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March 30, 2017

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[ms Yardley is an art dealer. The man is going to hand a picture by Picasso.]
'Fifty thousand Euros, Ms Yardley,' the man says. 'I want fifty thousand Euros to get it.'

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What does the last sentence mean? Would you paraphrase 'I want fifty thousand Euros to get it'?

  • English - ,

    I'm not sure what that means.

    If Ms Yardley wants to BUY the Picasso, then the sentence should read this way:
    Fifty thousand Euros, Ms Yardley,' the man says. 'I want fifty thousand Euros if you want to buy it.

    However, if the man wants to buy the Picasso, the sentence should read this way:
    Fifty thousand Euros, Ms Yardley,' the man says. 'I want to pay no more than fifty thousand Euros to buy it.

  • English - ,

    Thank you for your help.
    What about the following expression:

    'I want fifty thousand Euros for you to get it.' ( It seems to be a Picasso picture. You means 'Yardley.')

  • English - ,

    This is not normal phrasing because it's not clear: "I want fifty thousand Euros for you to get it."

    Is he saying he wants her to pay him 50,000 Euros?

    Is he saying he wants her to have the painting and he'll pay the 50,000 Euros?

    It's just not clear.

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