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physics

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A tightly stretched "high wire" is 44 m long. It sags 3.8 m when a 56 kg tightrope walker stands at its center. What is the tension in the wire?
1 NIs it possible to increase the tension in the wire so that there is no sag?


so far i know you do the inverse sin of (3.8/22) to find theta
then (56x9.8)/2 to get 274

however, now im stuck at sin(9.95)/sin(9.95)= (274)/(3.8x9.8)

i can't figure out if i did the wrong equation or just why i am stuck.

  • physics - ,

    arcsin 3.8/22 = 9.95 degrees is the sag angle.
    So far, so good.

    2 T sin 9.95 = M g = 549 N
    That is the vertical force balance equation. T is the tension on either side of the tightrope walker.

    T = 549/[2*0.173) = 1590 N

    <<Is it possible to increase the tension in the wire so that there is no sag? >>
    No

  • physics - ,

    I believe you would use arctan. The rope is 44m long and 1/2 that becomes the adjacent leg. The distance sagged is the opposite leg so the angle should be arctan(3.8/22) or 9.79degrees. Plugging that in results in 1613N or approximately 1600N

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