Tuesday
March 28, 2017

Post a New Question

Posted by on .

An 850 gram chunk of ice at 0 degrees Celsius is dropped into a container holding 1.7 kg of water at an initial temperature of 35 degrees Celsius. Due to the presence of the ice, the temperature of the water eventually drops to 0 degrees Celsius. Show a mathematical solution to answer this question:
Does the 850 gram chunk of ice completely melt?
Formulas: Q= mHf Q=mHv Q= m∆TCp
The specific heat of liquid is 4.18J/gᵒC
The specific heat of solid water (ice) is 2.11J/gᵒC
The heat energy released during melting is 334J/g

  • Chemistry - ,

    heat to melt ice at zero C = 850 x heat fusion = ?
    heat removed from 35 C water = 1,700 x specific heat water x (0-35) = ?

    I get about 280,000 J to melt the ice and about 250,000 J from the water. The ice won't melt completely. The end solution will be a mixture of ice and water at zero C. You can calculate how much ice is left if you wish. There is enough data to do that.

  • Chemistry - ,

    Could you please prove how the ice doesn't completely melt? Don't you subtract 280,000 J and 250,000 J and get 30,000 J? and then you divide it by 334 J/g and get 105 g? But I don't know what you do next.

  • Chemistry - ,

    I caution you not to use my estimates. Those are just close numbers; you need to run them yourself.
    What I did above SHOWS that the ice doesn't completely melt. Yes, you subtract 280,000 - 250,000 and show that you are 30,000 J short of having enough heat to melt all of the ice. I don't think anything else is necessary. Again, that 30,000 is an estimate. You need to run that number too.

Answer This Question

First Name:
School Subject:
Answer:

Related Questions

More Related Questions

Post a New Question