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Chem

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I really appreciate the help you gave me earlier. I was wondering if you could please look over these questions for me to? The answers will always be either reactant, product or neither.

1)P4(s)+6 Cl2(g)<=>4 PCl3(l)
Which side of the reaction will be favoured by an increase in pressure ?
I chose product?

2) P4(s)+6 Cl2(g)<=>4 PCl3(l)
Which side of the reaction will be favoured by an increase in the amount of PCl3(l) ? I chose reactant?

3) P4(s)+6 Cl2(g)<=>4 PCl3(l)
Which side of the reaction will be favoured by a decrease in the amount of Cl2(g) ? I think it is the product?

4) 2 NO2(g)<=>N2O4(g)+58 kJ
Which side of the reaction will be favoured by the removal of NO2 ?
I think reactant?

5)C(s)+H2O(g)<=>CO(g)+H2(g)+114.4 kJ
Which side of the reaction will be favoured by a decrease in the amount of CO(g) ? I think it is product?

6) 2 NO2(g)<=>N2O4(g)+58 kJ
Which side of the reaction will be favoured by the addition of an inhibitor ? I think it is neither?

Thanks again for the help. I appreciate it!

  • Chem - ,

    2 is neither. Adding PCl3 does not change the concn. Solids, if that is their normal state as in the carbon question before, and liquids (if that is their normal state) are not included in Keq.

    3 is the opposite to your answer for the same reasons that your 4 and 5 are correct.
    Le Chatelier's Principle, which I assume you are studying, says this is VERY common terms. When a system in equilibrium is subjected to a stress, it will shift (move one direction or the other) to undo what we did to it.
    So if we add Cl2 to #3 it will shift so as to undo what we did. What is that? We added so it will try to take it away. And the way it can take away Cl2 is by shifting to the right which means the products are favored. Decreasing a substance is just the opposite; i.e., it will shift to make more of what we've taken away. In the case of #3, removing Cl2 will make it shift to the left and the reactants are favored.

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