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April 16, 2014

Search: Chemistry-Equation

Number of results: 132,613

chemistry
Add equation 1 to the reverse of equation 2 to equation 3. That will give you twice the equation you want and you can take half of it later. Add kJ/mole for equation to the negative of equation 2 to the kJ for equation 3. All of that together gives twice what you are looking ...
Sunday, April 11, 2010 at 3:57pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Use equation as is (using arrows to separate reactants from products is a MUST if you are to do this properly) and the H as is. Reverse equation 2 and change the sign of H2. Now add equation 1 to the new equation 2 and add H1 to the reversed equation 2 for delta Hf for the ...
Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 2:36pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Reverse equation 2 and equation 3 and add them to equation 1. See if that isn't the equation you want. When you reverse an equation you change the sign for delta H for that reaction. Then add all of the DH values.
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 at 1:05am by DrBob222

chemistry
Add equation 1 to the reverse of equation 2, then add twice equation 3 and twice equation 4. Cancel atoms/molecules common to both sides and check to make sure you have the equation you want. Don't forget to change the sign of any delta H value for which the equation was ...
Thursday, October 29, 2009 at 7:59pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Label the equation you have as 1, 2, 3. Use equation 1 as is. Use equation 2 as is. Reverse equation 3 (change the sign of DH when you reverse an equation), than add all of them and the new DHs. Check to make sure the equation is what you wnat, the It will be DH(1) + DH(2...
Monday, October 25, 2010 at 2:30pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Reverse equation 1 and add to equation 2. That will give you the equation desired at the end. Reverse the sign for delta H when the equation is reversed.
Friday, February 18, 2011 at 12:36am by DrBob222

chemistry
Reverse equation 1 (change sign of delta H). Multiply equation 2 by 2. Add. Check the equation to make sure that's what you get.
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 at 10:37pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
I think what you want to do is multiply equation 1 by 2 and add to equation 2. I believe that will give you the equation you want. To find the Kp value, it will be (Kp1)^2*Kp2 = ?
Monday, March 5, 2012 at 10:14pm by DrBob222

chemistry
1. Write the balanced molecular equation. 2. Break each component into ions to obtain the complete ionic equation. 3. Cancel ions common to both sides of the equation to obtain the net equation.
Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 5:46pm by DrBob222

chemistry
write the balanced formula equation and the net ionic equation for the reaction of sodium hydroxide with hydrochloric acid. Formula equation.............. net equation.............
Sunday, October 30, 2011 at 7:40pm by denis

chemistry
Sorry, I meant to mention that all the Fe in the equation is Fe3+ (maybe that's obvious from the equation...). In which equation is the SCN not balanced? Mine or Kara's? And how did you get to this answer? Thank you so much.
Sunday, March 29, 2009 at 6:24pm by lholmq

Chemistry
For the equation give the formula equation, ionic equation, and the net ionic equation after predicting the products and balancing. Using the solubility rules to indicate solid or aqueous each formula. AgNO3 + NaCl
Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at 12:50pm by Cindy

Chemistry - Le Chatelier's Principle
I don't know what it is you don't understand. Frankly you seem to understand it very well. You add H3O^+ and the rxn shifts to the right producing more dichromate which is what you want. The equation is already there. That is the initial equation, the intermediate equation, ...
Sunday, March 9, 2014 at 1:30pm by DrBob222

AP Chemistry
What is meant by minimum and maximum energy problems. Are there different equations to find them. What does this conceptually mean? * This is dealing with quantum chemistry such as plancks equation, and debroglie equation.
Thursday, November 18, 2010 at 10:48pm by qwerty123

chemistry(balance equation)
hi!i am a f4 student in hk.i have know the basic concept of balance equation.but some too complex equation i cant balance.is there any general short cut for balancing any simple or complex chemical equation?
Thursday, January 19, 2012 at 10:50am by kate

chemistry
Start with the end equation. FeO(s) + CO(g) ==> Fe(s) + CO2(g) I want an Fe(s) on the right and CO2(g) on the right. The first equation has that so write that one as is (at least for the time being). I would reverse equations 2 and 3 and multiply equation 1 by 3, equation 2...
Wednesday, March 26, 2008 at 10:08pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Take 1/2 equation 1, add to 1/2 equation 3, add to equation 2 to get the equation you want. K for that reaction is (sqrt k1) x (sqrt k3) x k2
Sunday, March 31, 2013 at 10:54am by DrBob222

