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Phi103

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What is the truth value of the sentence "P v ~ P"? (Points : 1)
True
False
Cannot be determined
Not a sentence

2. One of the disadvantages of using truth tables is (Points : 1)
it is difficult to keep the lines straight
T's are easy to confuse with F's.
they grow exponentially and become too large for complex arguments.
they cannot distinguish strong inductive arguments from weak inductive arguments.

3. "P v Q" is best interpreted as (Points : 1)
P or Q but not both P and Q
P or Q or both P and Q
Not both P or Q
P if and only if Q

4. In the truth table for an invalid argument, (Points : 1)
on at least one row, where the premises are all true, the conclusion is true.
on at least one row, where the premises are all true, the conclusion is false.
on all the rows where the premises are all true, the conclusion is true.
on most of the rows, where the premises are all true, the conclusion is true.

5. What is the truth value of the sentence "P & ~ P"? (Points : 1)
True
False
Cannot be determined
Not a sentence

6. If P is false, and Q is false, the truth-value of "P ↔Q" is (Points : 1)
false.
true.
Cannot be determined.
All of the above.

7. A sentence is said to be truth-functional if and only if (Points : 1)
the sentence might be true.
the truth-value of the sentence cannot be determined from the truth values of its components.
the truth-value of the sentence is determined always to be false.
the truth-value of the sentence can be determined from the truth values of its components.

8. Truth tables can (Points : 1)
display all the possible truth values involved with a set of sentences.
determine what scientific claims are true.
determine if inductive arguments are strong.
determine if inductive arguments are weak.

9. The truth table for a valid deductive argument will show (Points : 1)
wherever the premises are true, the conclusion is true.
that the premises are false.
that some premises are true, some premises false.
wherever the premises are true, the conclusion is false.

10. In the conditional "P → Q," "Q is a (Points : 1)
sufficient condition for Q.
sufficient condition for P.
necessary condition for P.
necessary condition for Q.

  • Phi103 - ,

    1.a
    2.c
    3.b
    4.b
    5.b
    6.b
    7.?
    8.?
    9.?
    10.?

  • Phi103 - ,

    10. C

  • Phi103 - ,

    Grading Summary
    These are the automatically computed results of your exam. Grades for essay questions, and comments from your instructor, are in the "Details" section below.
    Date Taken: 8/26/2012
    Time Spent: 55 min , 41 secs
    Points Received: 8 / 10 (80%)
    Question Type: # Of Questions: # Correct:
    Multiple Choice 10 8
    Grade Details - All Questions
    1. Question :

    In the conditional "P →Q," "P" is a
    Student Answer: CORRECT sufficient condition for Q.
    sufficient condition for P.
    INCORRECT necessary condition for P.
    necessary condition for Q.
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 0 of 1
    Comments:

    2. Question :

    A conditional sentence with a false antecedent is always
    Student Answer: CORRECT true.
    false.
    INCORRECT Cannot be determined.
    not a sentence.
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 0 of 1
    Comments:

    3. Question :

    "P v Q" is best interpreted as
    Student Answer: P or Q but not both P and Q
    CORRECT P or Q or both P and Q
    Not both P or Q
    P if and only if Q
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    4. Question :

    "~ P v Q" is best read as
    Student Answer: Not P and Q
    It is not the case that P and it is not the case that Q
    CORRECT It is not the case that P or Q
    It is not the case that P and Q
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    5. Question :

    The sentence "P ↔ Q" is best read as


    Student Answer: If P then Q
    If Q then P
    P or Q
    CORRECT P if and only if Q
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    6. Question :

    The truth table for a valid deductive argument will show
    Student Answer: CORRECT wherever the premises are true, the conclusion is true.
    that the premises are false.
    that some premises are true, some premises false.
    wherever the premises are true, the conclusion is false.
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    7. Question :

    Truth tables can be used to examine
    Student Answer: inductive arguments.
    CORRECT deductive arguments.
    abductive arguments.
    All of the above
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    8. Question :

    The sentence "P → Q" is read as
    Student Answer: P or Q
    P and Q
    CORRECT If P then Q
    Q if and only P
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    9. Question :

