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August 22, 2014

Homework Help: Chemistry

Posted by Anonymous on Monday, April 19, 2010 at 6:27pm.

In lab we conducted a calorimetry experiment with a peanut. We burned a half a peanut and placed it underneath a pop can with 50mL of water inside. One of our questions is why heat transfer to the pop can isn't accounted for when calculating heat generated and why it's reasonable. Can anyone explain how this is because I would think that it's unreasonable.

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