Chemistry
In chemistry you can, with the help of a balanced chemical equation, convert anything to anything. The coefficients in the balanced equation are used for that purpose. First, the equation you wrote is not balanced. The proper equation is C6H12O6 + 6O2 ==> 6CO2 + 6H2O ?mols ...
Sunday, January 27, 2013 at 11:26am by DrBob222

chemistry 101
Add equation 1 to the reverse of equation 2 to obtain the reaction you want. dH for the new reaction is dH for equation 1 + the negative dH (which will make is positive) for equation 2.
Sunday, April 29, 2012 at 2:36pm by DrBob222

chemistry
What kind of a balanced equation are you talking about? You can have the balanced CHEMICAL equation, you can have the balanced MATH equation, or the balanced HEAT equation. I'll assume you want the chemical equation; I also assume that this is the first of several questions. ...
Monday, March 26, 2012 at 4:32pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Write the molecular equation, the complete ionic equation, and the net ionic equation for the reaction of barium hydroxide with sodium nitrate.
Wednesday, November 23, 2011 at 9:13pm by Jane

chemistry
write the balanced molecular equation, the complete ionic equation and the net ionic equation. copper(2) sulfate and 10% sodium hydroxide
Tuesday, April 12, 2011 at 12:37am by Anonymous07

Chemistry
It is not d. Reverse equation 1 (and the sign of DH) and add to equation 2 and see if you don't get the sublimation equation. N2O5(s) ==> N2O5(g)
Sunday, July 25, 2010 at 11:06pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Add equation 1 to the reverse of equation 3 and I believe that will give you equation 2. Then add 792 to -198 to find the missing H.
Tuesday, April 10, 2012 at 3:17pm by DrBob222

Chemistry HELP!
I don't understand the question. What you have written IS (emphasize IS) the word equation. Should you be asking, "What is the chemical equation for the following word equation? or have I missed the point of the whole thing? The BALANCED chemical equation is 2H2O ==> 2H2 + ...
Tuesday, March 11, 2008 at 4:30pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
None unless you do it right? Do you have an equation? Writ and balance the equation. Using the coefficients in the balanced equation, convert moles O2 to moles Br2.
Monday, March 15, 2010 at 8:48pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
No. Sublimation is changing from solid to gas. Reverse equation 1 and add to equation 2. You should get N2O5(s) ==> N2O5(g), then reverse kJ for equation 1 and add to equation 2.
Saturday, July 24, 2010 at 8:15pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
I am having a bit of difficulty getting the net equation and the net ionic equation and the net ionic equation. I think I have the balance equation right. Thanks in advance for any help. For the acid base neutralization reaction of carbonic acid, H2CO3(aq), and lithium ...
Thursday, March 4, 2010 at 9:24pm by Amanda

Chemistry
For the NH4Br equation, do you understand the molecular equation I wrote. If so, I can give you the details on how we go from the molecular to the net ionic equation. The carbonate is tougher to explain on the boards like this.
Friday, April 24, 2009 at 10:29pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
What is the overall equation, the complete ionic equation, and the net ionic equation for the reaction that occurs when aqueous solutions of cobalt (II) bromide and sodium hydroxide are mixed?
Monday, March 21, 2011 at 5:39pm by Shay

Chemistry II
I didn't get either answer. Look at your equation to make sure it adds to the desired equation in the problem. Here is what I did. equation 1 x 2 equation 2 reversed and x 2. equation 3 x 3. Add it. First look at the equation. (2N2) + 2O2 + 4NH3 + (6H2) +3O2 ==> (2N2) + + (...
Sunday, November 29, 2009 at 6:37pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
The first equation you have written goes the other direction;i.e., it should be written as 2KOH + H2SO4 ==> 2H2O + K2SO4. The second (ionic equation) is ok and the net equation is ok.
Sunday, January 13, 2008 at 9:57am by drbob222

chemistry
Use equation 1, reverse equation 2, multiply equation 3 by 3 and multiply equation 4 by 3. Add them. Don't forget to reverse the sign of equations you reverse.
Saturday, September 19, 2009 at 11:33pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
What do I do when writing the net ionic equation for Magnesium nitrate reacted with sodium chloride? I've wrote out the molecular equation and the total ionic equation. Everything cancels out....under my total ionic equation do i just write no reaction? |thanks!
Wednesday, January 19, 2011 at 6:35pm by Jack

