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Posted by on Sunday, November 13, 2011 at 9:39pm.

Ionization is when an electron is removed from an atom and ionization energy is the energy required to do this. "Electrons stream from the negative electrode to the positive electrode. In the process of moving from one electrode to the other they knock electrons in the enclosed gas to higher energy levels. In many cases the electron is completely removed from the gas atom." I'm completely unsure of this but does the color of the neon sign depend on how high the ionization energy level needs to be to remove the electron from the gas atom?

  • Chemistry (Follow up post - Dr.BOB22) - , Sunday, November 13, 2011 at 9:46pm

    The color depends upon the energy emitted when the electron returns to the atom (the reverse of ionization). In a sense, then, what you say is true but it's an odd way of saying it. In addition, the quotes you have seem out of place in your short discussion. The words don't flow very well. There is a complete disjoint between your definition of ionization and the quotes.

  • Chemistry (Follow up post - Dr.BOB22) - , Sunday, November 13, 2011 at 10:11pm

    Oh, I'm sorry. I wasn't really trying to put them together. I just wanted you to see what I understood about ionization. And then ask my question. Do you think you could help me understand lasers and plasma arcs connection to ionization levels? or point me to a website that could help?

  • Chemistry (Follow up post - Dr.BOB22) - , Sunday, November 13, 2011 at 10:26pm

    (Broken Link Removed)

    htmhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser

  • Chemistry (Follow up post - Dr.BOB22) - , Sunday, November 13, 2011 at 11:33pm

    The first link seems to be broken.

  • Chemistry (Follow up post - Dr.BOB22) - , Monday, November 14, 2011 at 12:06am

    http://www.cpeo.org/techtree/ttdescript/plarctech.htm

  • Chemistry (Follow up post - Dr.BOB22) - , Monday, November 14, 2011 at 12:08am

    It seems to be working now.

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