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write a 500-750 word paper in apa format describing the structure, business model, and culture of a beauty salon, provide justificationfor why you selected each element and explain how your choice may effect your business?

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    Please understand that no one here will do your work for you. However, we will be happy to read over whatever you come up with and make suggestions and/or corrections.

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    Dramatized Styles
    Job Fair Brochure
    Taria Hess
    Axia College
    Business 210
    02/28/2010
    COURTNEY ANDERSON











    Dramatized Styles Job Fair Brochure
    Dramatized Styles is a full-service beauty salon dedicated to consistently providing high customer satisfaction by rendering excellent service, quality products, and furnishing an enjoyable atmosphere. We will maintain a friendly, fair, and creative work environment at all times, which respects diversity, ideas, and hard work.
    Our Mission: To supply services and products that enhances our clients' physical appearance and mental relaxation.
    Our Motto: " We are a cut above the rest discover the new you at Dramatized Styles where style is created and everyday is A good hair day!"
    The timing is right for starting this new venture. Patiently searching for six months for the perfect location, one was finally found. The demand from the owner's clients, as well as the ambitions of the owner to one day start her own salon, and the procurement of highly professional and qualified beauticians to support the salon, has made this business one of great potential.
    Taria has created a large client following through hard work and dedication. Taria, and her talented team of beauticians and Nail Tech’s have what it takes to make this venture an extremely successful one. We expect our growing reputation to lead to new clients and Employees to support our anticipated growth.
    To achieve our objectives, Dramatized Styles is seeking additional keys to success in offering :
    • Location: providing an easily accessible location for customers and employees.
    • Environment: providing an environment conducive to giving relaxing and professional service.
    • Convenience: offering clients a wide range of services in one setting, and extended business hours.
    • Reputation: reputation of the owner and other beauticians and Nail Tech’s as providing superior service.
    • Every new business owner needs to know the fundamentals. We are breaking down those building blocks by offering Franchise Opportunities in an excelling industry. Taken together, the information we provide in our training will give developing entrepreneurs a head start on making those first critical steps.
    • How much will I need to shell out in start-up costs and ongoing expenses?
    • Smaller beauty salons with fewer stylists can make good money with only a handful of chairs. Still, there are economies of scale in this business, so a good idea would be to have at least five or six chairs (and the same number of stylists, and or Nail Tech’s).
    • To fit that many chairs, Fitting out a space from scratch will run give or take a couple hundred dollars, depending how stylish the design. Super high-end salons in ritzy ZIP codes might double up on their spending in start-up costs to make the salon, neighborhood friendly.
    • You will probably make several months of rent out of pocket while getting set up and getting the Clientele up. Expect to drag through the first six to nine months before operating at full capacity with stylists, tech’s, hair washers and secretarial staff. And don't forget the supplies and operational software needed for keeping the finances in order.
    • Once up and running, your biggest expense is people. You can compensate stylists and tech’s one of two ways. In the commission-based model, each stylist receives a percentage of what they bring in. Commissions typically range from 35% and up. Some salons use a graduated commission scale to encourage stylists to attract more customers. For example, a stylist might keep 40% of the first Thousand Dollars they bring in per week, and an agreed upon additional amount for each additional Thousand Dollars. If you end up paying more than 50% in commissions, you are taking a risk in the revenue being slim to none.
    • The second option is the booth rental model. This is where the salon owner acts as a landlord and charges stylists and tech’s an agreed upon rate for the use of their chair. Often times this is paid at the owner’s discretion of how frequent they expect to collect rent whether it is weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly. In most cases this is done on a weekly basis. Most stylists like this model better because they do not have to wait every two weeks to get paid.
    • You will need support staff, to assist the stylist in: hair Shampooers, appointment takers, stylists in training and someone to watch the books. Expect these staffing costs to cut around 10% of sales.
    • As for other ongoing expenses if the commission’s model is used, they include your stylists' share of payroll taxes, most salons do not offer health insurance and other fringe benefits are uncommon; rent and property taxes for franchise owner. Supplies, marketing and advertising, maintenance and insurance.
    • Finally, if you want to stay on the cutting edge, you'll need some sort of in-house training program and compensation for education--including outside classes and the lost time in-house stylists burn teaching younger staff.

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