Tuesday
March 28, 2017

Post a New Question

Posted by on .

first draft of my report and i need help in improving this. i didn't made up all the information here all comes from a book.

Dissociative identity disorder is defined in the DSM-IV-TR as the presence of two or more personality identities that repeatedly take control of one’s behavior. The patient has an inability to remember his or her personal information. The extent of this lack of recall is too great to be explained by normal forgetfulness.
DID fails to remember certain aspects of memory, consciousness and identity. Patients experience frequent gaps in their memory for their personal history, past and present. Patients with DID report having severe physical or sexual abuse, especially during childhood. The reports of patients with DID are often validated by objective evidence. Physical findings may include scars from physical abuse or self-inflicted injuries, headaches or migraines, asthma and bowel syndrome.
DID is found in a variety of cultures around the world. The author states that DID is diagnosed three to nine times more often in adult females than males. Females average 15 or more identities, males eight identities. The rise in the reported cases of DID in the U.S. may be due the greater awareness of DID’s diagnosis, which has caused an increased identification of those that were previously undiagnosed. The average time period from DID’s first presentation of symptoms to its diagnosis is six to seven years. DID may become less manifest as patients reach past their late 40′s, but it can reemerge during stress, trauma or substance abuse. It is suggested in several studies that DID is more likely to occur with first-degree biological relatives of people that already have DID, than in the regular population.

  • English and Grammar - ,

    Before you go any further with all this, be sure to read and study EVERYTHING on this webpage:
    (Broken Link Removed)

    EVERYTHING!!

    Then read and study all this:

    You need to have each source of information cited in TWO places:

    1. the Works Cited page that is placed after the last page of your paper, and
    2. in parentheses in the text of your paper, immediately after the quotation or paraphrase.

    For example, this would go on the Works Cited page (with proper indentation for the second and following lines):

    Du Bois, W.E.B. The Souls of Black Folk. Chicago, 1903. Project Bartleby. Ed. Steven van Leeuwen. Dec. 1995. Columbia U. 2 Dec. 2003
    <www.cc.columbia.edu/acis/bartleby/dubois/>.

    ... and this would go immediately after the quotation or whatever:
    (Du Bois)

    The information in parentheses in the text needs to be as brief as possible. That's why there's a Works Cited page – for all the details of the listing.

    This is a good place for information on citing in MLA format:
    (Broken Link Removed)

    Hold your cursor over the words CITING SOURCES in the left column and then click on whatever type of source you need help with. Many examples will show up. You will get two examples for each type of reference – one for the Works Cited page and one for the parenthetical (in-text) citation.

    You can also see what a Works Cited page looks like – click on Sample Works Cited in the left column.

    ~~~~~~~~~~

    If you need to cite in APA or another format, go here:

    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
    Use the column at the left as a table of contents.

    (Broken Link Removed)
    This will help you with APA bibliographies.

    (Broken Link Removed)
    Also for APA.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    And here’s an excellent site to give you guidance on how to use quotations well in your papers, long or short: http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/quotations.html

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Once you have revised your paper to indicate quoted elements and cited each one properly, re-post if you want someone to check your work.

Answer This Question

First Name:
School Subject:
Answer:

Related Questions

More Related Questions

Post a New Question