Friday
July 25, 2014

Homework Help: Math

Posted by Emily on Thursday, September 6, 2012 at 8:57pm.

I need to solve this set of differential equations {y'+(t/2)1, y(0)=1} and then find the limiting value as t approaches infinity. I'm not sure where to start. I found the answer to the differential equation to be: y(t)=e^-t^2/4[e^(r^2/4)dr +Ce^(-t^2/4)where the [ sign represents the definite integral from 0 to t. Now I'm not sure how to evaluate the limit of this as t approahes 0. Any help would be appreciated!

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