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English

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Hey,
Yesterday I asked a question about "the" and Writeacher helped me a lot. But now I have a further question.
I have a rule in my grammar book, which says, that Nationalities with the suffix -ese. -ch, -sh, -ss; goes with the. And wirteacher says that I can Also says "The Americans..." Is it a change in language? We have in German a few such changes in language and now I wonder wheter it is the same in english..

  • English -

    I think German has fewer exceptions, variations, and irregularities than English does. Since English is a combination of languages with Germanic roots (mostly grammar and structure and some vocabulary) and all the Latin and Greek influences (mostly in vocabulary), there seem to be more exceptions and variations in phrasing.

  • English -

    But it is sure, that I can use "the" with more nationalties then these with the suffix I write above?!

  • English -

    It all depends on the sentence. If you can post some sentences for me, I can help you better.

  • English -

    The first paragraph here is what I gave you the other day:
    http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/determiners/determiners.htm

    Did you go into this linked section, too?
    http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/determiners/determiners.htm#articles
    Read carefully ... all of it!

  • English -

    The French drink a lot of wine.
    The Americans are frindly people.
    The Germans always eat Weisswurst.
    The Iraquis live in a warm land.

    And all these sentence can go without "the", right?

  • English -

    I'd say that all can go without "The" except the first sentence.

  • English -

    Ok, as I write the first sentence, I had the feeling, it can't go without.
    I thank you again very much!

  • English -

    You're very welcome!

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