    One of the disadvantages of using truth tables is
    Student Answer: it is difficult to keep the lines straight
    T's are easy to confuse with F's.
    CORRECT they grow exponentially and become too large for complex arguments.
    they cannot distinguish strong inductive arguments from weak inductive arguments.
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    10. Question :

    A sentence is said to be truth-functional if and only if
    Student Answer: the sentence might be true.
    the truth-value of the sentence cannot be determined from the truth values of its components.
    the truth-value of the sentence is determined always to be false.
    CORRECT the truth-value of the sentence can be determined from the truth values of its components.
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

  • Phi103 - ,

    "P v Q" is best interpreted as
    Student Answer: CORRECT P or Q but not both P and Q

  • Phi103 - ,

    3. Truth tables can (Points : 1)
    display all the possible truth values involved with a set of sentences.
    determine what scientific claims are true.
    determine if inductive arguments are strong.
    determine if inductive arguments are weak.

  • Phi103 - ,

    1. Question :

    "~ P v Q" is best read as
    Student Answer: Not P and Q
    INCORRECT It is not the case that P and it is not the case that Q
    CORRECT It is not the case that P or Q
    It is not the case that P and Q
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 0 of 1
    Comments:

    2. Question :

    "Julie and Kurt got married and had a baby" is best symbolized as
    Student Answer: M v B
    CORRECT M & B
    M → B
    M ↔ B


    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    3. Question :

    In the conditional "P → Q," "Q is a
    Student Answer: sufficient condition for Q.
    INCORRECT sufficient condition for P.
    CORRECT necessary condition for P.
    necessary condition for Q.
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 0 of 1
    Comments:

    4. Question :

    Truth tables can
    Student Answer: CORRECT display all the possible truth values involved with a set of sentences.
    determine what scientific claims are true.
    determine if inductive arguments are strong.
    determine if inductive arguments are weak.
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    5. Question :

    If P is true, and Q is false, the truth-value of "P v Q" is
    Student Answer: false.
    CORRECT true.
    Cannot be determined
    All of the above
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    6. Question :

    The truth table for a valid deductive argument will show
    Student Answer: CORRECT wherever the premises are true, the conclusion is true.
    that the premises are false.
    that some premises are true, some premises false.
    wherever the premises are true, the conclusion is false.
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    7. Question :

    The sentence "P ↔ Q" is best read as


    Student Answer: If P then Q
    If Q then P
    P or Q
    CORRECT P if and only if Q
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    8. Question :

    A sentence is said to be truth-functional if and only if
    Student Answer: the sentence might be true.
    the truth-value of the sentence cannot be determined from the truth values of its components.
    the truth-value of the sentence is determined always to be false.
    CORRECT the truth-value of the sentence can be determined from the truth values of its components.
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    9. Question :

    Truth tables can be used to examine
    Student Answer: inductive arguments.
    CORRECT deductive arguments.
    abductive arguments.
    All of the above
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

    10. Question :

    Truth tables can determine which of the following?
    Student Answer: CORRECT If an argument is valid
    If an argument is sound
    If a sentence is valid
    All of the above
    Instructor Explanation: The answer can be found in Chapter Six of An Introduction to Logic.
    Points Received: 1 of 1
    Comments:

  • Phi103 - ,

    "Julie and Kurt got married and had a baby" is best symbolized as M&B

    If P is false, and Q is false, the truth-value of "P<->Q" is true.

    The truth table for a valid deductive argument will show wherever the premises are true, the conclusion is true.

    "~P v Q" is best read as It is not the case that P or Q.

    In the truth table for an invalid argument, on at least on row, where the premises are all true, the conclusion is false.

    The sentence "P->Q" is read as If P then Q.

    One of the disadvantages of using truth tables is they grow exponentially and become too large for complex arguments.

    In the conditional"P->Q," "P" is a sufficient condition for Q.

    If P is true, and Q is false, the truth-value of"P v Q" is true.

    Truth tables can determine which of the following? If an argument is valid.

  • Phi103 - ,

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