Friday
March 27, 2015

Homework Help: Calculus

Posted by Lisa on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 2:38pm.

Use a trig identity to combine two functions into one so you can solve for x. (The solution should be valid for any value of t).

3cos(t) + 3*sqrt(3)*sin(t)=6cos(t-x)

I know that 6 cos(t-x) can be 6(cos(t)cosx(x)+sin(t)sin(x))
I dont know where to go from there though.

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