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Posted by on Saturday, June 15, 2013 at 4:36am.

We have an infinite, non-conducting sheet of negligible thickness carrying a uniform surface charge density +σ=7.00e-6 C/m2 and, next to it, an infinite parallel slab of thickness D=17 cm with uniform volume charge density ρ=−4.94e-5 C/m3 (see sketch). Note that the slab has a negative charge. All charges are fixed in place and cannot move.

Reminder: The "x.xxenn C/m2 and C/m3" notations for σ and ρ, respectively, mean "x.xx×10nn C/m2 and C/m3".


Assuming the infinite sheet is in the x-y plane, and zˆ points as shown in the figure, calculate the components of the electric field at the locations listed below. Since we do not ask for the direction separately, these components could be positive or negative.

Give all of your answers in Volts/m.

(a) a distance h=4 cm above (i.e. in the +zˆ direction) the positively charged sheet.
Ex



Ey



Ez


(b) inside the slab at a distance d=4 cm below (i.e. in the −zˆ direction) the positively charged sheet. Note that d<D so that this is also a distance 13 cm above the bottom of the slab.
Ex



Ey



Ez

(c) a distance H=29 cm below (i.e. in the −zˆ direction) the charged sheet. Note that H>D so that this is also a distance 12 cm below the bottom of the slab.


Ex



Ey



Ez

  • Physics - , Saturday, June 15, 2013 at 11:13am

    a) 0
    0
    sigma/(2*epsilon_0) - rho*D/(2*epsilon_0)

    b)
    0
    0

    c)
    0
    0

  • Physics - , Saturday, June 15, 2013 at 1:59pm

    what about c part 3 and b part 3???

  • Physics - , Sunday, June 16, 2013 at 3:43pm

    c part 3)
    -sigma/(2*epsilon_0)-rho*(D-
    d)/(2*epsilon_0) +rho*d/(2*epsilon_0)

  • Physics - , Sunday, June 16, 2013 at 3:44pm

    sry it was b part 3)

  • Physics - , Sunday, June 16, 2013 at 9:31pm

    demon, any help with the capacitor brushes problem?

  • Physics - , Monday, June 17, 2013 at 3:08am

    anyone for question 7

  • Physics - , Monday, June 17, 2013 at 3:50am

    a) (sigma/(2*epsilon_0))-(rho*D/(2*epsilon_0))

    c)-sigma/(2*epsilon_0)+(rho*D/(2*epsilon_0))

  • Physics - , Monday, June 17, 2013 at 3:50am

    Please, Question 3

  • Physics - , Monday, June 17, 2013 at 3:52am

    b) -sigma/(2*epsilon_0)-rho*(D-
    d)/(2*epsilon_0) +rho*d/(2*epsilon_0)

  • Physics - , Monday, June 17, 2013 at 5:02am

    Please question 7, 9, 10 and 11.

  • Physics - , Monday, June 17, 2013 at 5:07am

    anyone for 8

  • Physics - , Monday, June 17, 2013 at 5:11am

    Please 7, 9, 10 and 11.

  • Physics - , Monday, June 17, 2013 at 5:18am

    7) a) lambda/0.5
    b) lambda/0.125

    Please question 3, 5, 8

  • Physics - , Monday, June 17, 2013 at 12:23pm

    For Inductor
    a: I=0 A
    b: (Supply Voltage/R)*(1-e^(-Rt/L))
    c: see above (put the value of t in sec

    For Capacitor
    Use v(t)=Supply Voltage*(1-e^(-t/RC))
    Divide the above answer by R to get the Current

  • Physics - , Monday, June 17, 2013 at 12:33pm

    question 9
    a: Ec1=Voltage/plate separation
    b: because the battery is connected the E field does not change

    c: when the battery is disconnected then
    Q1+Q2 must equal Q1'+Q2'
    Ec1=Q1'/(k*C1*d) and Ec2=Q2'/(C2*d)
    where Q1'=(Q1+Q2)/(1+(C2/K*C1)
    and Q2'=C2/(K*C1)*(Q1+Q2)/(1+(C2/K*C1))

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