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July 29, 2014

Search: Astronauts use a centrifuge to simulate the acceleration of a rocket launch. The centrifuge takes 40.0 to speed up from rest to its top speed of 1 rotation every 1.20 . The astronaut is strapped into a seat 4.00 from the axis

Number of results: 37,826

Physics (Circular Motion!!)
Astronauts use a centrifuge to simulate the acceleration of a rocket launch. The centrifuge takes 30.0 s to speed up from rest to its top speed of 1 rotation every 1.10 s. the astronaut is strapped into a seat 7.40 m from the axis. A) What is the astronaut's tangential ...
September 2, 2010 by George

Physics
Astronauts use a centrifuge to simulate the acceleration of a rocket launch. The centrifuge takes 40.0s to speed up from rest to its top speed of 1 rotation every 1.40s . The astronaut is strapped into a seat 4.50m from the axis. What is the astronaut's tangential acceleration...
February 7, 2011 by Fred

PHYSICS
To simulate the extreme accelerations during launch, astronauts train in a large centrifuge. If the centrifuge diameter is 13.5m , what should be its rotation period to produce a centripetal acceleration of If the centrifuge diameter is 13.5m , what should be its rotation ...
September 14, 2013 by Amy

physics
To simulate the extreme accelerations during launch, astronauts train in a large centrifuge. If the centrifuge diameter is 13.5m , what should be its rotation period to produce a centripetal acceleration of If the centrifuge diameter is 13.5m , what should be its rotation ...
September 14, 2013 by Amy

PHYSICS!!!
To simulate the extreme accelerations during launch, astronauts train in a large centrifuge. If the centrifuge diameter is 13.5m , what should be its rotation period to produce a centripetal acceleration of If the centrifuge diameter is 13.5m , what should be its rotation ...
September 14, 2013 by Amy

Physics
Futurists project large space stations which would rotate so as to use centripetal acceleration to simulate gravity. The outer wall of the rotating space station would become a floor for the astronauts, and centripetal acceleration supplied by the floor would allow astronauts ...
June 8, 2014 by Anonymous

physics
You are designing a centrifuge to spin at a rate of 13,880 rev/min. (a) Calculate the maximum centripetal acceleration that a test-tube sample held in the centrifuge arm 14.6 cm from the rotation axis must withstand. (b) It takes 1 min, 17 s for the centrifuge to spin up to ...
August 31, 2011 by lindsey

Physics
(b)A centrifuge has a maximum rotation rate of 10,000 rpm and can be stopped in 4 seconds. Assume the deceleration is uniform. The centrifuge radius is 8 cm. (i)What is the average angular acceleration of the centrifuge?       (2%) (ii)What is the distance that a point on the ...
August 12, 2010 by Oisin

Physics
A centrifuge takes 100 s to spin up from rest to its final angular speed with constant angular acceleration. If a point located 8.00 cm from the axis of rotation of the centrifuge moves with a speed of 150 m/s when the centrifuge is at full speed, how many revolutions does the...
June 24, 2012 by Bloom

Physics
The frequency of a centrifuge is 60 Hz and its radius is 0.15 m. What is the centripetal acceleration of an object in the centrifuge at a distance of 0.15 m from the center?
September 23, 2013 by ss01

Physics
Astronauts who spend long periods in outer space could be adversely affected by weightlessness. One way to simulate gravity is to shape the spaceship like a cylindrical shell that rotates, with the astronauts walking on the inside surface. Explain how this simulates gravity. ...
November 1, 2009 by Sasha

Physics
A centrifuge is spinning at 3600 rev/min, and when turned off, it rotates 50 times before coming to a stop. A) What is the initial angular velocity? B) What is the angle (in radians) that the centrifuge passes through before stopping? C) What is the angular acceleration? D) ...
March 5, 2008 by Mike

Physics
A centrifuge is spinning at 3600 rev/min, and when turned off, it rotates 50 times before coming to a stop. A) What is the initial angular velocity? B) What is the angle (in radians) that the centrifuge passes through before stopping? C) What is the angular acceleration? D) ...
March 5, 2008 by Mike

Physics
An advertisement claims that a centrifuge can produce a radial acceleration of 3,524g at 4,608 rev/min. Calculate the required radius of the centrifuge.
April 6, 2008 by Charlie

