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April 23, 2014

Search: Astrophysics

Number of results: 38

Astrophysics
What is d? What is s?
Wednesday, October 29, 2008 at 8:04pm by bobpursley

astrophysics
You're very welcome!
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by MathMate

Astrophysics
d is distance and s is speed
Wednesday, October 29, 2008 at 8:04pm by anonymous

Astrophysics
Oh, yes, yes. This is explained in my book; I just didn't remember this formula or think to apply it to this problem. Thank you so much!
Monday, July 19, 2010 at 4:17pm by Sheena

Science
Astrophysics Quantum mechanics Information management systems Google: The SETI institute, look at their members degrees.
Thursday, February 7, 2013 at 5:52pm by Ken

Physics - solar power in space
Sorry, not my field, but hopefully one of the tutorials in this GOOGLE Search will help you: http://www.google.com/search?q=astrophysics+tutorial&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a Sra
Wednesday, March 4, 2009 at 3:42am by SraJMcGin

Psychology
Math is a language, pure and simple. In fact, is it the language of physics and astrophysics.
Monday, August 23, 2010 at 7:57pm by bobpursley

astrophysics
Multiple post. Please see the next post. Sra
Thursday, November 26, 2009 at 1:46am by SraJMcGin

astrophysics
It ain't that easy to extrapolate from single-electron atomic spectra to the spectra of polyatomics and molecules. Applicatuion of quantum mechanics becomes exceedingly messy. The 21 cm line of hydrogen is due to a spin flip of its single electron. Oxygen has a much more ...
Saturday, March 5, 2011 at 4:20pm by drwls

astrophysics
ty so much for the help..for the 1st 1 i got the same answer...but y did u use pir^2 for the second 1 and 4pir^2 for the 1st 1??
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by Easha

astrophysics
yeah...i got it..ty sooo much...i can do the rest i guess..but i have any problem with any other questions...i'll post it..!...ty once agn!!:D
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by Easha

astrophysics
These are exercises in using the inverse square law of luminosity and the blackbody law of thermal radiation. You will be helped if you first make an effort and show your work.
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 10:12pm by drwls

space
Space science is an all-encompassing term that describes all of the various science fields that are concerned with the study of the Universe, generally also meaning "excluding the Earth" and "outside of the Earth's atmosphere". Originally, all of these fields were considered ...
Tuesday, September 22, 2009 at 8:06pm by sara

astrophysics
If the wavelength of Hydrogen is 21.10611405413 cm, what is the wavelength of oxygen in cm?
Saturday, March 5, 2011 at 4:20pm by james

Astrophysics
If an eclipsing binary system has a period of 32 days, an orbital velocity of 153km/s, and an orbit that is nearly edge-on, what is the circumference of the orbit? The radius of the orbit? The mass of the system? I can't seem to find a starting point for this problem.
Monday, July 19, 2010 at 4:17pm by Sheena

science
I dont know if there are only five. I have friends in biophysics, astrophysics, astronomy, high energy physics, condensed matter physics, nuclear energy, and physics education. Most engineering is applied physics.
Wednesday, August 29, 2007 at 8:17pm by Bobpursley

astrophysics
yea...i figured that out earlier..my answer was in degree (as the calculator was in degree mode)...but i took the answer to be in radian then i converted that to degree...which is completely wrong...its 2.18arc mins now...ty sooo much for all ur help!!
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by Easha

astrophysics
Mars has a mean density less than the mean density of the Earth's mantle. How is it possible that Mars could have a metallic core given this fact? Hint: No calculations are required. Compare the densities used in part a) with the density of mantle rocks like basalt at one ...
Thursday, November 26, 2009 at 1:46am by cosmos

Astrophysics
Well it's definitely a main sequence star since it's F7V (V--> main sequence, right?) but I'm a bit confused about how to find the luminosity (and thus the absolute magnitude) from the b-v index, all the H-R diagrams in our book are luminosity vs surface temperature. I cant...
Tuesday, February 2, 2010 at 11:49am by O_o Rion

astrophysics
sry to disturb u 1ce agn..but i had another problem related to galilean moons...i thot i would just post the question in case u can help me...i have done it...i just want to check my answer!!.. What is the largest angle that can separate Ganymede from Europa from the point of ...
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by Easha

astrophysics
4πr² is the surface area of an imaginary sphere in which the sun is at the centre. The energy output of the sun divided by this surface area represents the intensity of the sun's rays at the given radius. For the second problem, we are to calculate the sun's energy ...
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by MathMate

Astrophysics
Star Power and Temperature Star A and Star B Consider two stars that are the same size (they have the same diameter), but have different surface temperatures. Letís say Star Aís temperature is 3000 K and Star Bís temperature is 4500 K. Letís look at the ratio of Star Bís ...
Tuesday, October 9, 2012 at 4:17pm by Lisa

Astrophysics
Use an H-R diagram (not an equation) for part a. That will tell you the mass M and the absolute magnitude, assuming it is a main sequence star. Stars of that spectral class usually are. Once you have m(absolute), you can use the distance to get m(apparent). It seems to me that...
Tuesday, February 2, 2010 at 11:49am by drwls

