the compiler. when I run this code ¡é # include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { cout<<"Hello World!"<<endl return(0); } this message keep pops up. ¡é "It seems that this file ...
Sunday, March 7, 2010 at 7:52pm by lj

7th grade Algebra
sub in the value LS = 4(3) - 9(6-5(3)) = 12 - 9(6-11) = 12 - 9(-5) = 12 + 45 = 57 ≠ RS , so , w=3 is not a solution 4w - 54 + 45w = 44 49w = 98 w = 2
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 at 11:33pm by Reiny

thermochemistry
A 12.48g sample of an unknown metal, heated to 99'c was then plunged into 50mL of 25'c water. The temperature of the water rose to 28.1'c. The specific heat of water is 4.184J/g. 1. How many joules of energy did the water absorb? 2. How many joules of energy did the metal lose...
Sunday, November 23, 2008 at 10:33pm by nichole

math 2nd grade
The word 'of' means to multiply. 3/5 of 10 3/5 X 10 = 30/5 = 6 1/3 of 12 1/3 X 12 = 12/3 = 4 hope this helps.
Monday, March 5, 2012 at 10:58pm by Jo

4th grade math
the answer is 168 because there are 12 inches in a foot. you could add 12 for 14 times or do 12*14.
Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 7:31pm by jenny

Pre-Calculus
74. Road Grade When driving down a mountain road, you notice warning signs indicating that it is a "12% grade." This means that the slope of the road is -12/100. Approximate the amount of horizontal change in your position if you note from elevation markers that you have ...
Thursday, February 3, 2011 at 4:48pm by Sam

ThermoChemistry
with ln(p1/p2)=deltaHvap/R x (1/T2-1/T2)
Wednesday, March 19, 2008 at 10:21pm by Mikal

11th grade
Let AT be all together. 1/4 AT+ 1/3 AT + 1/6 AT + 300=AT 3/12 AT + 4/12 AT + 2/12 AT+300=AT 9/12 AT +300=AT solve for AT
Friday, November 6, 2009 at 12:30pm by bobpursley

12th grade
Can somebody tell me what to do next for solving polynomial equations? x^3 - 3x^2 -4x + 12= 0 I got the factors of 12 and i used 2. (x+2) (x^2 + x + 12)=0 What do I do next?
Tuesday, October 5, 2010 at 12:10am by Joe

5th grade math
the common denominator is 12. 2/3x4 for each of the numbers=8/12. 3/4x3 for each of the numbers=9/12.
Monday, January 9, 2012 at 4:30pm by Anonymous

5th grade (math)
The sum of the fractions you listed is 11/12, so the remaining two people must be 1/12 of the total. That means there are 24. 12 + 4 + 4 + 2 + 2 = 24
Thursday, May 7, 2009 at 7:34pm by drwls

thermochemistry college
No, but she is listed in the school directory website as a member of the chemistry faculty. http://www.greenriver.edu/Staff/Default.aspx
Tuesday, December 8, 2009 at 8:42pm by drwls

college chemistry-thermochemistry
How much heat is absorbed. mass H2O x specific heat water x delta T. 35.0g x 4.18 J/g*C x (22.7-19.4) = ?? That is delta H/1.50 g NH4NO3. Change that to delta H/mol NH4NO3 and change to kJ/mol. Post your work if you get stuck.
Saturday, November 8, 2008 at 8:49pm by DrBob222

thermochemistry college
does anyone know profesor of green river community college, auburn,wa, sue critchlow ????
Tuesday, December 8, 2009 at 8:42pm by eva

7th grade
V = πr^2 * h 12 * 12 * 12 cubic inches = 1 cubic foot I'll let you do the calculations.
Monday, April 12, 2010 at 9:12pm by PsyDAG

4th grade
two eqtns....X+12=Y;AND X+Y=40......fromX+12=y thenX+X+12=40;2X+12=40 THEREFORE X=14....IF X=14 AND X+Y=40,THEN Y=26ANS...26DOLLARS FOR SWEATER.
Monday, September 27, 2010 at 4:41pm by mimi

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