Physics
How to solve? 2. A 70.0 kg astronaut is training for accelerations that he will experience upon reentry. He is placed in a centrifuge (r = 10.0 m) and spun at a constant angular velocity of 16.3 rpm. Answer the following: a. What is the angular velocity of the centrifuge in ...
May 20, 2014 by Josh

physics help ; )
1.(a)A centrifuge accelerates from rest with an angular acceleration of 30rad/s^2.What is the angular velocity of the centrifuge after 30s?(b)The angular velocity of an auto mobile engine accelerates from 800rpm to 3000rpm in 15s.calaculate the engines angular acceleration. ...
November 14, 2006 by stefani

physics
A laboratory centrifuge on earth makes n rpm and produces an acceleration of 3.20 g at its outer end. A) What is the acceleration (in g's, i.e., acceleration divided by g) at a point halfway out to the end? B) This centrifuge is now used in a space capsule on the planet ...
November 26, 2010 by Steph

physics
A couple of astronauts agree to rendezvous in space after hours. Their plan is to let gravity bring them together. She has a mass of 66.0 kg and he a mass of 72.0 kg, and they start from rest 25.0 m apart. 1)Find his initial acceleration. 2)Find her initial acceleration. 3)If ...
February 15, 2012 by HH

physics
As their booster rockets separate, Space Shuttle astronauts typically feel accelerations up to 3g, where g = 9.80 m/s2. In their training, astronauts ride in a device where they experience such an acceleration as a centripetal acceleration. Specifically, the astronaut is ...
February 17, 2011 by kia

phy
As their booster rockets separate, Space Shuttle astronauts typically feel accelerations up to 3g, where g = 9.80 m/s2. In their training, astronauts ride in a device where they experience such an acceleration as a centripetal acceleration. Specifically, the astronaut is ...
February 17, 2011 by kia

Physics
We saw in Example 5.7 how a centrifuge can be used to separate cells from a liquid. To increase the speed at which objects can be separated from solution, it is useful to make the centrifuge’s speed as large as possible. If you want to design a centrifuge of diameter 68 cm to ...
September 20, 2011 by Rose

PHYSICS HELP
A couple of astronauts agree to rendezvous in space after hours. Their plan is to let gravity bring them together. She has a mass of 66.0 kg and he a mass of 72.0 kg, and they start from rest 25.0 m apart. A)Find his initial acceleration. i put 7.68* 10^-12 m/s^2 B)Find her ...
February 16, 2012 by Gina

physics
A centrifuge in a medical laboratory rotates at an angular speed of 3800 rev/min. When switched off, it rotates through 46.0 revolutions before coming to rest. Find the constant angular acceleration of the centrifuge. in 1 rad/s2
October 22, 2010 by john

physics
A centrifuge in a medical laboratory rotates at an angular speed of 3500 rev/min. When switched off, it rotates through 54.0 revolutions before coming to rest. Find the constant angular acceleration of the centrifuge in rad/s^2.
November 28, 2010 by angie

physics
revolving astronomer are subjected to acceleration by force the centripetal force against the centrifuge the radius of the centrifuge is 10 M .Calculate centripetal force on an astronaunt of mass 9.9 KG?
January 15, 2014 by samra deme

Physics
Help with Physics homework Please and thank you!? I need help on these two questions. I'm not looking for the answer because I really need to learn how to do this on my own. But if someone could show me what equations to use to answer the steps in the questions and explain to ...
May 20, 2014 by Meagan

physics
A centrifuge takes 1 minute to turn through 20 complete revolutions before reaching it's final speed. What is the angular acceleration (assumed constant) and what was it's final angular speed in rpm? How do I solve this without knowing the radius of the centrifuge?
March 25, 2011 by Mark

physics
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) studies the physiological effects of large accelerations on astronauts. Some of these studies use a machine known as a centrifuge. This machine consists of a long arm, to one end of which is attached a chamber in which ...
November 7, 2012 by D

Physics
A typical laboratory centrifuge rotates at 4100 rpm. Test tubes have to be placed into a centrifuge very carefully because of the very large accelerations. (a) What is the acceleration at the end of a test tube that is 11 cm from the axis of rotation? dropped from a height of ...
October 7, 2012 by Mark

physics
A laboratory centrifuge on earth makes n rpm (rev/min) and produces an acceleration of 7.00 g at its outer end. What is the acceleration (in g's, i.e., acceleration divided by g) at a point halfway out to the end?
November 27, 2010 by jessica

physics
A laboratory centrifuge on earth makes n rpm (rev/min) and produces an acceleration of 7.00 g at its outer end. What is the acceleration (in g's, i.e., acceleration divided by g) at a point halfway out to the end?
November 27, 2010 by jessica

