Thursday
March 5, 2015

Homework Help: Chemistry

Posted by Serena on Thursday, May 8, 2014 at 7:54pm.

So I am trying to understand in molecular terms the solubility of NaCl in water.

So there are intramolecular forces that are mostly ionic between the ions, creating this partial positive, partial negative substance. And the intermolecular forces are also ionic. Ionic forces are the strongest of the intermolecular forces, right?
So if this is the case, why does NaCl dissolve in water because the hydrogen bonds shouldn't be strong enough to break the ionic bonds. Is it because there are so many hydrogen bonds that they end up breaking the single ionic bond?

Thanks!

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