Chemistry
I think you multiply equation 1 by 4. Reverse equation 3 and multiply by 2. Add in equation 2 multiplied by 6.
Monday, May 13, 2013 at 2:37pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Write a balanced chemical equation (molecular equation). Write a total ionic equation. write a net ionic equation. (NH4)2 SO4(aq)+Na2CO3(aq) -->
Tuesday, March 15, 2011 at 9:52pm by Jake

chemistry
I don't think so. Let's see how it plays out. I'll go through some of it and let you finish. 3Fe2O3 at top left cancels with 3Fe2O3 on right in equation 2. 2Fe3O4 on left in equation 2 cancels with 2Fe3O4 on right of equation 3. Then 9CO in equation 1(left side) cancels with 1...
Wednesday, March 26, 2008 at 10:08pm by DrBob222

chemistry
I assume those strange symbols stand for delta H. Write equation 1 as is. Reverse equation 2 and add to 1. Take 1/2 of equation 3 and reverse it; add to the other two. When you reverse an equation you change the sign of delta H. If you take 1/2 of an equation you take 1/2 ...
Saturday, March 26, 2011 at 9:13pm by DrBob222

chemistry
I was working on it when the phone range about an hour ago. Use equation 1 as is. Reverse equation 2, multiply it by 2 (change the sign of delta H for equation 2 also and multiply it by 2) then add the two equtions. That will give you twice the equation you want, so divide all...
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 8:34pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
That is what I thought was the answer. I am taking classes online and each time I put the equation in the chemPad it tells me "Your answer contains an ambiguous or incomplete reaction equation. Check all the components on the product-side of the equation."
Saturday, June 9, 2012 at 2:08pm by Jamie

Chemistry
You really need to be more careful with your typing. I have an excuse when I make typos and omit characters; I'm old and can't see very well. You don't have that excuse. You're in a hurry. You can't hurry your way through chemistry. :-). Equation 1 has dH = -109 kJ. Look at ...
Saturday, October 26, 2013 at 11:04pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Multiply equation 1 by 1 and equation 2 by 2, add them together and add the delta H for each. (When you add the two multiplied equations, check to make sure the items you don't want cancel and leaves the equation desired.)
Wednesday, December 10, 2008 at 11:06pm by DrBob222

chemistry
I looked only at #1. Seven prolems per post is six too many. Do you have any idea how long it takes to work and type in the answers? Too long. Most volunteers will not tackle one that takes that long to answer. If you will note, equation 1 reversed + equation 2 times 3/2 will ...
Monday, July 5, 2010 at 7:40pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Two questions. 1. The equation isn't balanced as a molecular equation; therefore, one can't take this one and convert to an ionic equation. 2. Do you intend for CuCl3 as a reactant. That gives Cu in a +3 oxidation state which isn't impossible but likely improbable.
Monday, October 4, 2010 at 12:02pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Look up Hess' Law. Multiply equation 1 by 2 and add it to equation 2. Multiply delta H for equation 1 by 2 and add to delta H for equation 2.
Tuesday, March 3, 2009 at 1:05pm by DrBob222

chemistry
During combustion, methine yeilds carbon dioxide and water. the unbalanced equation for this reaction is : CH4(g)+O2(g)>CO2(g)+H2O(i) what will the mole ratios for the balanced equation be?(what coefficients are needed in order to balanced the equation?)
Wednesday, December 14, 2011 at 10:05pm by Meteknesh

chemistry
Use equation 1 as is. Use equation 2, take 1/2 of it and reverse the equation. The new K will be (1/sqrtK2. Krxn for the reaction will be K1*(1/sqrtK2) Then delta Go = -RT*lnKrxn
Monday, May 3, 2010 at 12:42pm by DrBob222

