Monday
September 22, 2014

Homework Help: college statistics

Posted by penelope on Thursday, July 18, 2013 at 11:58am.

I am having a bit of trouble with some of the questions. Some of the ones I put below have an answer, is there anyway you can check the answer and help me with the rest I am having trouble with.


Your sociology teacher claims that 60 percent of American males are married. You believe the percentage is higher. In a random sample of 973 American males, 65.8% of them were married. Is this evidence that your sociology teacher's claim is false? 1. Choose the appropriate null and alternative hypotheses for this problem:
a. Null: 65.8% of American males are married Alternative: Fewer than 65.8% of American males are married
b. Null: 60% of American males are married Alternative: Fewer than 60% of American males are married
c. Null: 60% of American males are married Alternative: More than 60% of American males are married
d. Null: 65.8% of American males are married Alternative: More than 65.8% of American males are married

I think it is C



2. The test statistic for this hypothesis test is closest to:
a. 11.8
b. 5.8
c. 3.7
d. 1.3


3. The p-value for this hypothesis is closest to:
a. 9.7%
b. 0.01%
c. 35.6%
d. 1.1%


4. Choose the correct conclusion.
a. It is very unlikely that the null hypothesis is true. (Reject the null hypothesis.)
b. The null hypothesis is likely to be true. (Accept the null hypothesis.)
c. The alternative hypothesis is definitely true. (Accept the alternative hypothesis.)
d. It is very unlikely that the alternative hypothesis is true. (Reject the alternative hypothesis.)


Use the information below to answer questions 5-7.
Dr. Jones claims that 40% of his college algebra class (very large section) will drop his course by midterm. To test his claim, he selected 45 names at random and discovered that 20 of them had already dropped long before midterm.


5. The correct null and alternative hypotheses for testing the claim are:
a. null: 20 students drop by midterm alt: 45 students drop by midterm
b. null: 44% of students drop by midterm alt: 40% of students drop by midterm
c. null: more than 40% of students drop by midterm alt: fewer than 40% of students drop by midterm
d. null: 40% of students drop by midterm alt: more than 40% of students drop by midterm


6. The test statistic value for his hypothesis test is closest to
a. 0.60
b. 0.40
c. 4.40
d. 7.40


7. Based on the sample he collected, Dr. Jones can safely conclude that:
a. Exactly 44% of his students drop by midterm.
b. It is plausible that 40% of his students drop by midterm.
c. Significantly more than 40% of his students drop by midterm.
d. Significantly fewer than 40% of his students drop by midterm.


Use the information below to answer questions 8-10.
It was reported that a certain population had an average of 27. To test this claim, you selected a random sample of size 100. The computed sample average was 25 and the sample SD was 7. The null and alternative hypotheses are listed below.
Null: The average of the population is 27. Alternate: The average of the population is less than 27.


8. The computed test statistic for these hypotheses is closest to:
a. -4.1
b. -0.4
c. -28.6
d. -2.9

I think it is D

9. The computed p-value for these hypotheses is closest to:
a. 0.2%
b. 0
c. 35%
d. 2.3%

I think it is A

10. Based on the p-value, you can claim that the average of the population:
a. is likely to be equal to 27.
b. is unlikely to be equal to 27.
c. is exactly 25.
d. is likely to be equal to 25.

I think it is B

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