Physics
A centrifuge in a medical laboratory rotates at an angular speed of 3500 rpm (revolutions per minute). When switched off, it rotates 70.0 times before coming to rest. Find the constant angular acceleration of the centrifuge. (Assume the initial direction of rotation is the ...
October 14, 2010 by Gina

Physics HELP!
A centrifuge in a medical laboratory rotates at an angular speed of 3500 rev/ min. When switched off, it rotates through 41.0 revolutions before coming to rest. (a) Find the angular speed in rad/s. (b) Find the displacement in radians. (c) Find the constant angular ...
October 26, 2012 by Mel

Physics- Elena please help!!!!
A centrifuge in a medical laboratory rotates at an angular speed of 3500 rev/ min. When switched off, it rotates through 41.0 revolutions before coming to rest. (a) Find the angular speed in rad/s. (b) Find the displacement in radians. (c) Find the constant angular ...
October 29, 2012 by Tom

physics
A laboratory centrifuge on earth makes n rpm (rev/min) and produces an acceleration of 3.30 g at its outer end. This centrifuge is now used in a space capsule on the planet Mercury, where g mercury is 0.378 what it is on earth. How many rpm (in terms of n) should it make to ...
November 26, 2010 by bobjahng2

Physics
Engineers are trying to create artificial "gravity" in a ringshaped space station by spinning it like a centrifuge. The ring is 170 m in radius. How quickly must the space station turn in order to give the astronauts inside it apparent weights equal to their real weights at ...
February 11, 2011 by M

physics
Engineers are trying to create artificial "gravity" in a ringshaped space station by spinning it like a centrifuge. The ring is 120 m in radius. How quickly must the space station turn in order to give the astronauts inside it apparent weights equal to their real weights at ...
March 15, 2011 by olga

physics
1. A centrifuge in a medical laboratory rotates at an angular speed of 3650 rev/min. When switched off, it rotates through 50.0 revolutions before coming to rest. Find the constant angular acceleration of the centrifuge. 2. A ball of mass 0.120 kg is dropped from rest from a ...
July 6, 2008 by Elisa

Physics
Engineers are trying to create artificial "gravity" in a ring-shaped space station by spinning it like a centrifuge. The ring is 100m in radius. How quickly must the space station turn in order to give the astronauts inside it weights equal to their weights at the earth's ...
November 27, 2011 by Hayli

Physics
Engineers are trying to create artificial "gravity" in a ring-shaped space station by spinning it like a centrifuge. The ring is 100m in radius. How quickly must the space station turn in order to give the astronauts inside it weights equal to their weights at the earth's ...
November 27, 2011 by Hayli

physics
Suppose that three astronauts outside a spaceship decide to play catch. All the astronauts weigh the same on Earth and are equally strong. The first astronaut throws the second astronaut toward the third one and the game begins. Describe the motion of the astronauts as the ...
August 17, 2010 by Anonymous

Physics
A space station is shaped like a ring and rotates to simulate gravity. If the radius of the space station is 120 m, at what frequency must it rotate so that it simulates Earth's gravity? [Hint: The apparent weight of the astronauts must be the same as their weight on Earth.]
March 6, 2010 by Max

Physics
A centrifuge can be used to separate cells from a liquid. To increase the rate at which objects can be separated from solution, it is useful to make the centrifuge's speed as large as possible. If you want to design a centrifuge of diameter 1.4 m to have a force of 128,000 ...
June 14, 2013 by Jody

Physics
(b)A centrifuge has a maximum rotation rate of 10,000 rpm and can be stopped in 4 seconds. Assume the deceleration is uniform. The centrifuge radius is 8 cm. What is the distance that a point on the rim travels during deceleration?
August 9, 2010 by Oisin

physics
How fast (in ) must a centrifuge rotate if a particle 8.00 from the axis of rotation is to experience an acceleration of 117000 's?
February 10, 2011 by Tara

physics
A space station is shaped like a ring and rotates to simulate gravity. If the radius of the space station is 150 m, at what frequency must it rotate so that it simulates Earth's gravity? [Hint: The apparent weight of the astronauts must be the same as their weight on Earth.] ...
March 13, 2010 by jade

physics
A sample of blood is placed in a centrifuge of radius 20.0 cm. The mass of a red blood cell is 3.0 10-16 kg, and the magnitude of the force acting on it as it settles out of the plasma is 4.0 10-11 N. At how many revolutions per second should the centrifuge be operated?
October 18, 2010 by Erica

physics
Human blood contains plasma, platelets, and blood cells. To separate the plasma from other components, centrifugation is used. Effective centrifugation requires subjecting blood to an acceleration of 2000g or more. In this situation, assume that blood is contained in test ...
August 31, 2011 by lindsey

college
How fast (in rpm) must a centrifuge rotate if a particle 8.2 cm from the axis of rotation is to experience an acceleration of 200000 g 's?
October 29, 2010 by Sasha

