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i need some advice im a freshmen in hghschool and i have one honor class this semester and the 1st term i got a 80.6 and im struggling more is it better to be in it or just take regular and have an a over a b are their any benefits of it

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    I think there are benefits to getting an A in a regular class than a B in an honors class. It's better that you learn what is taught in a lower level class so that you'll be better prepared when you do take the next level.

    Education is not a race. It's a process. You don't have to complete four years of high school in three years.

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    just stay in the class it is an honors class and your first high school honors class so it it good that your are experiencing a higher work load than a regular. you had a choice to be in the class and from my point of view you should face the consequences of your actions, honors class = more work you knew this and thus I personally think you should push out more work even though it is hard. a 80.6 is not that bad.

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    thank for for your advice

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    Please check back again. Other tutors may also have advice and pertinent arguments.

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    I agree with Ms. Sue ... an A in a regular class is better than a weak B or a C in an honors or AP class. And I agree that you shouldn't pit yourself against what other people are or aren't doing. Each student needs to take his/her own route.

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    At one time the university where I taught had a honors chemistry class taught in freshman class of college(not high school) and it was open to students who scored above a certain level on a test we gave the first day of class to everyone enrolled in freshman chemistry. Those eligible students then were given a choice to switch to the AP class but it was up to them. A colleague taught that course for the first two years it was offered and I taught it the next two years. We had engineering, premed, predental, and prepharmacy students in that class. Most if not all would have made an A had they stayed in regular chem class; most did not make an A in the honors class and quite a few made C. After four years we dropped that class from the schedule and we never offered it again in the 36 years I was there. The general feeling of faculty, students, their parents, and some townspeople was that it was a hindrance to the students who were trying to make it into med school, dental school, pharmacy school, etc. where GPA was so important. I don't know that it kept anyone out of those professional schools but that's mostly because the students worked so hard the next three years to overcome that poorer showing the first year. I tend to agree with Ms Sue. I think there are benefits from getting an A in regular class over a B in honors class. I think that knowing the material one gets in regular class thoroughly is just as good as knowing a smattering in honors class. In fact, I think it's better. I would bet that when an employer/graduate school/university admissions officer looks at your transcript they will see the As, Bs and GPA but few (very few I think) will look to see if that B was in an honors class. Furthermore, the fact that you have written this question means you have learned from it; it isn't necessary to suffer through until the end to "teach yourself a lesson" or to "show you can suffer the consequences like a 'man'."

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    Bravo, DrBob!

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    A question I often ask to students who are incoming to college: Why would anyone ever pay for a course to get an easy grade from an easy teacher.

    My advice is to pick the most demanding teachers teaching the most demanding courses.

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    I think the most important part of DrBob's post is this:

    I think that knowing the material one gets in regular class thoroughly is just as good as knowing a smattering in honors class. In fact, I think it's better.

  • addendum to my response - ,

    When I was a freshman in college all incoming students were given a test in English. Those scoring above some point were moved (we had no choice) to an honors English class. The prof explained that we scored high enough that we didn't need the traditional course in English. Instead we would focus on reading the classics and that kind of thing. That was the last English class I took in my next 9 years of college, including graduate school, and was the last chance to teach me grammar, speaking, writing, and the basics of English that I didn't get in high school. As a result of the shortcomings in that class I don't know the first thing about writing skills, speaking skills, basic grammar, tenses, and all of those things that lets people know that one is "educated". I still feel intimidated when speaking to an English prof, when addressing large groups of people, or when writing for the public as I do on this forum. I agree that getting an A is not the most important part of taking a class and that learning ALL of the material thoroughly is; however, the grade is the next most important part and that's what employers/admission officers look at in this GPA conscious environment/litigious society we live in.

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