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March 25, 2017

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What was one attempt to solve the problem with working conditions in the Gilded Age?

  • Social Studies (History) - ,

    http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/features/us/jan-june11/triangle_03-17.html

  • Social Studies (History) - ,

    I already got one that says "many states passed minimum age laws (usually 12 years old and work no more than 10 hours a day), but these were often ignored."
    The problem is I am having a hard time trying to figure out another attempt.

  • Social Studies (History) - ,

    Obviously you didn't read the site I posted for you.

  • Social Studies (History) - ,

    Okay, so another attempt was that laborers went on strike on demand of better working conditions/other reasons?

  • Social Studies (History) - ,

    Your question asks for an attempt to solve the problem. What about the changes after the Triangle fire?

  • Social Studies (History) - ,

    Oh, you mean when the New York state legislature established the Factory Investigating Commission, or FIC, to look into the safety of workplaces across the state. By addressing sanitation, rest periods, child labor, work hours for women and children, and injuries sustained on the job.

  • Social Studies (History) - ,

    Right. And more -- from the above website.

    "In 1912, the legislature passed eight labor bills recommended by the FIC that addressed sanitation, rest periods, child labor, work hours for women and children, and injuries sustained on the job. The legislature eventually passed 25 more bills recommended by the FIC.

    "Today, factories and workplaces in the United States operate under strict labor laws dictated by the government and unions, many of which were first set forth by the New York state legislature after the Triangle Shirtwaist fire."

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