Friday
April 18, 2014

Homework Help: calculus

Posted by Ben on Tuesday, November 8, 2011 at 7:34pm.

So from a previous post I asked,
"f(x)=(1+x) what is f'(x) when x=0?"

and someone replied,
"the derivative of f(x)=x+1 is f'(x)=1 so your answer would just be 1"

Now my question is why!? it doesn't matter what x is? f'x when x=238423904 will also be 1? For some reason I thought that you would have to plug in 0 for x.. like you've got f(x) = (1+x) and when x = 0, f(0) = (1+0) = 1. So f'(0) would = 0. Can anybody help me rationalize why this is wrong? thanks in advance

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