Thursday
December 18, 2014

Homework Help: Discrete Math

Posted by Francesca on Wednesday, March 23, 2011 at 2:55pm.

Use mathematical induction to prove the truth of each of the following assertions for all n ≥1.

5^2n 2^5n is divisible by 7

If n = 1, then 5^2(1) - 2^5(1) = -7, which is divisible by 7. For the inductive case, assume k ≥ 1, and the result is true for n = k; that is 7 | (5^2k + 2^5k). Use the assumption to prove n = k + 1, in other words, 5^(2(k + 1)) - 2^(5(k + 1)) is divisible by 7. Now,

5^(2(k + 1)) - 2^(5(k + 1))
= 5^(2k + 2) - 2(5k + 5)
= 5^(2k) 5^2 - 2^(5k) 2^5
= 25 5^(2k) - 32 2^(5k)
= IDK what to do from here. . .

Any suggestions? Thank you again!

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