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Lang. Arts

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What evidence from the article best supports the article’s main idea: that middle school students should concentrate on a few good relationships and not worry about being popular?
A>“[You] need to see that liking [yourself] is more important than being part of the in crowd.”
B.“Good friends build us up and help us feel confident about ourselves. They will most likely be around long after the in crowd is just a memory.”
C.“Seeking out others with similar interests is often a good place to start trying to fit in and to develop relationships.”
D.“Who is popular varies from place to place. And of course, not every popular kid is obnoxious or a snob or unfriendly.”
I think it is A...?

  • Lang. Arts - ,

    How can we know what is in the article? We cannot know what evidence was presented, you have to figure that out from the article. From my experience with MS kids, both a and b are true, and again from exprerience with dealing with kids in bad situations, (b) was more important than liking themselves during those times. Sometimes I have met people, including kids, who liked themselves, but most others found them obnoxious, repulsive, and difficult, and of course, they were lonely and had no friends.

    There is a old book you can get from your public library, called The Lonely Crowd, by David Reisman. It is a college level book, but traces the development of the idea of society being inner-directed (answer A) to being other-directed. It is an excellent book to make you think about yourself, and how you fit in. You want never to be controlled by other-directed motives (Answer B), I mean trying to please others when you know what you are doing is not right for you. Read the book, you will gain great self discovery.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lonely_Crowd

    But here, we have no idea what the article stated, and cannot help you.

  • Lang. Arts - ,

    Understood...The article is called The Question of Popularity...and A through D is stated at different times in the article...I understand what you are saying and thank you for the advice.

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