Physics
How fast (in rpm ) must a centrifuge rotate if a particle 8.00 from the axis of rotation is to experience an acceleration of 117000g's?
February 10, 2011 by Sam

physics
Find the linear speed of the bottom of a test tube in a centrifuge if the centripetal acceleration there is 5.5×104 times the acceleration of gravity. The distance from the axis of rotation to the bottom of the test tube is 8.0 .
March 25, 2011 by christina

Physics
Find the linear speed of the bottom of a test tube in a centrifuge if the centripetal acceleration there is 5.1×104 times the acceleration of gravity. The distance from the axis of rotation to the bottom of the test tube is 7.7 .
November 3, 2011 by Chris

physics
Find the linear speed of the bottom of a test tube in a centrifuge if the centripetal acceleration there is 5.4×104 times the acceleration of gravity. The distance from the axis of rotation to the bottom of the test tube is 7.9cm.
October 29, 2011 by Anonymous

physics
An orbiting spacecraft is described not as a "zero-g" but rather as a "microgravity" environment for its occupants and for onboard experiments. Astronauts experience slight lurches due to the motions of equipment and other astronauts and due to venting of materials from the ...
August 10, 2012 by Ben

Physics
Two astronauts, each having a mass M are connected by a length of rope of length d have a negligible mass. They are isolated in space, orbiting their center of mass at an angular speed of ù0. By pulling on the rope, one of the astronauts shortens the total distance between ...
November 14, 2012 by Alphonse

Physics
What angular speed (in revolutions/second) is needed for a centrifuge to produce an acceleration of 1000g at a radius arm of 15.0cm?
June 8, 2010 by Katie

Physics
What angular speed (in revolutions/second) is needed for a centrifuge to produce an acceleration of 1000g at a radius arm of 15.0cm?
October 31, 2010 by Tommy

physics
Two astronauts, each having a mass of 78.5 kg, are connected by a 10.0-m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway between them at a speed of 5.50 m/s. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate each of the following...
December 1, 2012 by heather

Physics
How fast (in rpm) must a centrifuge rotate if a particle 9.00cm from the axis of rotation is to experience an acceleration of 115,000g's?
February 23, 2011 by Emily Grossman

Physics
A centrifuge is a common laboratory instrument that separates components of differing densities in solution. This is accomplished by spinning a sample around in a circle with a large angular speed. Suppose that after a centrifuge in a medical laboratory is turned off, it ...
October 23, 2011 by Jc

Physics
Suppose we have a test tube with two substances of diffferent densitites inside. We want to use a centrifuge with a rotational radius of .2m to separate them. if we want to achieve a centripetal acceleration of 1000g, how fast does it have to spin/ (what is its angular ...
March 21, 2011 by Nicole

Physics (very long question)
Two astronauts (Fig. P8.68), each having a mass of 84.0 kg, are connected by a 10.0 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway betwen them at a speed of 5.80 m/s. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate each of the...
November 18, 2010 by Anonymous

Science
Compare an astronauts weight in orbit with the astronauts weight on Earth, assuming the mass of the astronaut doesn't change.
March 28, 2011 by Janice

Science
Compare an astronauts weight in orbit with the astronauts weight on Earth, assuming the mass of the astronaut doesn't change.
March 28, 2011 by Janice

college physics
How fast (in rpm) must a centrifuge rotate if a particle 9.50 cm from the axis of rotation is to experience an acceleration of 113000 g's? Need help please.
May 3, 2010 by peyton

Physics
A sample of blood is placed in a centrifuge of radius 20.0 cm. The mass of a red blood cell is 3.0 10−16 kg, and the magnitude of the force acting on it as it settles out of the plasma is 4.0 10−11 N. At how many revolutions per second should the centrifuge be ...
October 6, 2011 by Allie

