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English - Native speakers

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Hello! I am trying to figure out one of the most difficult thing in English - articles. So I have one question:
Do we say I'm leaving home (Would people know that home means the place where we live?) Or is it correct I'm leaving the home? I personally think that the first example is correct because if we say the home it could maybe mean the nursing home or similar.Or is there an other explanation?
What about he always comes from work/the work at about 6. Is here the explanation that some phrases like do to work, come from work don't use the definite article?Or?

  • English - Native speakers - ,

    Do we say I'm leaving home (Would people know that home means the place where we live?) Or is it correct I'm leaving the home? I personally think that the first example is correct because if we say the home it could maybe mean the nursing home or similar.Or is there an other explanation?
    "Home" takes on a meaning that is more than just the house, the building. The saying, "Home is where the heart is," reflects that. You would say "I'm leaving home at noon today." You could also say, "I'm leaving the house at noon today." Both sentences mean the same thing. You wouldn't say, "I'm leaving the home," unless you mean a nursing home or someplace that is not your own home.

    What about he always comes from work/the work at about 6. Is here the explanation that some phrases like do to work, come from work don't use the definite article?Or?
    "He always comes home from work about 6 pm." That would be correct. Or you could say, "He leaves work about 5 pm every day." You would not use "the" or "a" in that context.

  • English - Native speakers - ,

    Thank you :) It's a lot easier now!
    Can you help me something else?
    What does this mean:
    Women usually ask what colour the car is-men ask what make it is. What does make mean?

  • English - Native speakers - ,

    and to have on show means what?

  • English - Native speakers - ,

    Another one! Why is this sentence nor correct? According to the weather, we'll either go out or stay in.

  • English - Native speakers - ,

    The make of a car is its name. I used to have a Toyota Camry, but now I have a Ford Fusion. The "make" is Toyota or Ford or one of those brand names; the model is the type of Toyota (Camry) or the type of Ford (Fusion) or whatever.

    To have "on show" must mean that it's on the showroom floor, it's on display at the auto dealer's business place.

    Hmmm -- "According to the weather, we'll either go out or stay in" -- seems to mean that if the weather is bad (cold, snowy, rainy, windy, etc.), we'll stay inside, and if the weather is good (sunny, warm, clear, etc.), we'll go outside or travel or something that indicates NOT staying indoors for the day.

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