Friday
August 1, 2014

Homework Help: Physics

Posted by Ian on Sunday, September 5, 2010 at 5:32pm.

Suppose that you are at the top of a (rigid) rocket which is half a light
year tall. If the rocket is accelerating such that your proper acceleration
is 1g,

What is the proper acceleration at the bottom of the rocket?

B =
F c2
c2 􀀀  F
:

This is one of the equations given:

alpha B = (alpha f c^2)/(c^2 - delta alpha f)

It seems that delta alpha f is the difference in accelerations. I can't find any equation that uses the distance. Is it OK to use the distance in this one?

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