Sunday
April 20, 2014

Posts by Writeacher


Total # Posts: 33,911

Civics...a few more questions
Let us know what YOU THINK, and someone here will be able to comment on your thinking and writing.

English
1) OK 2)Elizabeth I continued her father's policies. She defeated the Spanish Armada, which had heavy, slow ships, while the English ships were smaller, faster, and equipped with long-range guns. 3) OK 4) OK 5) Most of the actions took place on the apron stage. 6) The uppe...

???
You really need to follow directions and put your SUBJECT in the subject space. I've never heard of a class called "Help" before. Ms Sue answered your first question. Now it's your turn to let us know what YOU THINK.

English
"Stamp collecting" is fun for children and adults alike. (Subject) Gerund as subject, yes. Which "of my stamps" do I like most? (Adverb) Prepositional phrase as adverb, no. Collectors "engaging in their hobbies" are never bored. (Adjective) Partic...

Civics
You're welcome!

Civics
That's correct, yes. Criticism of the government and advocacy of unpopular ideas that people may find distasteful or against public policy are almost always permitted. There are exceptions to these general protections, including the Miller test for obscenity, child pornogr...

Civics
Then ALL are not unlimited, right?

Civics
ARE they unlimited??

English (grammar)
You're VERY welcome. =)

English (grammar)
Yes, it can ... it'll read fine either in past or present.

English (grammar)
It would be better to replace "being" with "becoming." Then it'll read better and make better sense.

English
You're pretty much guessing on 1 and 2. 4 is now correct.

English
Infinitive phrases begin with "to" verb forms: to walk, to read, etc. I don't see any absolute phrases here.

English
Sorry ... #3 is a gerund phrase. #s 1 and 2, as well as 4, are the ones you need to rethink.

English
Almost right! Yes, #3 is a gerund phrase. Here's why: Landing in New England is serving as the subject of the main verb, caused. In 2 and 3, however, both -ing phrases are describing (modifying) the subjects of the sentences. Who was "leaving their native land"? ...

English
All are incorrect, sorry. =( Notice that 1, 2, and 3 all start with words ending in -ing. No preposition has -ing at the end. Go back and rethink all of these, please. http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1385695339

English
First of all, each sentence has far too much information in it to read well. Please divide these 2 sentences into 4 or 5 sentences. Then re-post, and we'll go from there.

English
Study these and then let us know what you think about each one above. And please number them, so no one gets confused about which one is which. http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/prepositionalphrase.htm http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/appositive.htm http://www.chompchomp.com/term...

socials question help plz!!
Keeping his land together (not letting it get cut up into smaller and smaller plots) by means of primogeniture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primogeniture ) Also navigate through this for several other ways: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_legacy_of_medieval_Europe#slide2

English
No, none are correct. Here are the ways these ideas should be phrased: 1, 2, 3 = No one in that house sleeps well during the night. (You can put other qualifiers in place of the underlined words, but something needs to be there. It will not make sense to say, "No one slee...

English
1) The Elizabethan theatre was a circular or octagonal wooden structure. 2) In the middle of the theatre, there was a pit, open to the sky. In it, there was the apron stage, the main stage, raised about five feet from the ground. 3) At the back of the main stage, there was a s...

Pharmacy Technician
www.google.com or www.bing.com

English
The first one is incorrect. The second one is quite awkward. The third is grammatically correct but seems incomplete. (Surely you don't mean "Nobody" in the whole world!) The fourth and fifth have about the same meaning and are correct. The sixth is grammatically...

English
Correct.

English
All are grammatically correct, but #3 is the best of all. #1 is OK. If you use #2, you need to complete the comparison: "... the most carefully of all the students." (example)

us hist
http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/fort-sumter.html?tab=facts I think you're right, but double-check here to be sure.

To Anonymous re Behavioural Economics in Action
I have removed your post ... your entire test or homework or whatever it was. No one here will do your work for you, but if you go through this and answer these questions yourself ... and post no more than 5 that you aren't sure of, someone may be able to help.

English
What's in italics??

german
I'm not sure we have a tutor with German expertise. Maybe something in one of these search results will help you: http://www.bing.com/search?q=modal+verbs+in+german&go=&qs=n&form=QBLH&pq=modal+verbs+in+german&sc=3-21&sp=-1&sk=&ghc=1&cvid=8bf596c715a14c008ea89e956b4bcfce

English
correct

history
You're expecting someone to do your work for you?? You post what YOU THINK, and someone here may be able to help.

English
You're expecting someone to do your work for you?? You post what YOU THINK, and someone here may be able to help.