College Chemistry
I balanced the equation: HBr(aq) +NH3(aq)->NH4Br I need to find the ionic equation and the net ionic equation
Sunday, October 3, 2010 at 4:55pm by KELLY

Chemistry (Enthalpy)-College
Use equation 1 as is. Reverse equation 2 (change the sign) and add to equation 1. Add the delta Hs to arrive at the total delta H for the new reaction.
Sunday, October 31, 2010 at 7:10pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
That looks good to me for the full molecular equation. Change that to the full ionic equation, then the net ionic equation. KOH should be separated into ions as well as KC2H3O2.
Friday, May 13, 2011 at 9:42pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
I think what you want to do is to reverse the equation, calculate the new Kc, then using that reversed equation convert the new Kc to Kp. That would be for the equation CO + Cl2 ==> 2COCl2
Thursday, March 15, 2012 at 9:55pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
No. The net ionic equation starts with the molecular equation, changes to an ionic equation, then to the NET ionic equation. In this case, however, I don't think there is any reaction. Ag2SO4 is insoluble to begin with. Mg(NO3)2(aq) + Ag2SO4 ==> No reaction.
Tuesday, November 20, 2007 at 9:53pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Phosphoric acid and barium hydroxide solutions mix to form water and solid barium phosphate. Write the word equation, skeletal equation, and the balanced equation for this word problem.
Wednesday, March 3, 2010 at 9:20pm by Joe

chemistry
Your target equation is not apparent from your post; however, if the target equation is the first one in the post, adding the other three will not get the equation you want.
Monday, October 25, 2010 at 2:30pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Write a balanced equation. Here's the equation. Balance the equation yourself. C4H10 + O2 -> CO2 + H2O At STP, 1 mol = 22.4L. Use this to convert L to mol butane. Use stoichiometry to solve this problem. Steps 1-3. http://www.jiskha.com/science/chemistry/stoichiometry.html
Friday, May 20, 2011 at 10:06pm by TutorCat

Science (Chemistry)
. Complete all the following for the reaction (NH4)2S + Cd(NO3)2 --> CdS(s) + NH4NO3 1. Balance this equation 2. Write the ionic equation 3. Write the net ionic equation
Friday, March 14, 2014 at 10:00pm by Anonymous

Chemistry
what is the balanced formula equation, complete ionic equation, and net ionic equation FeSO4(aq) + KCl(aq)
Friday, October 26, 2007 at 8:25am by Anonymous

Chemistry
Equation 2 is 3x that of 1; therefore, the heat released is 3x450 J. Equation 3 is 1/3 of the reversed equation 1; therefore, the heat absorbed is 1/3 x 450J.
Saturday, March 31, 2012 at 4:20pm by DrBob222

chemistry
I don't know what Ero stands for but these are reduction potentials you have written. Multiply equation 2 by 2, reverse it, add to equn 1, and eliminate ions common to both sides (for example you can eliminate some of the OH and some of the H2O) and that will be the net ionic ...
Wednesday, August 3, 2011 at 12:18pm by Drbob222

Chemistry
Check that. I made a big typo. The manganese half equation is multiplied by 2 and the CH3OH/CH2O half equation is multiplied by 5. The equation is wrote is balanced, both with atoms and with charge but I mistyped the coefficients in the explanation.
Monday, February 18, 2008 at 2:24pm by DrBob222

Inorganic chemistry
If you add equation 1 to the reverse of equation 2, you will get the equation you want. I believe you can use nFEo = RT*ln k to calculate Eo for the half cell as you have it written, then reverse it and add to Eo for equation 1 to obtain 2E for the half cell you want. Check my...
Saturday, April 11, 2009 at 10:18pm by DrBob222

chemistry
No. The coefficients in the equation will tell you. Have you written the balanced equation?
Tuesday, July 29, 2008 at 12:09pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Start with the equation and mols. The equation gives you values at STP.
Sunday, March 17, 2013 at 7:38pm by DrBob222

chemistry
The net ionic equation is The equation above is the molecular equation (but it isn't balanced because the SCN is not balanced). The net ionic equation is Fe^+3 + SCN^- ==> FeSCN^+2
Sunday, March 29, 2009 at 6:24pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
but what equation is used to find it? the delta H/RT equation won't solve for anything
Wednesday, June 25, 2008 at 4:18pm by Sophie

chemistry
So when you wrote the balanced equation, how did you know that you had to add O2 in the equation? Thanks, sorry for the trouble
Thursday, September 5, 2013 at 7:50pm by K