Physics
How do you solve this problem? How fast (in rpm) must a centrifuge rotate if a particle 9.00cm from the axis of rotation is to experience an acceleration of 115,000 g's?
February 21, 2011 by Emily Grossman

Physics
A centrifuge spins a suspension at 2500 rpm in a radius of 20 cm. What is the acceleration of the suspension?
August 11, 2011 by Prathiksha

physics
A certain centrifuge produces a centripetal acceleration of magnitude exactly 1090g at a point 12.3 cm from the axis of rotation. Find the number of revolutions per second.
September 9, 2013 by yaya

physics
a certain centrifuge produce a centripetal acceleration of magnigtude exactly 1410g at a point 12.3 cm from the axis of rotation. find the number of revolutions per second
November 25, 2013 by Anonymous

Physics
Find the centripetal acceleration at the top of a test tube in a centrifuge, given that the top is 4.5 from the axis of rotation and that its linear speed is 76 .
November 3, 2011 by Chris

physics
Two astronauts, each having a mass of 89.0 kg, are connected by a 10.0 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, moving in circles around the point halfway between them at a speed of 5.60 m/s. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate each of the following.
July 15, 2012 by Anonymous

physics
Our muscles atrophy when there is no gravitational force. On long space flights this is a problem, which is why astronauts exercise. On very long space flights it might be advisable to simulate gravity. Your space ship is a long cylinder of radius 100 m that spins about its ...
July 29, 2013 by Steven

physics
You have probably seen films of astronauts floating weightless in orbiting satellites. People often get the idea that the astronauts are weightless because they are so far from the gravity of the earth. Let us see if that explanation is correct. Typically, such satellites ...
November 8, 2010 by steph

Physics
You have probably seen films of astronauts floating weightless in orbiting satellites. People often get the idea that the astronauts are weightless because they are so far from the gravity of the earth. Let us see if that explanation is correct. Typically, such satellites ...
November 10, 2010 by Carmen

physics
A centrifuge is revolving at the rate 10,000rpm. The radius of revolution for a 0.100-g particle being separated is 8.00 cm. a) Identify the given quantities with their symbols and units. b) What is the angular speed in radians per second? c) What is the linear speed in meters...
October 25, 2011 by karen

Physics
Two astronauts, each having a mass of 61.9 kg, are connected by a 14.7 m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, orbiting their center of mass at speeds of 5.57 m/s. Calculate the magnitude of the initial angular momentum of the system by treating the astronauts ...
March 27, 2013 by Celeste

physics-rotational dynamics
Two astronauts, each having a mass of 75.0 kg, are connected by a 10.0 m rope of negligible mass. THey are isolated in space,orbiting their center of mass at speeds of 5.00 m/s. calculate A)magnitude of the angular momentum of the system by treating astronauts as particles and...
February 12, 2007 by cyndi

Physics
Know matter how i work it out, i keep getting the wrong answers. please help!!! i only have two more submissions before it closes on me. A sample of blood is placed in a centrifuge of radius 14.0 cm. The mass of a red blood cell is 3.0 x 10^-16 kg, and the magnitude of the ...
March 7, 2014 by Please Help!!!

Physics
no matter how i work it out, i keep getting the wrong answers. please help!!! i only have two more submissions before it closes on me. A sample of blood is placed in a centrifuge of radius 14.0 cm. The mass of a red blood cell is 3.0 x 10^-16 kg, and the magnitude of the force...
March 16, 2014 by Please Help!!!

Physics
Consider an interstellar spaceship powered by matter-antimatter reactions. The energy resulting from the matter-antimatter reactions is ejected from the exhaust as electromagnetic radiation producing thrust. The design goal is to have the thrust produce an acceleration equal ...
February 5, 2014 by Monika

Physics
Know matter how i work it out, i keep getting the wrong answers. please help!!! i only have two more submissions before it closes on me. A sample of blood is placed in a centrifuge of radius 14.0 cm. The mass of a red blood cell is 3.0 ✕ 10−16 kg, and the ...
March 7, 2014 by Please Help!!!

physics
A centrifuge is a common laboratory instrument that separates components of differing densities in solution. This is accomplished by spinning a sample around in a circle with a large angular speed. Suppose that after a centrifuge in a medical laboratory is turned off, it ...
November 3, 2011 by marie

