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March 26, 2017

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Can you please take a look at my questions. Thank you very much.


1.classify the law of definite proportions.

In specific proportions, A type of compound always contains the same elements.

Is this good? Any other info would be greatly appreciated.

2.how do u distinguish the difference between the ion charge of a metal & the ion charge of a non-metla?

I wrote: u distinguish the difference between the ion charge of a metal & the ion charge of a non-metal by their charges. Ion charges of metals are positive, & ion charges of non-metals r always negative.

3.What occurs to the charge on individual ions when they create compounds?

I wrote: when the individual ions create compounds, the charge on them cancels out. It becomes neutral.

4.Give a definition for a Polyatomic ion.

I wrote: A Polyatomic ion is a kind of atom grouped with other atoms which occur together in a compound & r treated as a single element; have a charge like an ion due to an imbalance of electrons and protons.

Then it says give three examples of Polyatomic ions.

Three examples of Polyatomic ions are OH-(hydroxide ion); which is negative, NH4(ammonium), which has ion charge of 1+ and is postive, as well as CO32-(carbonate ion), which is negative.

Could you please tell me more about Polyatomic ions. I don't really understand much about them. I want to get the general idea of them.

5.whats the ion charge of each of the following individual or polyatomic ions?

a)Calcium = +2
b)aluminum = +3
c)copper(II)= ?
d)ammonium = +1
e)iron(II) = +2 = I don't get where the II comes from? Could you please explain to me why the names of some metal ions such as this one, have a Roman numeral after them?

f)sulfur = -2
g)oxygen = -2
h)fluorine = -1
i)nitrate = -1
j)carbonate = -2


Can you also explain to me how the endings of some elements are changed. Ex. chlorine to chloride, then sulphite. Where does the ite come from. I don't really get this stuff, which is why I am asking for deep clarification.

I still have a few more questions which I will post on here after I'm done completing my other work. Till then please take ur time to view through this, and add as much information as you can. Thank you very, very much 4 all your help:-)

  • Ion Charge & Formulas of Ionic Compounds - ,

    1.classify the law of definite proportions.

    In specific proportions, A type of compound always contains the same elements.
    I suggest, A particular compound always contains the same elements in the same proportions.

    Is this good? Any other info would be greatly appreciated.

    2.how do u distinguish the difference between the ion charge of a metal & the ion charge of a non-metla?

    I wrote: u distinguish the difference between the ion charge of a metal & the ion charge of a non-metal by their charges. Ion charges of metals are positive, & ion charges of non-metals r always negative.

    3.What occurs to the charge on individual ions when they create compounds?

    I wrote: when the individual ions create compounds, the charge on them cancels out. It becomes neutral.
    cancels out and they become neutral.

    4.Give a definition for a Polyatomic ion.

    I wrote: A Polyatomic ion is a kind of atom grouped with other atoms which occur together in a compound & r treated as a single element; have a charge like an ion due to an imbalance of electrons and protons.

    Then it says give three examples of Polyatomic ions.

    Three examples of Polyatomic ions are OH-(hydroxide ion); which is negative, NH4(ammonium), which has ion charge of 1+ and is postive, as well as CO32-(carbonate ion), which is negative.

    Could you please tell me more about Polyatomic ions. I don't really understand much about them. I want to get the general idea of them.
    I don't know what else to add. You have described them very well and your examples are correct.

    5.whats the ion charge of each of the following individual or polyatomic ions?

    a)Calcium = +2
    b)aluminum = +3
    c)copper(II)= ? The (II) tells you +2
    d)ammonium = +1
    e)iron(II) = +2 = I don't get where the II comes from? Could you please explain to me why the names of some metal ions such as this one, have a Roman numeral after them?
    The Roman numeral tells you the valence or oxidation state (or whatever term you are using) of the metal ion. No Roman numeral is used for group 1 or group 2 because those elements don't have multiple charges. However, since iron, for example, has compounds in the +2 state and the +3 state, we must have a way to distinguish between them. A man named STOCK came up with the idea of placing a Roman numeral in parentheses beside the symbol to designate the valence; hence, Fe^+2 is Fe(II) and Fe^+3 is Fe(III), Cr+2 is Cr(II) while Cr+6 is Cr(VI) etc. The literature now calls this the IUPAC system BUT Stock is the one who started it.

    f)sulfur = -2
    g)oxygen = -2
    h)fluorine = -1
    i)nitrate = -1
    j)carbonate = -2


    Can you also explain to me how the endings of some elements are changed. Ex. chlorine to chloride, then sulphite. Where does the ite come from. I don't really get this stuff, which is why I am asking for deep clarification.
    Binary compounds (those with two elements only) are named with the metal first. The name of the anion comes next with a "stem" of the element + the ending -ide. Thus NaCl is sodium chloride, Na2S is sodium sulfide, NaBr is sodium bromide, and we have fluorides, oxides, iodides, etc. The word "chlorine" means the element. The word "chloride" tells Cl^- is the anion in a binary compound. The other part of the question on changing the suffix--
    For ternary compounds (three elements to the compound) we name the metal first followed by the anion. The anion is named for the acid from which it was derived. For example, Na2SO4 is sodium sulfATE (It comes from H2SO4 which is sulfurIC acid). Na2SO3 is sodium sulfITE. It comes from H2SO3 (sulfurOUS acid). This may sound confusing to you getting it all at once but here is the way it is done. The IC ending is changed to ATE. The OUS ending is changed to ITE. Later on you may see prefixes used, also, so names like sodium PERsulfATE and sodium HYPOsulfITE become like tongue twisters but that's how the naming goes.


    I still have a few more questions which I will post on here after I'm done completing my other work. Till then please take ur time to view through this, and add as much information as you can. Thank you very, very much 4 all your help:-)

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  • Ion Charge & Formulas of Ionic Compounds - ,

    Thank you very much DrBob222:-)

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