English
You're expecting someone to do your work for you?? You post what YOU THINK, and someone here may be able to help.

English
Yes, they do. I think there's more rhyme than documentable rhythm (meter) in these three lines.

English
Couldn't A also be the answer for the third one? I agree with your first two answers.

quick english help
Yes, it's c, but not because of any verb ending. It's c because the infinitive phrase is serving as the direct object of the main verb, "needed."

poetry
You're expecting someone to read this long poem and then do your work for you?? You post what YOU THINK, and someone here may be able to help. http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-prairies/

psychology270
By means of an LCD projector with a USB port?? http://www.google.com/search?q=lcd+projector+with+usb+port&oq=lcd+projector+with+usb+port&aqs=chrome..69i57.6774j0j7&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=119&ie=UTF-8

English
When you change "the things which" into "what," you have turned a relative clause into an indirect question. Direct question ~~> What will happen in the future? Indirect question ~~> about what will happen in the future? I've never seen "what...

introduction to health care
I disagree. PDAs have been around since the 1990s.

introduction to health care
I am not sure, but I don't think it's a!!

introduction to health care
I agree.

English
Leaving "that" in is fine. Omit "should" from all of the sentences.

English
#1 - Don't piggyback your questions on someone else's post. Use Post a New Questions. #2 - Realize that no one will do your work for you. You write up your response to your assignment, and someone here will check it for you, as long as you don't post a rough draft.

English
Correct.

Instructions
I agree with Ms. Sue: one question in each group of four; but yes, you do need to double-check with your teacher. This is the part that's confusing: "Please select and respond to any ONE question under all of the questions listed below."

Mean and standard deviations
Putting your coded course name is not going to get you very far. If you put the subject in the Subject box ... as specifically as possible ... you're more likely to get help from someone who knows that area of study.

english
Bravo, Ms. Sue.

English
1 and 2 are pretty much the same, yes. 1 is better because it doesn't have the extra word, although that extra word doesn't make it incorrect! 3 and 4 mean the same thing, yes. Either one works fine.

English
1 is incomplete. Comparative and superlative forms are used for comparisons, but there's no hint of comparison in 1. 2 is OK. It implies that he works harder than all the other people in his group (whatever that may be). 3 and 4 mean the same thing, yes. 5 and 6 imply that...

cinfidentiality in allied health
What are the other choices?

confidentiality in allied health
I agree.

English
Both mean the same thing, except that 1 has that indirect question in it introduced by "what," while 2 has a relative clause introduced by "which." http://speakspeak.com/resources/english-grammar-rules/questions/structures-of-indirect-questions http://www.c...

English
In this (not a complete sentence yet!), "what" is an interrogative pronoun. It's introducing an indirect question.

English
Neither is grammatically correct. Here are some fixes: On the farm, many workers are busy these days. On the farm, many works of art can be found.

English
I'd use all except 3 ... well, unless there were a noun following "this" in 3. (In the playground lay this dog.)

English
I would not use 3. I would rarely use 4, but not when speaking about rain. 1 and 2 are fine.

language arts
Yes, B. Do you see why?

language arts
The sentence in which the subject does the action is active. John hit the baseball <~~active The baseball was hit by John. <~~ passive

Social Studies (History)
I think you have gotten a rather negative interpretation of this concept. Melting pot or salad bowl, both are intended to describe the strengths of the US. In the melting pot image, everyone would "melt" together, races and ethnicities would mix, and we would all be ...

English stories
I think you need to re-think the themes you are choosing. http://www.life123.com/parenting/education/children-reading/12-most-common-themes-in-literature.shtml http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/mocking/themes.html http://www.enotes.com/topics/boys-girls/themes

English
#1 is best. The others are OK, but would not be used much. #s 3 and 5 (if used) would probably be best in poetry.

Englishj
moo-NAH-kee http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonachie,_NJ

English
They mean the same thing, but #1 is the better sentence -- less wordy! And yes, I think "left" is an adjective modifying "money."

english
None of us can "be like him, his beliefs." Each of us has our own beliefs, and some may be strong enough to move us to acts of civil disobedience. So the question is ... what do you strongly believe is wrong enough that you'd be willing to be civilly disobedient?

english
Ms. Sue already answered your question: The question for you is what do you strongly believe is wrong enough that you'd be willing to be civilly disobedient? What don't you understand about her question and how it is simply restating your assignment?

Philosophy
Are you clear on the meanings of all those words? http://www.dictionary.com Let us know what you decide.

ms. sue
Get ready to turn in! =)

ms. sue
The St Clairs are a Chinese woman and a white man. Make note of the last name!