Physics
while on the moon, the Apollo astronauts enjoyed the effect of a gravity much smaller than that on earth. if Neil Armstrong jumped up on the moon with an initial speed of 1.51 m/s to a height of 0.700m, what amount of gravitational acceleration did he experience?
February 3, 2011 by Marissa

physics!
A centrifuge is a device in which a small container of material is rotated at a high speed on a circular path. Such a device is used in medical laboratories, for instance, to cause the more dense red blood cells to settle through the less dense blood serum and collect at the ...
February 14, 2011 by Gina

Physics
A centrifuge is a device in which small container of material is rotated at a high speed on a circular path. Such a device is a used in medical laboratories, for instance, to cause the more dense red blood cells to settle through the less dense blood serum and collect at the ...
July 15, 2011 by Kelli

Physics
A centrifuge is a device in which small container of material is rotated at a high speed on a circular path. Such a device is a used in medical laboratories, for instance, to cause the more dense red blood cells to settle through the less dense blood serum and collect at the ...
July 15, 2011 by Kelli

Physics!!
A centrifuge is a device in which small container of material is rotated at a high speed on a circular path. Such a device is a used in medical laboratories, for instance, to cause the more dense red blood cells to settle through the less dense blood serum and collect at the ...
July 18, 2011 by Kelli

physics
A centrifuge is a device in which a small container of material is rotated at a high speed on a circular path. Such a device is used in medical laboratories, for instance, to cause the more dense red blood cells to settle through the less dense blood serum and collect at the ...
February 22, 2012 by Natasha

Physics
A centrifuge is a device in which a small container of material is rotated at a high speed on a circular path. Such a device is used in medical laboratories, for instance, to cause the more dense red blood cells to settle through the less dense blood serum and collect at the ...
October 3, 2013 by Tyler

Physics
If astronauts could travel at v=0.89c, we on Earth would say it takes (4.20/0.890)=4.72 years to reach Alpha Centauri, 4.20 light years away. The astronaut would disagree. (a) How much time passes on the astronaut's clocks? (b) What is the distance to Alpha Centauri according ...
May 2, 2012 by LUMBA

statistics
space shuttle astronauts each consume an average of 3000 calories per day. one meal normally consists of a main dish, a vegetable dish, and 2 different desserts. the astronauts can choose from 11 man dishes, 8 vegetable dishes, and 12 desserts. how many different meals are ...
November 9, 2011 by kerri

Physics
You are explaining why astronauts feel weightless while orbiting in the space shuttle. Your friends respond that they thought gravity was just a lot weaker up there. Convince them and yourself that it isn't so by calculating the acceleration of gravity 562 km above the Earth's...
October 4, 2009 by Jen

physics
Imagine that you want to create an activity for a group of children to simulate the periodic table. Suggest items that you may use and how they may be organized in rows and columns. Be creative. Share your ideas and offer further suggestions to your classmates' ideas.
September 15, 2010 by Anonymous

science
The pull of gravity keeps the Moon in orbit around Earth. The distance between the Earth and Moon is about 380,000 kilometers. A crew of astronauts leaves Earth on a Monday and lands on the Moon on a Thursday. They land on the side of the Moon facing away from the Earth. On ...
February 2, 2012 by Bryan

Physics
Centrifuges are commonly used in biological laboratories for the isolation and maintenance of cell preparations. For cell separation, assume centrifugation conditions that are 1.00 x 103 rpm using an 8.16-cm-radius rotor. What is the radial acceleration of material in the ...
October 3, 2012 by Liz

science
When astronauts travel into space, they can still see Earth and the moon. why is this possible? A. The sun shines in the windows of their space vehicle. B. They view earth and moon through a telescope. C. The sun's light reflects off earth and the moon. D. The astronauts look ...
March 27, 2010 by Anonymous

physics
A rocket-driven sled running on a straight, level track has been used to study the physiological effects of large accelerations on astronauts. One such sled can attain a speed of 440 m/s in 1.9 s starting from rest. What is the acceleration of the sled, assuming it is ...
September 25, 2011 by Emily

Physics
Whenever two Apollo astronauts were on the surface of the Moon, a third astronaut orbited the Moon. Assume the orbit to be circular and 160 km above the surface of the Moon, where the acceleration due to gravity is 1.42 m/s2. The radius of the Moon is 1.70 106 m. (a) Determine...
October 2, 2012 by Kristen

physics
hi i have a physics question i dont understand here is the question A sample of blood is placed in a centrifuge of radius 15 cm. the mass of the corpuscle is 3.0*10^-16 kg, and the magnitude of the force required to make it settle out of the plasma is 4.0X10^-11 N. At how many...
January 2, 2007 by becky

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