Chemistry for Bob
You want me to do your work for you. I don't know what trouble you're having but you need to learn to do it yourself. It's a simple matter of writing the equation, which I posted, and substituting the numbers. Substituting into the equation can't be THAT hard to do. The only ...
Monday, March 15, 2010 at 7:24pm by DrBob222

chemistry 101
Are you sure that equation 1 is correct? It isn't balanced. I think it should be 2NOCl ==> N2 + O2 + Cl2 To get that equation, multiply equation 2 by 2 and reverse it (multiply delta H by 2 and change the sign). Multiply equation 3 by 2 and reverse it (multiply delta H by 2...
Tuesday, October 27, 2009 at 8:45pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Look at the equation. The equation tells you that 1 mole SrH2 will form 2 moles H2.
Tuesday, September 14, 2010 at 10:45pm by DrBob222

College Chemistry- Hess's Law
Multiply equation 2 by 2 and reverse it. Add in equation 1. That will give you what you want.
Friday, October 22, 2010 at 8:43pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Find the product for the equation and then write a balanced equation. Cl2 + FeBr3 -> ?
Sunday, January 15, 2012 at 1:05pm by Zoe

Chemistry
What is the complete balanced equation for this partial equation? Mg(s) + HCl(aq) → ?
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 at 5:00pm by Shea

Cosmology
The equation describing the geometry and mass-energy distribution of a homogeneous and isotropic universe is known as: - The Einstein Equation - The Friedmann Equation - The Robertson-Walker Equation - The Hubble Equation
Tuesday, January 8, 2013 at 8:13pm by qwerty

Chemistry
1. Write a balanced equation for the neutralization equation.
Wednesday, August 11, 2010 at 4:19am by stacy

chemistry
I don't know which equation you are using; the source of the oxygen is H2O2 in either. I don't think the first equation is valid.
Thursday, March 31, 2011 at 11:13am by DrBob222

Chemistry
What is the chemical equation for: CuI + NH4OH ---> ??? This equation should oxidise Cu+ to Cu2+.
Saturday, March 13, 2010 at 12:14pm by Alan

chemistry
I don't know that you do. The only thing I would do is to convert the word equation to the corresponding chemical equation, then balance that.
Thursday, March 1, 2012 at 6:36pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Sorry the equation is: Cr2O7^2- + I- ---> Cr^3+ + IO3^- (dont sure the balanced equation)
Monday, June 17, 2013 at 4:41pm by Annie

chemistry
We are determining the molarity of HCl by titration of HCl. What would be the complete equation and the net ionic equation? THanks What are you titrating it with? Won't that make a difference in the equation we write? It's titration of HCl with NaOH. molecular equation: HCl + ...
Sunday, September 17, 2006 at 4:00pm by bria

chemistry
Use equation 1 as is. (delta H as is) Add 2x equation 2 (and 2x delta H). Reverse equation 3 and add to the other two (change the sign on delta H). Then added the equations as noted and confirm you obtain the desired equation; finally, add the delta Hs (with changes as noted).
Tuesday, November 23, 2010 at 4:52pm by DrBob222

chemistry
Add equation 1 to the reverse of equation 2 and you will obtain the reaction you want. Change the sign of delta H for equation 2 (since it is reversed) and add it to delta H for equation 1 to obtain delta H for the desired reaction.
Tuesday, October 27, 2009 at 2:34pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
hi I'm having a serious problem with balancing chemical equations , can someone explain to me how we can do them also if i had a word equation hhow can i convert it into a symbolic equation and balance it e.g can someone show me how we do this equation: KOH3+HNO3 ---}( what's ...
Monday, December 24, 2007 at 6:58am by Simon Lodge

