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Weatherwise is a magazine published by the American Meteorological Society. One issue gives a rating system used to classify Nor'easter storms that frequently hit New England and can cause much damage near the ocean. A severe storm has an average peak wave height of ì = 16.4 feet for waves hitting the shore. Suppose that a Nor'easter is in progress at the severe storm class rating. Peak wave heights are usually measured from land (using binoculars) off fixed cement piers. Suppose that a reading of 38 waves showed an average wave height of x = 17.2 feet. Previous studies of severe storms indicate that ó = 3.5 feet. Does this information suggest that the storm is (perhaps temporarily) increasing above the severe rating? Use á = 0.01.

  • Math - ,

    Z = (mean1 - mean2)/standard error (SE) of difference between means

    SEdiff = √(SEmean1^2 + SEmean2^2)

    SEm = SD/√n

    If only one SD is provided, you can use just that to determine SEdiff.

    Find table in the back of your statistics text labeled something like "areas under normal distribution" to find the proportion/probability

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