Physical Science
Physics + Chemistry = Physical Chemistry Biology + Chemistry = Biochemistry Organic Chemistry+Geology + Chemistry = Geochemistry Astronomy + Physics = Astrophysics Biology + Geology = Paleontology Geology + Astronomy = Astrogeology Biology + Astronomy + Physics = Astronautics
Friday, June 15, 2012 at 6:48am by Elena

astrophysics
Your method of calculations is correct and would have results that agree with mine except for two little things: 1. "distance between jupiter and europa= 6710000 km " The number has an extra zero (probably a transcription error for posting only). It does not change your answer...
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by MathMate

Astrophysics
You know M(r) = v^2r /G d = distance; s= speed Planet 1: d=2/s=120 Planet 2: d=4/s=60 Planet 3: d=9/s=40 Planet 4: d=16/s=30 Planet 5: d=36/s = 20 You use the distance and orbital speed of the first planet to determine the mass enclosed within the orbit of the first planet to ...
Wednesday, October 29, 2008 at 8:04pm by anonymous

half-life
U-238 has a half-life of 4.46 x 109 years. Estimates of the age of the universe range from 9 x 109 years to 23 x 109 years (Cauldrons in the Cosmos: Nuclear Astrophysics, C.E. Rolfs and W.S. Rodney, Univ. of Chicago, 1988, p. 477). What fraction of this isotope present at the ...
Wednesday, February 7, 2007 at 5:43pm by Jeje

Astrophysics
I'm having trouble understanding the formulas for determining a planet's distance and mass. A planet's distance is related to the period of revolution and the mass of the central star (e.g, the sun). The relationship is called Kepler's Third law. Distance can also be ...
Monday, September 18, 2006 at 9:08am by Judy

Astrophysics
(a) From the absorption lines, we were able to determine that the star (phi)-Fictus has spectral classification F7V and color index B-V=0/48. What is the mass M(phi) of the star in solar masses? (b) Spectroscopic parallax, when corrected for reddening, yields a distance of 4.5...
Tuesday, February 2, 2010 at 11:49am by O_o Rion

unsolved mysteries astrophysics
Q3.2 COLLAPSE TIMESCALE (5 points possible) Imagine that you live in a distant galaxy far far away. This galaxy is in a different universe, and so may have different cosmology. It seems that in this distant universe, all galaxies have the same luminosity, which you have worked...
Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 10:39pm by JuanPro

astrophysics
what i did was.. distance between earth and jupiter= 4.20 AU= 6.30*10^8 km distance between jupiter and europa= 6710000 km distance between jupiter and ganymede= 1070000 km then i found the angles subtended by jupiter and europa, x (from earth viewpoint) since earth and europa...
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by Easha

Astrophysics
If the orbital velocity is a constant (in this case 153 km/s), the orbit of each star about the center of mass must be circular. You need to specify which of the stars has an orbital velocity of 153 km/s. Unless the stars have equal mass, they will move at different velocities...
Monday, July 19, 2010 at 4:17pm by drwls

Astrophysics
The Earth formed at a redshift of z∼0.53. That means that when our world was young, the universe was quite a bit smaller than it is today. The nearest galaxies to our own are around 10 kpc (kilo-parsecs) in size, lie at a distance of around 1 Mpc from us (Mega-parsecs), ...
Saturday, April 12, 2014 at 1:30am by Anonymous

astrophysics
P = The Sun's power output is therefore 3.90*10^26 Watts. D1 = distance of the earth from the sun = 1 AU = 149,598,000,000 m D2 = distance of Saturn from the sun = 9.54 AU Surface area, S, of a sphere of radius r =4πr² a. For Saturn, R2=9.54 AU =9.54*149,598,000,000 m ...
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by MathMate

astrophysics
1) Every second the Sun outputs 3.90* 10^26 Joules of energy. Power is energy output per unit time and is given in units of Watts (W) where 1 W = 1 Joule per second. The Sun's power output is therefore 3.90*10^26 Watts. This is called the solar luminosity. As this energy ...
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 10:12pm by Easha

astrophysics
1) Every second the Sun outputs 3.90* 10^26 Joules of energy. Power is energy output per unit time and is given in units of Watts (W) where 1 W = 1 Joule per second. The Sun's power output is therefore 3.90*10^26 Watts. This is called the solar luminosity. As this energy ...
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by Easha

astrophysics
The angle subtended by the moon from earth is 3474.8/384403 radians=0.00904 radians=0.52°! You may have an error with units. Perhaps you calculated the number of minutes (and not degrees). The angle subtended in radians, i.e. transverse distance divided by longitudinal ...
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 9:09pm by MathMate

Physics - solar power in space
Hi, this requires some basic knowledge of astrophysics. I missed last lecture that covered this, so though I'd prefer thorough solutions to these problems, I'd appreciate it even if you could tell me which formulas to use to solve each part of the problem. Thanks! NASAís Mars ...
Wednesday, March 4, 2009 at 3:42am by Mark

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