First things first
Draw the images first. Then you can worry about what to write.

from the Joy Luck Club
Your work so far is fine. Just add your own graphics of each of your characters, and you'll be ready to turn it all in.

Language Arts
You write, and someone here will read it over for you. Sensory details: ~ what do you see? ~ what do you hear? ~ what do you feel when you touch something on such a day? ~ what do you taste? ~ what do you smell?

Journalism
Perhaps divide it all into categories: Popular songs for the season Christmas carols written just for Christmas Christmas carols adapted from another time (etc.) What other categories can you think of? Once you have this figured out, you'll be able to choose two or three c...

cultural dances
You're very welcome ... and happy Thanksgiving to you, too!

cultural dances
Line dancing, yes. http://www.google.com/search?q=cowboy+boogie&oq=cowboy+boogie&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.2972j0j7&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8

grammar
http://www.answers.com/retreat http://www.answers.com/re-treat http://www.answers.com/recreate http://www.answers.com/re-create

reading (Ms. Sue or Writeacher)
YOU must use your imagination and think of what you want to include. Once you do, let us know, and maybe we can give you feedback.

reading what does this mean?
The St Clairs are a husband and wife ... the wife was born in China and married to a man from the US.

reading what does this mean?
right

reading what does this mean?
Write up what you think ... and post it. I'll check it for you.

reading what does this mean?
The St Clairs are a husband and wife ... the wife was born in China and married to a man from the US. They have raised a daughter about the same age as the narrator, Jing-Mei. Use your imagination. Many very old women are really tiny because of bone-density loss. I imagine thi...

reading what does this mean?
So that means the St Clairs are friends with the narrator's parents, right? Do you kow where this story comes from? It's a chapter out of the book called The Joy Luck Club. "The Joy Luck Club refers to the novel by Amy Tan, published in 1989 ... In various forms, ...

reading what does this mean?
Old Chong's mother must be a VERY old lady. How do I know? Because the narrator refers to Mr. Chong as "old." So ... what is there in what you quoted that fits with being a very old person? Use that. The St. Clairs are the flattest of all ... there is NOTHING in ...

reading what does this mean?
I'm surprised at such a skimpy assignment. Yes, Old Chong's mother is static, but there's a slight description of her there. I'm surprised that you don't have to tell at least a little about her ... same with the St. Claires. Waverly is different. She's...

reading what does this mean?
You mean Old Chong's mother, right? Not Old Chong himself?

reading what does this mean?
What terms (besides "flat") can you use to describe Old Chong's mother, according to the quotation from the story? I met Old Lady Chong once, and that was enough. She had a peculiar smell, like a baby that had done something in its pants, and her fingers felt lik...

reading what does this mean?
Waverly isn't completely "flat," but the others are. What other "character terms" have you been told you can use besides "flat/static"?

reading what does this mean?
Make sure each character has all four elements: Each page will present 1) a character, 2) character terms specific to this character, 3) a graphic image and 4) text suppot that "proves" each character term that has been assigned. ~ You've made a good start, once ...

reading what does this mean?
In your responses for St. Claire and Old Chong's mother, who are "they"?

reading what does this mean?
If you will state completely what you plan to write up about each of your 3 characters, I'll check it all for you.

Haikus
This may help: http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Haiku-Poem

Haikus
I also don't see any symbolism in these.

Haikus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haiku Be sure to read, thoroughly, about all three elements of a haiku. I hear the 5-7-5 (syllables or on) in yours, but I don't see the kireji. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haiku#Kireji I also don't see any particular kigo in these. http:/...

law
Per Bob Pursley: All the data is heuristics. Prosecutors settle cases, or if they can't , they charge the defendant with anything remotely connected, hoping to force the person to settle with a plea agreement.

rhetoric (essay writing)
I went to www.bing.com and entered egypt black racism, and here are the results: http://www.bing.com/search?setmkt=en-US&q=egypt+black+racism You can enter the same search words in www.google.com and see what else pops up.

English
1 ~~ In this sentence, "open" is an object complement. It's an adjective modifying the direct object "it." http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/objects.htm#objects Scroll down to the COMPLEMENTS section and read the second example given for Object Com...

criminal justice
http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1385217694

English
It's a prepositional phrase and seems to be modifying "Mike," but it could also be taken as adverbial ... telling where "This is." I think I'd go with adverbial!

English
If he is not interested in anything going on around him, he's bored. If he is a very uninteresting person, then he is boring!

history
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_1860

Pages: <<Prev | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | Next>>

Search
Members