Chemistry
hi I'm having a serious problem with balancing chemical equations , can someone explain to me how we can do them also if i had a word equation hhow can i convert it into a symbolic equation and balance it e.g can someone show me how we do this equation: KOH3+HNO3 ---}( what's ...
Monday, December 24, 2007 at 7:05am by Simon Lodge

Chemistry
Can someone balance this equation using the half-reaction equation method? OF2 + I^- ----> F^- + I3^-
Thursday, February 21, 2008 at 9:15pm by Anonymous

Chemistry-Please help
You know the ideal PV = nRT equation, and you know van der Waals equation. Plug and chug.
Friday, October 16, 2009 at 1:33pm by DrBob222

chemistry
The unbalance equation would be Fe(OH)3 ---> Fe2O3 + H2O still working on the balance equation
Tuesday, October 4, 2011 at 9:21pm by Broy

Chemistry
Add equn 1 to the reverse of equation 2. K1 = 1.6 K2 for the reversed equation is 1/0.67 K for the reaction is K1K2
Saturday, March 31, 2012 at 9:22pm by DrBob222

chemistry
You are being asked to transform a word equation into a chemical equation. You do this for every problem you work in chemistry. sulfur dioxide + water = sulfurous acid SO2 + H2O ==> H2SO3 SO2 is the anhydride of sulfurous acid.
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 5:58pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
write the balance equation. Determine the moles of H2 (from PV=nRT). Use the coefficents of the balanced equation to determine how many moles of ammonia are made. I assume you are just starting chemistry, in reality, it is much more complicated that this, as that reaction does...
Monday, April 5, 2010 at 8:52pm by bobpursley

chemistry
I think you made a typo. I believe you meant Cu(NO3)2. 1. Write the balanced molecular equation. 2. Break each component into ions to obtain the complete ionic equation. 3. Cancel ions common to each side to arrive at the net ionic equation.
Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 5:09pm by DrBob222

chemistry
oh okay well i had my balanced equation like this C3H8 + 5O2 --> 3CO2 + 42O so what should be changed for my equation?
Thursday, January 22, 2009 at 8:32pm by lyne

Chemistry
Write the balanced equation and compare the coefficients in the equation. 3Ca(OH)2 + 2H3PO4 ==> Ca3(PO4)3 + 6H2O
Saturday, September 19, 2009 at 10:02pm by DrBob222

Chemistry
Look up that equation, nEF = -lnK (I'm not at home and can't confirm that equation so check it out) but that is the one you want to use.
Wednesday, December 2, 2009 at 8:27am by DrBob222P

chemistry
The Rydberg equation (1=Rni 2–Rnf 2) can be treated as a line equation. What is the value of nf as a function of the slope (m) and y-intercept(b)?
Monday, January 18, 2010 at 4:40pm by sara

chemistry
If you have had work with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, you should use that equation. There are other ways to do it but they are longer.
Tuesday, March 9, 2010 at 11:54am by DrBob222

Chemistry
The Rydberg equation (1=Rni 2–Rnf 2) can be treated as a line equation. What is the value of nf as a function of the slope (m) and y-intercept(b)?
Monday, April 12, 2010 at 6:57pm by Christian

Chemistry
Why would potassium no longer appear in the equation of a net ionic equation with KIO3 being the oxidizing agent?
Tuesday, April 20, 2010 at 2:16pm by Teel

chemistry
How do I balance this equation. Give the complete or "molecular" equation for the predicted partner exchange reaction. FeCl3 and NH3
Monday, September 12, 2011 at 1:57am by Anonymous

Chemistry
2KOH + H2CO3 ==> K2CO3 + 2H2O is the balanced molecular equation. Can you convert to the net ionic equation?
Saturday, October 22, 2011 at 4:59pm by DrBob222

chemistry
How do you calculate deltaHf using the # of moles from a balanced equation? How do you connect the Law of Conservation of Energy to a Thermochemical Equation? Thanks so much!
Monday, April 29, 2013 at 11:40pm by K

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